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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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35 Psychological Tricks To Help You Learn Better

35 Psychological Tricks To Help You Learn Better | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentations during your lectures? Urged your students to memorize more in order to remember more?
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don't know if there is anything to this...

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Overloaded with information, students need critical thinking skills - University World News

We must accept that we can no longer afford the luxury of believing that higher education exists in a ‘content delivery’ model. As Keeling articulated in Learning Reconsidered: A campus-wide focus on the student experience: “…knowledge is no longer a scarce – or stable – commodity. [It] is changing so rapidly that specific information may become obsolete before a studentgraduates and has the opportunity to apply it.”

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Based on the work of George Kuh and others, many institutions are placing an emphasis on ‘high-impact practices’. According to the report, College Learning for the New Global Century, these are “…teaching and learning practices that have been widely tested and have been shown to be beneficial for college students from many backgrounds”.

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Learning analytics don't just measure students' progress – they can shape it

Learning analytics don't just measure students' progress – they can shape it | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
From online forum debates to predictive essay writing software, data showing how students learn can help universities adapt their teaching

Via Grant Montgomery
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The Original Cupid Was a Sociopath | Bering in Mind, Scientific American Blog Network

The Original Cupid Was a Sociopath | Bering in Mind, Scientific American Blog Network | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

It was the Roman writer Lucius Apuleius who brought Cupid to life in his ancient book of fables, The Golden Ass. Apuleius’s Cupid was no mischievous toddler with hummingbird wings but an impulsive god who rejoiced in causing sexual havoc for all earthly creatures. Even the fearless Apollo refers to Cupid as “serpent dire and fierce”:

 

Sharrock's insight:

“The destiny of the world is determined less by the battles that are lost and won than by the stories it loves and believes in.” —Harold Goddard

 

Cupid isn't who he was. Children's folklore and fables are almost lost to popular culture. 

 

Cultural euphemisms and white washes hit Grimm's tales and now, apparently, Roman fables: "Apuleius’s Cupid wasn't so much a romantic matchmaker as a devil subjecting hapless people to a toxic lust, one that blinded them with hypersexual urges. This allegory of a capricious god who pierces mortal hearts only to burden them with some scandalous attraction out of sheer boredom or as favors to other gods is reminiscent of nature’s cold mindlessness when it comes to human sexuality. Individuals with the most deviant desires have similarly found themselves at the whim of a terrible randomness. To learn more about the science of “erotic outliers,”

 What other tales were censored or re-written and popularized? 

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5 Reasons to Calm Down Your Analytical Mind

5 Reasons to Calm Down Your Analytical Mind | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Your analytical mind comes with both advantages and disadvantages. There are certain situations where it's better to calm down too much thinking and rationality.
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Sharrock's curator insight, February 7, 1:55 PM

This is part of a useful cycle. You race the analytical mind to absorb knowledge and to explore information. Then you run the creative, associative mind to find connections between personal experiences, observations, and information. But too much of anything can be bad.

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List of Nobel laureates by country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of Nobel laureates by country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The present list ranks laureates under the country/countries that are stated by the Nobel Prize committee on its website. The list does not distinguish between laureates who got a full prize and the majority who got just a fraction of a prize.

Sharrock's insight:

I wonder if the PISAs offer valid indicators or predictors of military thinking and strategic skills or even for creativity. It strikes me that the USA still has the highest number of Nobel Prize Winners (http://www.whichcountry.co/top-10-countries-with-most-nobel-prize-winners-in-the-world/, orhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nobel_laureates_by_country). I wonder how this is explained? We could look at Nobel Science Winners per capita to consider other measureshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Nobel_laureates_per_capita. We could and should also research innovations and patents in terms of quantity and quality. I'm wondering about the quality of education may have a few more frames with which to really address the true issues of education in public schools (elementary or secondary) or in higher education (colleges and universities). However, this is not research I have done. I think getting to valid and useful answers will need some high levels of research skills and access.  less… 

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Research in Brain Function and Learning

Research in Brain Function and Learning | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
It is important for teachers and parents to understand that maturation of the brain influences learning readiness. For teachers, this is especially important when designing lessons and selecting which strategies to use.
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How to Get Students to Believe in Themselves | The New York Public Library

How to Get Students to Believe in Themselves | The New York Public Library | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How many times do you hear students in your classroom or library say, “I can’t”? Doesn’t that phrase make you cringe? I always tell students, "Don’t say that because you can,” and help them figure out ways to reach their goals.

Via Pamela D Lloyd
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Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, January 22, 1:46 AM

Such useful advice in so many contexts.

