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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Graphical visualization of text similarities in essays in a book | munterbund.de

Graphical visualization of text similarities in essays in a book | munterbund.de | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

Introduced me to the term "metadata". Lately, I've been reading about transparency and accessibility. It's not enough to simply have the information. We need to be able to understand it and understand enough to make decisions about it. Then we have to apply that information. Similar concepts: informed consent, citizen engagement.  But just like in lab reports for studies/research, essays about data contains biases to recognize and conclusions to interpret and evaluate for validity. Metadata examines these issues.

 

"Metadata

Examples of essay metadata are the essay’s author, the time period in which an essay was written, the essay language, the number or type of images it uses, the text genre, the intended audience, the essay length (in characters, words, sentences, sections, pages), file format, typeface, etc. We find that it is possible to automate the collection of some of these metadata. For example, the language in which an article is written can be determined by comparing the words used in the article with words of other known languages. If the article contains words associated with the region where Romanian is spoken, it was most likely written in Romanian [ad.01]. If words are unknown to the computer, it will not be able to determine the language.

 Early stages in the process to the final result

For the most part, the time period during which an essay was written can be retrieved automatically - provided that the text was written on a computer and the word-processing program kept track of the writing sessions. If images are available in digital form, it is also possible to automate the processing of image metadata, since in in such cases, image file formats, dimensions, color depths and resolutions are known. However, image content is meta-information that needs to be classified manually. Consequently, classification of metadata as manual or automatic must be performed on a case-by-case basis. Although the length of a text is meta-information, it can be determined automatically in such great detail that it transitions to the domain of automatically collectable metadata.

 
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8 Subconscious Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day--And How To Avoid Them

8 Subconscious Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day--And How To Avoid Them | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The swimmers body illusion and other ways our brains play tricks on us.
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In praise of meddling kids | Rationalist Association

In praise of meddling kids | Rationalist Association | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The intrepid debunking teens – and a dog – make Scooby Doo ideal rationalist TV, says Myra Zepf
Sharrock's insight:

An administrator might use this show (Scooby Doo) to discuss data analysis as a kind of debunking of superstitious, party lines to explore rational explanations. Where is learning taking place? What is not working? How can we improve practices? Let's be those meddling kids!

 

This was an easy but valuable read. I found it entertaining and informative. Can this find its way into a secondary school classroom? I think so. I think it would work as non-fictional reading in any subject. It introduces useful terms as well: double-entendre, rationalism, superstition, per se, and intrepid. It could also help to distinguish betweeen plot and story in that the old Scooby Doo tv series had the same plot repeatedly but the story details changed slightly. A classroom could discuss how many other tv show series were "formulaic." Is this a bad thing or a good thing? This could also lead to questioning if something can be "bad" or "good". After all, a show designed for entertainment achieves its goals when there is an audience. This could lead to questioning and ways to construct an appropriate question? elements of an appropriate question. Open versus closed questions? etc.

 

From the article: "It’s not that Scooby-Doo has another "adult" level that I can suddenly decipher. There are no double-entendres for me to snigger at or references above my children’s heads. What they see and understand is what I see and understand. Only now, as an adult, I have a wider context within which to place it."

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Less serious legal research – Slaw

Less serious legal research – Slaw | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Why is it that legal texts turn off many eager readers? Sometimes this is due to their inherent complexity. No one can reasonably expect to obtain a simple overview of the Canadian tax system. It is complex and so are the rules that enforce it. Sometimes, legal information is made unnecessarily complex. One could think that plain language is heresy amongst authors of primary legal information. Even though court cases stand closest to common everyday communication, a trend becomes apparent that court opinions are getting longer and more complex. Public access analysts say that it has become a challenge for judges and justices, public information officers, and members of the bar to make sure that the public understands what is expressed in a court opinion. Evidently, contracts are among the less legible documents. 

Sharrock's insight:

Although this page basically reviews Canadian law, it offers an important rationale for learning critical thinking skills and explains the problems of overly complex legal language. "Public access analysts say that it has become a challenge for judges and justices, public information officers, and members of the bar to make sure that the public understands what is expressed in a court opinion." So, there is problem in understanding the law and its interpretation as well as the reasoning involved in judgments, among other decions made in the courtroom. 

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» 15 Common Cognitive Distortions - Psych Central

» 15 Common Cognitive Distortions - Psych Central | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
What's a cognitive distortion and why do so many people have them? Cognitive distortions are simply ways that our mind convinces us of something that isn't
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