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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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Understanding Character Wounds: A List Of Common Themes

Understanding Character Wounds: A List Of Common Themes | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Characters are the heart of a novel, and within that heart is the Hero’s Inner Journey. The protagonist’s path is much like yours or mine–one that will (hopefully) bring him closer to lifelong happiness and fulfillment. In real life, people … Continue reading →

Via Ruth Long
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Planning Character Arcs

If you like to plan your stories ahead, you’ve almost certainly sketched out your plot. But have you planned your character arcs? Every story needs a character arc for its protagonist, even if it’s simple or subtly conveyed. And while supporting characters don’t always need an arc, stories are better off when they’re included.

 

Luckily, characters arcs work very much like any other plot strand you might be working on. The difference is that they focus on inner events rather than external ones, which can make them harder to wrap your head around. If you have a character that needs an arc and you’re not sure how to add one, these steps will get you started.


Via Ruth Long
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KindredReaders's curator insight, March 10, 8:29 AM

Most of us think of supporting characters in terms of the role they need to play. This article suggests you step back and think of the constellation of characters as a whole, then as individuals. A worthwhile read!

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Plotting by Yes or No

Ruth Long 's insight:

Basic scene structure says a scene can end in one of four ways. A yes, a no, a yes but there's a catch, or a no and it makes things worse. These are questions designed to move the story forward and advance the plot. Some work better than others, because they leave more room for things to happen and give you as the writer a place to go. If you always write scenes with yes or no answers, you might find yourself getting stuck, or making it too easy on your protagonist. 

You can use this yes or no approach at the end of every scene, or you can layer it throughout the scene to keep the reader asking questions and being drawn more into what's happening. I'm going to use a movie as the example, but the same principles apply to novels. Movies are just easier to study since they're visual and more people have likely seen them.


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Ruth Long 's curator insight, March 30, 5:27 PM

Basic scene structure says a scene can end in one of four ways. A yes, a no, a yes but there's a catch, or a no and it makes things worse. These are questions designed to move the story forward and advance the plot. Some work better than others, because they leave more room for things to happen and give you as the writer a place to go. If you always write scenes with yes or no answers, you might find yourself getting stuck, or making it too easy on your protagonist.

You can use this yes or no approach at the end of every scene, or you can layer it throughout the scene to keep the reader asking questions and being drawn more into what's happening. I'm going to use a movie as the example, but the same principles apply to novels. Movies are just easier to study since they're visual and more people have likely seen them.