 

Now, eat your goldfish crackers!

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Learning to Learn - The Link

Learning to Learn - The Link | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Link
Learning to Learn
The Link
In 1956, a committee of educators, chaired by educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom, produced a classification of educational objectives.

Via John R. Walkup
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John R. Walkup's curator insight, January 7, 12:51 PM

Interesting discussion about Bloom's Taxonom yaimed at the university level.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 14, 6:25 PM

We can and students can. Bloom is rarely used in schools today.  We do critical thinking as a rote process and then wonder why students are not very adept at it. I used Bloom's regularly in the design of rubrics and discussed that with students.

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Harvard study finds learning music doesn’t make you smarter - The Boston Globe

Harvard study finds learning music doesn’t make you smarter - The Boston Globe | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
True or false? Music makes you smarter. Contrary to popular belief, a study — led by a Harvard graduate student who plays the saxophone, flute, bassoon, oboe, and clarinet — found no cognitive benefits to music lessons.
Sharrock's insight:

Music lesson cognition increases are a myth. "Instead of intelligence, they looked at a broad suite of tests, including core mathematical abilities, spatial navigation, and linguistic abilities. The study found no evidence of benefit, although it cannot rule out that music might have cognitive benefits, or that perhaps more classes could have an effect."

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Sharrock's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:12 PM

Music lesson cognition increases are a myth. "Instead of intelligence, they looked at a broad suite of tests, including core mathematical abilities, spatial navigation, and linguistic abilities. The study found no evidence of benefit, although it cannot rule out that music might have cognitive benefits, or that perhaps more classes could have an effect."

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What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble?

What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Knowledge comes into us through a variety of channels that can be blocked by our concern for status, and the successful knowledge-seeker will be one who keeps those channels open. The process requires that we be able to “listen,” either literally or figuratively, to what others say. If what they say shows them to be superior to us in knowledge, we will be hampered in our learning if our first reaction is to try to show that we know as much as they or more. The process also requires that we be corrigible, that we be open to the possibility that our opinions are in some way misguided. If, whenever our status as knowers is threatened by the specter of correction, we feel that we must prove ourselves to have been in the right, we will have closed off an avenue of knowledge and crippled ourselves as inquirers. It can be particularly galling, if one lacks intellectual humility, to be corrected in a public forum; and the galling can obstruct the process of learning.

 
Sharrock's insight:

The most important value for learners is humility, but it should not be considered the only value. Credibility should be held as another value, but also is not the only value of imporance.

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Reading Sage: Webb's Depth of Knowledge (DOK) | Bloom's Taxonomy vs. Norman Webb's depth of knowledge

The Common Core Standards are the cornerstones of the Smarter Balanced and PARCC assessments, Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (scale of cognitive demand) and Blooms Revised Taxonomy (levels of intellectual ability) are the framework and the structures that will be used to evaluate students. Assessing curriculum, developing formative assessments, evaluation curriculum, and evaluation of students knowledge at the highest levels is being shared by two progressive cognitive matrices. Depth of knowledge, and complexity of knowledge is the heart of the more rigorous assessments being implemented in 2014. They share many ideas and concepts yet are different in level of cognitive demand, level of difficulty, complexity of verbs vs. depth of thinking required, and the scale of cognitive demand. Teachers need to learn how the frameworks are used to develop curriculum and how to use them to enhance instructions. Teachers and students can use Blooms Questions Stems and Webb’s DOK questions stems to create higher order thinking and improve achievement. 80% of the PARCC assessments will be based on the highest levels of blooms and the deepest levels of Webb’s DOK. Are you ready to use the DOK or Blooms daily in your class? 

 The links below are a great resources of Blooms Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge.Levels of Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of KnowledgeHess’ Cognitive Rigor Matrix & Curricular Examples | Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy | Webb’s Depth of Knowledge GuideDepth of Knowledge: Assessing Curriculum with Depth and MeaningBlooms and Webb ComparisonDepth of Knowledge ConsistencyDeveloping Higher Order Thinking Questions Based on Webb’s DOK andFCAT Content ComplexityPARCC Transition Information: AIMS Test and Common CoreDOK Question StemsDepth of Knowledge (DOK) LevelsINTRODUCTION TO WEBB’S DEPTH-OF-KNOWLEDGE LEVELSMathematics Depth-of-Knowledge LevelsDepth-of-Knowledge Levels for Four Content Areas
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Links are useful as well as the exploration.

