Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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18 Habits Of Highly Creative People

18 Habits Of Highly Creative People | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Creative people are insatiably curious — they generally opt to live the examined life, and even as they get older, maintain a sense of curiosity about life. Whether through intense conversation or solitary mind-wandering, creatives look at the world around them and want to know why, and how, it is the way it is.

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The Daily Routine Of Creativity -

The Daily Routine Of Creativity - | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Daily Routine Of Creativity by TeachThought Staff What sort of habits lead to creativity? Well, we first have to imagine these kinds of habits as causal–that is, the habits cause the creativity, rather than...

Via Adrian Bertolini, Lynnette Van Dyke
Sharrock's insight:

This is nice to use to support whatever style and habits you use to create. We all need our magic feathers to motivate and encourage us towards completing unstructured tasks. It strikes me though that the chart says nothing definite at all. Some of the creatives had "day jobs", some did not. Some were literary creatives while others were musical or  were visual/2-D artists while others still are philosophers. Then there are the one or two scientists (depending on how you describe the method Freud uses compared to Darwin's method).

 

What is missing? How do we characterize "creative work"? Is this only the production part of the creativity or does it include the creative's research? For example, many writers research by reading the works of of others to explore how certain effects are achieved. Others research into how certain characters might have achieved the social/emotional/intellectual points they have achieved. Domain-specific creativity may have commonalities within the domains. We are not seeing what these are by ignoring the "work" or "study" of creativity. I will have to read the study cited here.

 

In other words, other than the suggestion that we should suspend our disbelief and critical thinking skills to accept that "Well, we first have to imagine these kinds of habits as causal–that is, the habits cause the creativity, rather than the reverse", there really doesn't appear to be any obvious takeaways that support the statement that you need rest, exercise, and creative activity. Mozart didn't need exercise apparently. Neither did Franklyn nor O'Connor nor Balzac (and there are others). I would consider Franklyn, O'Connor, and Mozart as the genius's geniuses. Although I have no idea who Corbusier is--I'll have to Google him/her--I can't see why we are being directed to this chart as though it is evidence supporting anything. The disclaimer basically says the same thing: "Disclaimer: The above info doesn’t characterize the entire life of each person but a specific period of time as recorded in diaries, letters and other documentation." If you are someone on the lookout for the narrative fallacy, this would set off flags. 


But I know how it can happen that the summary of a document leaves out the important points and methodology, including a larger population size charted out possibly. It might indicate that the authors read the much larger document, and assumed that the summary was enough.


I will have to read the larger document. The summary was not enough.


I am interested in the topic though. I am on the lookout for studies that explore the influence of daily schedules and habits on creative productivity. 

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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, March 8, 2015 7:07 PM

Fascinating to see how some of the world's most creative individuals structured their day

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Craving This At Work? What Your Body REALLY Wants | CAREEREALISM

Craving This At Work? What Your Body REALLY Wants | CAREEREALISM | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Having trouble holding back from certain cravings? Your body could be suffering from deficiencies. Here are some yummy alternatives!
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Creative Thinking Habits

Creative Thinking Habits | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"A habit to consciously cultivate is the habit of keeping a written record of your creativity attempts in a notebook, on file cards, or in your computer. A record not only guarantees that the thoughts and ideas will last, since they are committed to paper or computer files, but it will also goad you into other thoughts and ideas. The simple act of recording his ideas enabled Leonardo Da Vinci to dwell on his ideas and improve them over time by elaborating on them."(excerpt)

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The Habits of the World's Smartest People (Infographic)

The Habits of the World's Smartest People (Infographic) | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
You don't have to be a genius to act like one. Pick up some of these habits of people with high IQs.

Via Tom Tang, RAC
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We're All Hypnotized: How to Override Your Automatic Behaviors

You're only conscious of a small fraction of your thoughts, emotions, habits, and choices. The rest of it happens in your brain unconsciously, without any effort on your part. In this way, a lot of us are hypnotized for most of the time.
Sharrock's insight:

How hard is this? I think there is a kind of inertia involved with breaking out of habits and automatic behaviors. 

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