Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
2.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

9 Cheap Ways To Network In A New City | CAREEREALISM

9 Cheap Ways To Network In A New City | CAREEREALISM | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Moved to a new city but not sure how you can swing expensive networking events? Here are some cheap and easy ways to get your networking on.
Sharrock's insight:

This is a resource to explore ways characters may meet for the first time (or second time in a different light). This is also helpful for introverts who struggle with meeting new people but want to. Business types can benefit from meeting people for fun rather than for direct, work-related benefits.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

business - The Importance of Diversity in Networking

business - The Importance of Diversity in Networking | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
business - The Importance of Diversity in Networking - Entrepreneur.com
Sharrock's insight:

 Do you really pursue diversity in your friendships and work relationships? What have you discovered when you really listed your friends and work relationships? Differences include class, race, religion, sexual orientation, gender, age, political beliefs, nationality, intellectual, education (and even more). Do people really have "nothing" in common? When is "having nothing in common" a good thing? Stories of happy surprises are welcome.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Teens aren’t abandoning “social.” They’re just using the word correctly. — Understandings & Epiphanies — Medium

Advertisers are perplexed and a little angst-y.

I know this, because I work in advertising.

Via Darin Stevenson
more...
Darin Stevenson's curator insight, January 2, 2014 11:05 AM

What this means is that teens are demonstrating a mode of intelligence that the adults »cannot muster.

And more: they know the difference between cohesion and being separated into little packs of diseases. How do they know?

Because that is what we do to them all day, every day.

Social media: We are doing it WRONG.

“Social” is what happens when someone posts personal information—photos, thoughts, announcements, favorite songs, jokes—on the internet and another person comes along and clicks a thumbs up icon or a star or a heart. If someone’s really “social,” they’ll even type a comment or reply.

Kids aren’t leaving social networks. They’re redefining the word “social.” Rather, they’re actually using the word with the intent of its original meaning: making contact with other human beings. Communicating. Back-and-forth, fairly immediate dialogue. Most of it digitally. But most of it with the intent of a conversation where two (or more) people are exchanging information and emotion. Not posting it. Exchanging it.”

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

#1 Mistake People Make When Trying To Meet New Friends | CAREEREALISM

#1 Mistake People Make When Trying To Meet New Friends | CAREEREALISM | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
People make a common mistake when they're trying to meet new friends and make valuable connections. Are you making this networking mistake? Find out!
Sharrock's insight:

This is a resource to explore ways characters may meet for the first time (or second time in a different light). This is also helpful for introverts who struggle with meeting new people but want to. Business types can benefit from meeting people for fun rather than for direct, work-related benefits.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Network Theory
Scoop.it!

'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics

'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In their computer simulations of human evolution, scientists have discovered the emergence of the “homo socialis” with “other-regarding” preferences.

Via Viktor Markowski, Ashish Umre, Michael Holder
more...
Viktor Markowski's curator insight, March 25, 2013 3:49 PM

Economics has a beautiful body of theory. But does it describe real markets? Doubts have come up not only in the wake of the financial crisis, since financial crashes should not occur according to the then established theories. Since ages, economic theory is based on concepts such as efficient markets and the “homo economicus”, i.e. the assumption of competitively optimizing individuals and firms. It was believed that any behavior deviating from this would create disadvantages and, hence, be eliminated by natural selection. But experimental evidence from behavioral economics show that, on average, people behave more fairness-oriented and other-regarding than expected. A new theory by scientists from ETH Zurich now explains why. 

luiy's curator insight, March 25, 2013 5:33 PM

Evolution of “friendliness”


Prof. Dirk Helbing of ETH Zurich, who coordinated the study, adds: “Compared to conventional models for the evolution of social cooperation, we have distinguished between the actual behavior – cooperation or not – and an inherited character trait, describing the degree of other-regarding preferences, which we call the friendliness.” The actual behavior considers not only the own advantage (“payoff”), but also gives a weight to the payoff of the interaction partners depending on the individual friendliness. For the “homo economicus”, the weight is zero. The friendliness spreads from one generation to the next according to natural selection. This is merely based on the own payoff, but mutations happen.

For most parameter combinations, the model predicts the evolution of a payoff-maximizing “homo economicus” with selfish preferences, as assumed by a great share of the economic literature. Very surprisingly, however, biological selection may create a “homo socialis” with other-regarding preferences, namely if offsprings tend to stay close to their parents. In such a case, clusters of friendly people, who are “conditionally cooperative”, may evolve over time.

If an unconditionally cooperative individual is born by chance, it may be exploited by everyone and not leave any offspring. However, if born in a favorable, conditionally cooperative environment, it may trigger cascade-like transitions to cooperative behavior, such that other-regarding behavior pays off. Consequently, a “homo socialis” spreads.

 

 

Networked minds create a cooperative human species


“This has fundamental implications for the way, economic theories should look like,” underlines Professor Helbing. Most of today’s economic knowledge is for the “homo economicus”, but people wonder whether that theory really applies. A comparable body of work for the “homo socialis” still needs to be written.

While the “homo economicus” optimizes its utility independently, the “homo socialis” puts himself or herself into the shoes of others to consider their interests as well,” explains Grund, and Helbing adds: “This establishes something like “networked minds”. Everyone’s decisions depend on the preferences of others.” This becomes even more important in our networked world.

 

 

A participatory kind of economy


How will this change our economy? Today, many customers doubt that they get the best service by people who are driven by their own profits and bonuses. “Our theory predicts that the level of other-regarding preferences is distributed broadly, from selfish to altruistic. Academic education in economics has largely promoted the selfish type. Perhaps, our economic thinking needs to fundamentally change, and our economy should be run by different kinds of people,” suggests Grund. “The true capitalist has other-regarding preferences,” adds Helbing, “as the “homo socialis” earns much more payoff.” This is, because the “homo socialis” manages to overcome the downwards spiral that tends to drive the “homo economicus” towards tragedies of the commons. The breakdown of trust and cooperation in the financial markets back in 2008 might be seen as good example.

“Social media will promote a new kind of participatory economy, in which competition goes hand in hand with cooperation,” believes Helbing. Indeed, the digital economy’s paradigm of the “prosumer” states that the Internet, social platforms, 3D printers and other developments will enable the co-producing consumer. “It will be hard to tell who is consumer and who is producer”, says Christian Waloszek. “You might be both at the same time, and this creates a much more cooperative perspective.”

Onearth's curator insight, March 26, 2013 4:58 AM

After homo sapiens sapiens it's time for homo sapiens socialis

Rescooped by Sharrock from Collaboration in the 21st Century classroom
Scoop.it!

The Power of Networks

The Power of Networks | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In this RSA Animate video, we learn about the shift in thinking about the connections of life. What is presented is the idea that our increased understanding of the complexity and inter-connectivit...

Via Grant Montgomery
more...
No comment yet.