Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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Every Noise at Once

All the world's music genres in one map (with an example to listen to for each genre!): http://everynoise.com/engenremap.html ;

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How Repetition in Music Affects Your Thinking

How Repetition in Music Affects Your Thinking | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
If you’re wondering why a particular song is catchy, it may be because you’ve heard it before on the radio, in a store, on a soundtrack. Elizabeth Hellmuth Margullis, director of the Music Cognition Lab at the University of Arkansas, says that repetition creates an opening for the listener to become imagined participants in the song. In this TED video she’s quoted as saying, “Repetition gives rise to a kind of orientation to sound that we think of as distinctively musical where we’re listening along with the sound, engaging imaginatively with the note about to happen.” Repetition also allows the listener to notice new things.
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Analysing characterisation in operatic arias

Analysing characterisation in operatic arias | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A guide to analysing operatic arias with the emphasis on techniques of musical characterisation. 1. a blank template 2. an example of the template filled in. The blank template.     &nbsp...
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Study: Musical Training Teaches Us to Detect Our Own Mistakes and rapidly make needed adjustments

Study: Musical Training Teaches Us to Detect Our Own Mistakes and rapidly make needed adjustments | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
New research finds musical training appears to sharpen our ability to detect our own mistakes, and rapidly make needed adjustments.

Via Amira
Sharrock's insight:
Amira's insight:

"According to this research, people who spend many hours in the practice room not only process information unusually efficiently, but they also do a superior job of not letting occasional errors derail them.

These findings "suggest that playing a musical instrument might improve the ability to monitor our behavior and adjust our responses effectively when needed," (...) In addition, “higher levels of musical practice were also associated with a better engagement of cognitive control processes, as indicated by more efficient error and conflict detection,” the researchers report. Participants who had spent more quality time with their instruments had "a better ability to detect errors and conflicts, and a reduced reactiveness to these detected problems.” (...) In other words, if you hit a wrong note, it’s important to be immediately aware of what you did wrong, but it’s just as important to not hesitate or second-guess yourself. You quickly take stock what happened and move on—a skill the musicians in the study applied to these two tests, and one players can presumably apply to an assortment of everyday challenges."

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Amira's curator insight, October 20, 2013 6:20 AM

"According to this research, people who spend many hours in the practice room not only process information unusually efficiently, but they also do a superior job of not letting occasional errors derail them.

These findings "suggest that playing a musical instrument might improve the ability to monitor our behavior and adjust our responses effectively when needed," (...) In addition, “higher levels of musical practice were also associated with a better engagement of cognitive control processes, as indicated by more efficient error and conflict detection,” the researchers report. Participants who had spent more quality time with their instruments had "a better ability to detect errors and conflicts, and a reduced reactiveness to these detected problems.” (...) In other words, if you hit a wrong note, it’s important to be immediately aware of what you did wrong, but it’s just as important to not hesitate or second-guess yourself. You quickly take stock what happened and move on—a skill the musicians in the study applied to these two tests, and one players can presumably apply to an assortment of everyday challenges."

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‘Weird Al’ Yankovic’s strange and fruitful life

For “Weird Al” Yankovic, life is certainly good. After 13 albums and 30 years in the business of musical satire, he’s just released the bestselling record of his career.

It’s not exactly what the 14-year-old Alfred Matthew, writing goofy ditties on the accordion in his Lynwood bedroom back in the mid-1970s, might have imagined.

 


Via F. Thunus
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11 Musicians Who Also Happen To Be Comedy Geniuses | NME.COM

11 Musicians Who Also Happen To Be Comedy Geniuses | NME.COM | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Who says rock stars can't be funny, eh? Earlier this week, filmmaker Brett Morgen – the man behind the camera for this year's fantastic Kurt Cobain documentary Montage Of Heck – finally revealed the full details of the accompanying soundtrack album. And among all the snippets of unreleased material and rare tracks that range from "thrash to ragtime and everything in between", there'll also be a "sketch comedy routine". Of course, to anyone who's read any classic interviews with Cobain, this shouldn't be much of a surprise at all - for all the visceral rage and anger to his music, there was always a dry, sarcastic, hilarious side to his personality, too. He's not the only musician who's chanced his hand at comedy, either – here's 11 others who've tried putting down the guitar and to tickle your funny bone... 
Read more at http://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/11-musicians-who-also-happen-to-be-comedy-geniuses?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=comedy#d6p4FgLCKsqMctqQ.99

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How Music Can Improve Memory

How Music Can Improve Memory | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Songs and rhymes can be used to remember all kinds of information. A study just published in the journal Memory and Cognition finds that adults learned a new language more effectively when they sang the words instead of spoke them. Even great literature is susceptible to this treatment. Book Tunes, a collaboration between educational entrepreneur Jonathan Sauer and hip-hop artist Andy Bernstein (he performs under the name Abdominal), turns long, wordy books into compact, catchy raps, spoken over an insistent beat.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Music

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 21, 2015 7:22 PM
Songs and rhymes can be used to remember all kinds of information. A study just published in the journal Memory and Cognition finds that adults learned a new language more effectively when they sang the words instead of spoke them. Even great literature is susceptible to this treatment. Book Tunes, a collaboration between educational entrepreneur Jonathan Sauer and hip-hop artist Andy Bernstein (he performs under the name Abdominal), turns long, wordy books into compact, catchy raps, spoken over an insistent beat.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Music

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Searching for sultry jazz music [Archive] - MobileRead Forums

[Archive] Searching for sultry jazz music Lounge
Do you have any recommendations for sultry jazz music? In particular I'm searching for something that's similar to "What you feel (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFsFnzOCbKw)" from Buffy the Vampire Slayer's episode Once More With Feeling (the song itself isn't that great, but I like the style and I don't have any other examples at hand). 
Sharrock's insight:

I found this site after searching for the same, sultry jazz music like Nina Simone's "Feeling Good". 

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WATCH: Marching Band Turns Into Walking T. Rex, Eats Someone

WATCH: Marching Band Turns Into Walking T. Rex, Eats Someone | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Michael Jackson's moonwalk re-enacted by a marching band? That's so last week.
Sharrock's insight:

Creative

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