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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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10 Pseudo-Science Theories We'd Like to See Retired Forever

10 Pseudo-Science Theories We'd Like to See Retired Forever | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Pseudo-science theories are a little like puppies. They're fun, fluffy things to talk about, and most of the time they're harmless. Sometimes, however, they get big, mean, aggressive, and have to be put down. Here are a few pseudo-science theories that need the Old Yeller treatment.
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▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 4:49 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Research Update: The Current State of Research Use in Education - SEDL Letter, Linking Research and Practice, Volume XXII, Number 2

Research Update: The Current State of Research Use in Education - SEDL Letter, Linking Research and Practice, Volume XXII, Number 2 | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Since the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), there has been an increased focus on using evidence-based practice to improve education and student learning. This movement encourages educators to use instructional strategies backed by scientifically based research—specifically, randomized controlled trials and other types of rigorous research that address questions of effectiveness. Educators are also encouraged to use student and other types of data to guide decisions. In short, educators are being asked to do “what works.”

Researchers are examining the circumstances under which educators use evidence, what factors encourage and discourage the use of evidence, and how to create a school environment conducive to the use of evidence. 

Because of the increased demand for evidence-based practices in education, the amount of rigorous education research has increased. Taking the next step, researchers have now begun looking at educators’ use of this research. Specifically, researchers are examining the circumstances under which educators use evidence, what factors encourage and discourage the use of evidence, and how to create a school environment conducive to the use of evidence.

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Educators have reported a number of factors that influenced whether they were likely to use research. The factors listed here, although not comprehensive, include those mentioned in several research studies or literature reviews."

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What Makes Malcolm Gladwell Fascinating

What Makes Malcolm Gladwell Fascinating | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Challenging our assumptions is what Malcolm Gladwell does best. To see how he does it, let’s take a look at what Davis called The Index of the Interesting. Davis classified 12 different ways of challenging conventional wisdom, and Gladwell’s key ideas map beautifully onto at least five of them.

Sharrock's insight:

These five key ideas are helpful when exploring concepts and research. The author's analysis also helps me consider ways to improve my wriring.

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