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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Thermal expansion

Thermal expansion | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
thermal expansion ( thrml ikspanchn ) ( physics ) The dimensional changes exhibited by solids, liquids, and gases for ch
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I like this. "Molecular Translational Energy

In scientific terms, heat is internal energy that flows from a system of relatively high temperature to one at a relatively low temperature. The internal energy itself, identified as thermal energy, is what people commonly mean when they say "heat." A form of kinetic energy due to the movement of molecules, thermal energy is sometimes called molecular translational energy.

Temperature is defined as a measure of the average molecular translational energy in a system, and the greater the temperature change for most materials, as we shall see, the greater the amount of thermal expansion. Thus, all these aspects of "heat"—heat itself (in the scientific sense), as well as thermal energy, temperature, and thermal expansion—are ultimately affected by the motion of molecules in relation to one another."

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Mpemba effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mpemba effect

The Mpemba effect, named after Erasto Mpemba, is the assertion that, in some circumstances, warmer water can freeze faster than colder water. Although there is anecdotal support for the effect, there is no agreement on exactly what the effect is and under what circumstances it occurs.

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The Coase Theorem is widely cited in economics. Ronald Coase hated it.

The Coase Theorem is widely cited in economics. Ronald Coase hated it. | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Coase argued transaction costs were essential for understanding economics. Many people claim he said the opposite.
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Physical constant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A physical constant is a physical quantity that is generally believed to be both universal in nature and constant in time. It can be contrasted with a mathematical constant, which is a fixed numerical value, but does not directly involve any physical measurement.

There are many physical constants in science, some of the most widely recognized being the speed of light in vacuum c, the gravitational constant G, Planck's constant h, the electric constant ε0, and the elementary charge e. Physical constants can take many dimensional forms: the speed of light signifies a maximum speed limit of the Universe and is expressed dimensionally as length divided by time; while the fine-structure constant α, which characterizes the strength of the electromagnetic interaction, is dimensionless.

Whereas the physical quantity indicated by any physical constant does not depend on the unit system used to express the quantity, the numerical values of dimensional physical constants do depend on the unit used. Therefore, these numerical values (such as 299,792,458 for the constant speed of light c expressed in units of meters per second) are not values that a theory of physics can be expected to predict.

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In science, it is important to explore the dependence on measurements and constants. 

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Light from Ancient Quasar Reveals Intergalactic Web

Astronomers say it's the first direct imaging of the long-sought gas filaments stretching between galaxies
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Algodoo

Algodoo | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

This is a downloadable physics playground where you can experiment with all sorts of structures, forces and virtual materials. It's great fun. There is also a iPad app to explore. Found via http://twitter.com/@dannynic
http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science


Via ICTmagic
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Andrew Hadjichari's curator insight, November 3, 2013 3:43 PM

Great software that now comes for the iPad. A must app for teaching and learning of physics.

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What Is It Like to Be a Mathematician?

What Is It Like to Be a Mathematician? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Mathematician Edward Frenkel of the University of California–Berkeley wants to expose the beauty of mathematics, inspire awe at its power, and challenge his colleagues to wield it for good. His new book is Love and Math: The Heart of Hidden Reality.
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"I believe that physical reality as we know it and the world of mathematical ideas are two separate worlds, and neither can subjugate the other. For example, we talk about the standard model of physics, which has been very successful in predicting a whole range of phenomena. Of course, the discovery of the Higgs boson last summer was abig trial for the standard model. But from a mathematical perspective, it is just one of a tremendous class of models. We don't observe the others in our reality, but do they exist? Well, one can argue that they do in the ideal world of mathematics." --Edward Frenkel

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Eric Weinstein may have found the answer to physics' biggest problems | Marcus du Sautoy

Eric Weinstein may have found the answer to physics' biggest problems | Marcus du Sautoy | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
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