Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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What is America’s Ideology?

What is America’s Ideology? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There are four primary ideologies espoused in the United States.  We usually discuss them from a left-to-right perspective, so that is how they’ll be presented here.  First off, an ideology is a clear, coherent, and consistent set of beliefs about the role of government and its relationship with the individual.  Those on the left side of the ideological scale tend to believe in more federal government involvement, while those on the right side of the scale believe in a federal government that is smaller in size and scope.  We will look at the four primary ideologies (socialism, liberalism, conservatism, libertarianism) from an economic perspective.  The crux of each is founded on economic principles and government’s reach within the economy.  When social issues (i.e. gay marriage, abortion) or the military are discussed, that consistency which makes up the fundamental makeup of an ideology gets clouded.  Here are some brief descriptions of the four ideologies:
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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....
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Knowledge worker - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Knowledge worker

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page . Knowledge workers are workers whose main capital is knowledge. Typical examples may include software engineers, doctors, architects, engineers, scientists, public accountants, lawyers, and teachers, because they "think for a living".

Another, more recent breakdown of knowledge work (author unknown) shows activity that ranges from tasks performed by individual knowledge workers to global social networks. This framework spans every class of knowledge work that is being or is likely to be undertaken. There are seven levels or scales of knowledge work, with references for each are cited.

Knowledge work (e.g., writing, analyzing, advising) is performed by subject-matter specialists in all areas of an organization. Although knowledge work began with the origins of writing and counting, it was first identified as a category of work by Drucker (1973).[15]Knowledge functions (e.g., capturing, organizing, and providing access to knowledge) are performed by technical staff, to support knowledge processes projects. Knowledge functions date from c. 450 BC, with the Library of Alexandria,[dubious – discuss] but their modern roots can be linked to the emergence of information management in the 1970s.[16]Knowledge processes (preserving, sharing, integration) are performed by professional groups, as part of a knowledge management program. Knowledge processes have evolved in concert with general-purpose technologies, such as the printing press, mail delivery, the telegraph, telephone networks, and the Internet.[17]Knowledge management programs link the generation of knowledge (e.g., from science, synthesis, or learning) with its use (e.g., policy analysis, reporting, program management) as well as facilitating organizational learning and adaptation in a knowledge organization. Knowledge management emerged as a discipline in the 1990s (Leonard, 1995)[full citation needed].Knowledge organizations transfer outputs (content, products, services, and solutions), in the form of knowledge services, to enable external use. The concept of knowledge organizations emerged in the 1990s.[13]Knowledge services support other organizational services, yield sector outcomes, and result in benefits for citizens in the context of knowledge markets. Knowledge services emerged as a subject in the 2000s.[18]Social media networks enable knowledge organizations to co-produce knowledge outputs by leveraging their internal capacity with massive social networks. Social networking emerged in the 2000s [19]

The hierarchy ranges from the effort of individual specialists, through technical activity, professional projects, and management programs, to organizational strategy, knowledge markets, and global-scale networking.

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How do you like the Long Emergency so far...........?

How do you like the Long Emergency so far...........? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
James Howard Kunstler is one of my favourite writers.  No one has such a way with words, incisive, cynical, sarcastic, derisive, humorous, and also well written full of wit and clever imagery.........
Sharrock's insight:

This is not an optimistic TED talk. It does get one thinking and there is a need to research his conclusions and suggestions.

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The Hacker Economy

The Hacker Economy | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The new economy that’s emerging now is the hacker economy, where brands become platforms rather than products and ordinary people use open source technology to create their own products.
Sharrock's insight:

This is a valuable description of the progression of the major ways people produce wealth. It provides insights into the evolution of "work".

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Katie Gilbertson's curator insight, May 15, 2014 9:39 AM

What has work become?! I think it's insane that hacking is becoming such a big deal and a way that people "earn" money

Alyssa Serrano's comment, May 22, 2014 4:46 PM
I think that it's crazy how hacking is a way people can make money now
Alyssa Serrano's comment, May 22, 2014 4:46 PM
I think that it's crazy how hacking is a way people can make money now
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Four Revolutions Compared: Agriculture, Industry, Information, and APM — Metamodern

Four Revolutions Compared: Agriculture, Industry, Information, and APM — Metamodern | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The following table is excerpted from the new report, NANO: Nano-Solutions for the 21st Century (the full report is available from the Oxford Martin School here). “HT-APM” refers to high-throughput atomically precise manufacturing, a critical development on the horizon of
Sharrock's insight:

I really like this page for the chart and the language of the chart. The way it is organized, it seems to suggest that autonomous and semi-autonomous robotics (industrial and personal) as a "new means of processing information" in that the sensors and algorithms process information and drive the execution of automated processes. I recognize that the author is suggesting that the industrial revolution includes autonomous and semi-autonomous robotics with "exploiting the potential of artificial mechanical systems on a human scale", ultimately redefining (or re-framing) what  historians have termed the "Industrial Revolution" to include artificial intelligence (to a limited degree) and robots. This chart suggests that this the world is in the midst of The Industrial Revolution even as the Information Revolution and the beginnings of The APM Revolution. The chart was apparently used in a larger study though, so, to do it justice, I should read the report.

 

 

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Singularity 1 on 1: Jeremy Rifkin on the Zero Marginal Cost Society and the Decline of Capitalism

Singularity 1 on 1: Jeremy Rifkin on the Zero Marginal Cost Society and the Decline of Capitalism | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A one-of-a-kind conversation with Jeremy Rifkin discussing “The Zero Marginal Cost Society” and the decline of capitalism.

Via Spaceweaver
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Spaceweaver's curator insight, June 30, 2014 11:30 AM

Interesting and a must read...

Wally Stump's curator insight, August 3, 2014 10:56 AM

Some very interesting conversation about the future of capitalism and economics in the 21st century.

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Are U.S. Students Ready to Compete? : Education Next

It has been argued that the overall past success of the U.S. economy suggests that high-school math performance is not that critical for sustained growth in economic productivity. After all, U.S. students trailed their peers in the very first international survey undertaken nearly 50 years ago. That is the wrong message to take away however. Other factors contributed to the relatively high rate of growth in economic productivity during the last half of the 20th century, including the openness of the country’s markets, respect for property rights, low levels of political corruption, and limited intrusion of government into the operations of the marketplace. The United States, moreover, has always benefited from the in-migration of talent from abroad.

Sharrock's insight:

For a few days now, I've been wondering about the relationship of a nation's Nobel Prize winners to PISA scores. I finally decided to ask the question in Google. Here's one hit: "Clearly the countries with the worst PISA scores are those with the most impressive Nobel record. Equally significant, the correlation between PISA performance and GDP per capita is, as both Baker and Chang suggest, rather weak (less than 0.5)." http://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/jeremy-fox/are-pisa-scores-really-that-important.

 

But this article also presents an interesting exploration. 

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What comes after the knowledge era?

What comes after the knowledge era? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Can someone please tell me what comes after the knowledge era? This post illustrates then, that whichever era we think we are living in, and whether this is even a topic of interest, is quite rele...
Sharrock's insight:

from the article/response: "Drucker’s “Post Capitalist Society” is a recommended primer.  In it, Drucker asserts that in a knowledge-intensive economy much hinges on being able to increase productivity of knowledge work in much the same way as Frederick Winslow Taylor (1856-1915) dramatically improved work processes and output of manual labour in the industrial era.  He makes the point that the means of exponential improvement will lie, not in the breaking down of tasks to gain efficiencies as Taylor advocated and Henry Ford applied, but rather in the harnessing of intangible assets held by and within knowledge workers."

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