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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The big steal: rise of the plagiarist in the digital age

The big steal: rise of the plagiarist in the digital age | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Thanks to the internet, it has never been easier to steal other people's work. There's also a high risk you'll be found out. So why do it?
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Why Can't We All Just Get Along? The Uncertain Biological Basis of Morality

Why Can't We All Just Get Along? The Uncertain Biological Basis of Morality | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Squaring recent research suggesting we're "naturally moral" with all the strife in the world. 

In 1999, Joshua Greene—then a philosophy graduate student at Princeton, now a psychology professor at Harvard—had a very fertile idea. He took a pretty well-known philosophical thought experiment and infused it with technology in a way that turned it into a very well-known philosophical thought experiment—easily the best-known, most-pondered such mental exercise of our time. In the process, he raised doubts, in inescapably vivid form, about the rationality of human moral judgment.

The thought experiment—called the trolley problem—has over the past few years gotten enough attention to be approaching “needs no introduction” status. But it’s not quite there, so: An out-of-control trolley is headed for five people who will surely die unless you pull a lever that diverts it onto a track where it will instead kill one person. Would you—should you—pull the lever?


Via Alessandro Cerboni, FastTFriend
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NOVA | The Hippocratic Oath Today

NOVA | The Hippocratic Oath Today | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Read classical and modern versions of the oath and a short article about its controversial nature today.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Yet paradoxically, even as the modern oath's use has burgeoned, its content has tacked away from the classical oath's basic tenets. According to a 1993* survey of 150 U.S. and Canadian medical schools, for example, only 14 percent of modern oaths prohibit euthanasia, 11 percent hold convenant with a deity, 8 percent foreswear abortion, and a mere 3 percent forbid sexual contact with patients—all maxims held sacred in the classical version. The original calls for free tuition for medical students and for doctors never to "use the knife" (that is, conduct surgical procedures)—both obviously out of step with modern-day practice. Perhaps most telling, while the classical oath calls for "the opposite" of pleasure and fame for those who transgress the oath, fewer than half of oaths taken today insist the taker be held accountable for keeping the pledge."

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Cheating [Is] the System

Cheating [Is] the System | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Worldwide, the choice is clear, if not easy: Does it make more sense to accept that the system has become so perverted that success requires cheating?
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "This year, 54 proctors from around China had been brought in to Zhongxiang with a mission: Prevent cheating. It was a reaction to the discovery last year that 99 students in that testing facility had turned in identical papers. Officials had decided that something needed to be done.

The proctors used metal detectors to find transmitters. Male and female students were frisked, and cell phones found in underwear were confiscated. During the test, patrols around the site uncovered groups trying to radio messages to students taking the test."

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NOVA | Dilemmas of Wartime Medicine

NOVA | Dilemmas of Wartime Medicine | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
With their allegiance to both the Hippocratic Oath and military guidelines, how do combat doctors decide whom to treat?
Sharrock's insight:

The article mentions a dilemma and decision making. Students may develop their critical thinking skills with discussion about this article.

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