Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
Curated by Sharrock
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10 Things You Don't Know About - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

10 Things You Don't Know About

No. in series No. in season Title Original air date Secrets of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt are explored. FDR's mother wants him to dump Eleanor FDR loves his wife's secretary Eleanor's unconventional girlfriends turn her into a political activist FDR avoids assassination thanks to a rickety bench Eleanor wants FDR to become a dictator Eleanor falls in love...

Sharrock's insight:

I've just started watching this show. It's amazing!

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This Is Your Brain On Literature

This Is Your Brain On Literature | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"Research shows that reading rich narratives and metaphors activates areas of our brain outside of language, and frequent fiction reading is correlated with empathy. Brain scans are revealing what happens in our heads when we read a detailed description, an evocative metaphor or an emotional exchange between characters. Stories, this research is showing, stimulate the brain and even change how we act in life. The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated." | by Amir Aczel


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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, April 28, 2014 11:38 AM

From time.com - Today, 9:56 AM
This Is Your Brain on Great Literature
TIME

These findings will affirm the experience of readers who have felt illuminated and instructed by a novel, who have found themselves comparing a plucky young woman to Elizabeth Bennet or a tiresome pedant to Edward Casaubon. Reading great literature, it has long been averred, enlarges and improves us as human beings. Brain science shows this claim is truer than we imagined.

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David Blixt: The Rules Of Violence - Part One

David Blixt: The Rules Of Violence - Part One | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There's been a great deal of talk about violence in media (meaning film and video-games), painting all fictional violence with a damning brush. It’s an important conversation, and one I’d like to have.

Via Ruth Long
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Quick Writing Exercise Seems to Work Magic for Couples' Contentment - PsychCentral.com

Quick Writing Exercise Seems to Work Magic for Couples' Contentment - PsychCentral.com | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
PsychCentral.com Quick Writing Exercise Seems to Work Magic for Couples' Contentment PsychCentral.com Quick Writing Exercise Seems to Work Magic for Couples' Contentment New research suggests a brief writing intervention can help spouses adopt a...

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Cognitive Biases in Times of Uncertainty--Telling Ourselves A New Story

Cognitive Biases in Times of Uncertainty--Telling Ourselves A New Story | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
We live in a world of increasing pressure and uncertainty, driven in large part by digital technology infrastructures.

 

Author John Hagel goes on to explain a vicious business mindset we face today that constricts our opportunities and keeps us either stuck, or trending downward.

 

There are several pieces contributing to this limiting cycle and the narrative we tell ourselves, and each other, is a HUGE part of the problem. 

 

Hagel documents the threat-based narrative we are surrounded by and its consequences for our businesses (and political life):

ProtectionismPolarizationShort term focusMagnified risk while sacrificing potential rewardsUrgent reactionismUniformity versus innovationMinimal trust

 

This is not what we want for 2012. As writer Salman Rushdie says, "Those who do not have power over the story that dominates their lives truly are powerless, because they cannot think new thoughts."

 

In other words, if you want different results, change the story you are telling yourself.

 

Hagel brilliantly lays out the mindset problem and narrative we face today, and offers us an alternative.  The alternative starts with sharing a new narrative, and then supporting structures to make it real.

 

Read this article.  Shift the story. Add reinforcing structures to your business. You can do this in your own life and business -- you don't have to wait for some powers-t0-be to take action first. 

 

In this case, it is all about you!


Via Karen Dietz
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Meri Walker's comment, January 8, 2012 2:38 PM
Just back from 5 days with Byron Katie in Los Angeles and this is precisely what she teaches with The Work. What a great piece! Thanks for sharing it, Karen.
Karen Dietz's comment, January 8, 2012 5:02 PM
Glad you like it Meri! Byron Katie's work is fabulous. I've been talking a lot about this article a lot lately because I think it is so important for people to get. Have a great weekend!
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Unearthing Organisational Stories: finding the narrative

Unearthing Organisational Stories: finding the narrative | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

 

"It's a little wordy, is that normal in your field?" was Heidi's response to my first draft. Her tact doing little to numb the honesty. In some areas, volume is good: boxes or chocolate and length ...