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Emotional Competency - Revenge

Getting Even
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6 Weeks to Superhero

6 Weeks to Superhero | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Excerpt:When I'm hired to get an athlete, bodybuilder, or actor into the best shape of his life – to strip him of virtually all body fat while adding 15 to 20 pounds of functional "show" muscle – I have hundreds, maybe thousands, of protocols I can use to help him reach that goal.
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Equations Are Art inside a Mathematician’s Brain

Equations Are Art inside a Mathematician’s Brain | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A brain area associated with emotional reactions to beauty activates when mathematicians view especially pleasing formulas
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Investigating mathematical beauty allowed the researchers to test the role of culture and learning in aesthetic appreciation. The scientists hypothesized that while people with no musical or artistic training can still appreciate Beethoven’s and Michelangelo's works, only those who understand the meaning behind certain mathematical formulas would find them beautiful."

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Four Things Writers Can Learn From Fairy Tales (Besides Never Eat The Free Apple) - Writer's Relief, Inc.

Four Things Writers Can Learn From Fairy Tales (Besides Never Eat The Free Apple) - Writer's Relief, Inc. | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
These four simple lessons from fairy tales could change the way you write your story, improve your craft and technique!

Via Ruth Long
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Using Data to Guide Instruction and Improve Student Learning - SEDL Letter, Linking Research and Practice, Volume XXII, Number 2

Using Data to Guide Instruction and Improve Student Learning - SEDL Letter, Linking Research and Practice, Volume XXII, Number 2 | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Research has shown that using data in instructional decisions can lead to improved student performance (Wayman, 2005; Wayman, Cho, & Johnston, 2007; Wohlstetter, Datnow, & Park, 2008). No single assessment can tell educators all they need to know to make well-informed instructional decisions, so researchers stress the use of multiple data sources. Generally, schools collect enormous amounts of data on students’ attendance, behavior, and performance, as well as administrative data and perceptual data from surveys and focus groups. But when it comes to improving instruction and learning, it’s not the quantity of the data that counts, but how the information is used (Hamilton et al., 2009).

 
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30 Life Hacks Debunked - mental_floss on YouTube (Ep. 30) - YouTube

Ever wonder how many of those life hacks you see online really work? +Mental Floss  puts them to the test (albeit with a few flaws). Despite the title of the video, they only wind up debunking some of them!

 

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The 20 Most Common Logical Fallacies We Fall Victim to Everyday

Try your best to identify these logical fallacies in your own life and correct your faulty thinking.
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The 10,000-Hours Myth: What It Really Takes To Be An Expert

The 10,000-Hours Myth: What It Really Takes To Be An Expert | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The '10,000-hour rule' — that this level of practice holds the secret to great success in any field — has become sacrosanct gospel, echoed on websites and recited as litany in high-performance workshops. The problem: it’s only half true. If you are a duffer at golf, say, and make the same mistakes every time you try a certain swing or putt, 10,000 hours of practicing that error will not improve your game. You’ll still be a duffer, albeit an older one. No less an expert than Anders Ericsson, the Florida State University psychologist whose research on expertise spawned the 10,000-hour rule of thumb, 'You don’t get benefits from mechanical repetition, but by adjusting your execution over and over to get closer to your goal. You have to tweak the system by pushing,' he adds, 'allowing for more errors at first as you increase your limits.'” | by Maria Popova

 


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Here Are 97 Books, Articles, And Movies That Will Make You Smarter

Here Are 97 Books, Articles, And Movies That Will Make You Smarter | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Here's a great list of titles that will test your brain and challenge the way see you the world.
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Grades 2.0: How Learning Analytics Are Changing The Teacher's Role - Edudemic

Grades 2.0: How Learning Analytics Are Changing The Teacher's Role - Edudemic | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Educators, have you ever wondered if your students are really learning when you teach? Soon you’ll have to wonder no more.

Via Grant Montgomery
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Game developer focuses on social emotional learning (podcast) - CNET

Game developer focuses on social emotional learning (podcast) - CNET | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Game developer focuses on social emotional learning (podcast) CNET Trip Hawkins, the founder of Electronic Arts and EA Sports, is turning his attention to social emotional learning with a new game to help 6- to 12-year-olds develop social skills...
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30 years of little girls learning dance moves from music videos

30 years of little girls learning dance moves from music videos | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Click to see the pic and write a comment...
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Too Much Awareness Can Be a Bad Thing

Every now and then it's good to step back and reflect on ourselves and the state of our lives, but too much awareness can be a bad thing too.
Sharrock's insight:

The push back against the mindfulness trend.

 

As with everything else, moderation is the word when dealing with awareness.

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