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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The Mind of the Prodigy | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

The Mind of the Prodigy | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Prodigies dazzle us with their virtuoso violin concertos, seemingly prescient chess moves, and vivid paintings. While their work would be enough to impress us if they ...
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excerpt: "More striking is that every single prodigy scored off the charts in working memory — better than 99 percent of the general population. In fact, six out of the eight prodigies scored at the 99.9th percentile! Working memory isn’t solely the ability to memorize a string of digits. That’s short-term memory. Instead, working memory involves the ability to hold information in memory while being able to manipulate and process other incoming information. On the Stanford-Binet IQ test, working memory is measured in both the verbal and non-verbal domains and includes tasks such as processing sentences while having to remember the last word of each sentence, and recalling the location of blocks and numbers in the correct order in which they were presented. There have been many descriptions of the phenomenal working memory of prodigies, including a historical description of Mozart that involves his superior ability to memorize musical pieces and manipulate scores in his head. (See here for a demonstration of the exceptional memory of a physics prodigy.)"

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Smarter Than Others | High Ability / Gifted Adults

Smarter Than Others | High Ability / Gifted Adults | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
What happens if you realize you are smarter and more capable than most people? Do you celebrate being exceptional, or try to hide?

 

One of the many inspiring quotes by Steve Jobs: "Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you, and you can change it, you can influence it, you can build your own things that other people can use."

 

But Jobs also recognized he was exceptional. “It was a very big moment that’s burned into my mind. When I realized that I was smarter than my parents..."


Via Douglas Eby, Lynnette Van Dyke
Sharrock's insight:

I stumble across people like this who chose "to hide" often. They are often powerfully motivated, but they are also separate from others. It looks like survivor's guilt, mixed with something else. When I recognize them as a-gifted-in-hiding, I wonder how or if I should share that recognition. Sometimes, I think they want to be "outed" while other times, I'm not sure. There is always that mix of envy and jealousy I feel when I encounter one of them. You do want to ask "what are you doing here?" or "why aren't you out curing cancer?" or "You could have been famous?" But then it occurs to you that the point of hiding is its own answer to those questions. So, why bother asking if the answer is so obvious? 

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Sharrock's curator insight, August 19, 2013 9:55 AM

I stumble across people like this who chose "to hide" often. They are often powerfully motivated, but they are also separate from others. It looks like survivor's guilt, mixed with something else. When I recognize them as a-gifted-in-hiding, I wonder how or if I should share that recognition. Sometimes, I think they want to be "outed" while other times, I'm not sure. There is always that mix of envy and jealousy I feel when I encounter one of them. You do want to ask "what are you doing here?" or "why aren't you out curing cancer?" or "You could have been famous?" But then it occurs to you that the point of hiding is its own answer to those questions. So, why bother asking if the answer is so obvious? 

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Cute Three-Year-Old from Ireland Is Golf Genius, Possible New Rory McIlroy? - Bleacher Report

Cute Three-Year-Old from Ireland Is Golf Genius, Possible New Rory McIlroy? - Bleacher Report | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Cute Three-Year-Old from Ireland Is Golf Genius, Possible New Rory McIlroy?
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TY! @drseide for Child Prodigies: A Unique Form of Autism? - Psych Central News

TY! @drseide for  Child Prodigies: A Unique Form of Autism? - Psych Central News | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A study of eight child prodigies suggests a significant link between their special abilities and autism.

 

“The link between child prodigies and autism is strong in our study,” said Joanne Ruthsatz, Ph.D., lead author of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Ohio State University.

“Our findings suggest child prodigies have traits in common with autistic children, but something is preventing them from displaying the deficits we associate with the disorder.”

Of the eight prodigies who took part in the study, three had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. As a whole, the prodigies also tended to have slightly higher scores on a test of autistic traits, when compared to a control group.

Furthermore, half of the prodigies had a family member or a first- or second-degree relative with autism.

Ruthsatz said it is surprising that half of the families and three of the prodigies themselves were affected by autism since autism occurs in only one of 120 individuals.

Researchers also found that while child prodigies had higher general intelligence scores, where they really excelled was in working memory—they all scored above the 99th percentile on this trait.


Via Lou Salza
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