Via juandoming, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 13, 2014 11:15 AM

Stories are the cultural myths that help us make sense of the culture. In sharing them, we bring ourselves closer together. Myths always have elements of truth and underlying wisdom speaking though them. We have to be careful the stories are not co-opted by those who just want to tell stories, in other words bullshit us.

 

School is quite susceptible to the co-opting process when we hunker down in our classrooms and live in isolation. One school blogger takes stories and shares them as they are his when he spent little time in the classroom developing his own stories. This kind of co-opting is harmful and strips the myth of its truthfulness and wisdom.

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The Original Cupid Was a Sociopath | Bering in Mind, Scientific American Blog Network

The Original Cupid Was a Sociopath | Bering in Mind, Scientific American Blog Network | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

It was the Roman writer Lucius Apuleius who brought Cupid to life in his ancient book of fables, The Golden Ass. Apuleius’s Cupid was no mischievous toddler with hummingbird wings but an impulsive god who rejoiced in causing sexual havoc for all earthly creatures. Even the fearless Apollo refers to Cupid as “serpent dire and fierce”:

 

Sharrock's insight:

“The destiny of the world is determined less by the battles that are lost and won than by the stories it loves and believes in.” —Harold Goddard

 

Cupid isn't who he was. Children's folklore and fables are almost lost to popular culture. 

 

Cultural euphemisms and white washes hit Grimm's tales and now, apparently, Roman fables: "Apuleius’s Cupid wasn't so much a romantic matchmaker as a devil subjecting hapless people to a toxic lust, one that blinded them with hypersexual urges. This allegory of a capricious god who pierces mortal hearts only to burden them with some scandalous attraction out of sheer boredom or as favors to other gods is reminiscent of nature’s cold mindlessness when it comes to human sexuality. Individuals with the most deviant desires have similarly found themselves at the whim of a terrible randomness. To learn more about the science of “erotic outliers,”

 What other tales were censored or re-written and popularized? 

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How to build a micronation | TED Blog

How to build a micronation | TED Blog | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
TED Fellow Jorge Mañes Rubio has created a new micronation in response to the social struggles of a small neighborhood in Amsterdam.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 26, 2014 11:04 AM

Very cool article!  Building a "micronation" when you have a group that comes from a variety of different backgrounds involves creating a common goal!  This TED blog shows how one artist managed to do just that.   Projects like this open new possibilities that might expand the future impact of artists on social issues — going beyond the pre-established white cube context.

 

 "These organizations are  heavily structured, with little interaction between each other, and showed little wiggle room for change. Meanwhile, I noticed that the cultural diversity caused a lot of tension and confusion, particularly among young children. We decided that whatever solution we came up with should not only involve the neighbors, but should also somehow bring together the existing organizations in the area for a common purpose. It all sounded great. But how?"

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True or False? Pay Attention to Structure to Tell if a Story is Made Up

True or False? Pay Attention to Structure to Tell if a Story is Made Up | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Psychologists and psychotherapists have long relied on the power of narrative storytelling to help their patients make sense of their world. In fact, it's been said that we are our narratives.

 

This is interesting! Would be fun to use it for writing fiction too - unreliable narrators and all that!


Via Sharon Bakar
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How to create magical corporate story moments - Sticky Communication

How to create magical corporate story moments - Sticky Communication | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

As someone who has been telling corporate stories for many years, let me interrupt with an emergency news flash. Yes, storytelling is the best way to capture attention, hearts and memories and make your point. But it’s much more difficult than other forms of nonfiction writing.
Just like in a story, though, the higher the mountain, the more rewarding the quest.


Via Gregg Morris
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