Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
Curated by Sharrock
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Cake, Coffee and Death

Cake, Coffee and Death | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

There is a quiet revolution going on in terms of attitudes towards death. What had become, until relatively recently, a taboo topic is starting to enjoy greater coverage and understanding with movements such as Death Cafés, of which more later, encouraging engagement with all its varied aspects. And as attitudes change, so too does the marketing of those companies which cater to consumers’ needs around death.

 

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Death Cafés, events for discussing mortality while also celebrating life, are creating new opportunities for people and businesses. By Ashley Gage and Megan Mooney."

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What on earth is a death cafe?

What on earth is a death cafe? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A chat about life's end over coffee and cake doesn't sound like everyone's cup of tea. But could it be a way to get people talking about a subject we can't escape and is often avoided?
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We've Built Driverless Cars. Can We Build Their Drivers?

We've Built Driverless Cars. Can We Build Their Drivers? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The most dangerous moment in a self-driving car involves no immediate or obvious peril.
Sharrock's insight:

This article could be used for discussions about technology, especially for artificial intelligence, robots, and autonomous vehicles. Questions and challenges.

 

from the article: "Thrust back into control while going full-speed on the freeway, the driver might be unable to take stock of all the obstacles on the road, or she might still be expecting her computer to do something it can't. Her reaction speed might be slower than if she'd been driving all along, she might be distracted by the email she was writing or she might choose not to take over at all, leaving a confused car in command. There's also the worry that people's driving skills will rapidly deteriorate as they come to rely on their robo-chauffeurs."


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What Makes Malcolm Gladwell Fascinating

What Makes Malcolm Gladwell Fascinating | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Challenging our assumptions is what Malcolm Gladwell does best. To see how he does it, let’s take a look at what Davis called The Index of the Interesting. Davis classified 12 different ways of challenging conventional wisdom, and Gladwell’s key ideas map beautifully onto at least five of them.

Sharrock's insight:

These five key ideas are helpful when exploring concepts and research. The author's analysis also helps me consider ways to improve my wriring.

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In praise of meddling kids | Rationalist Association

In praise of meddling kids | Rationalist Association | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The intrepid debunking teens – and a dog – make Scooby Doo ideal rationalist TV, says Myra Zepf
Sharrock's insight:

An administrator might use this show (Scooby Doo) to discuss data analysis as a kind of debunking of superstitious, party lines to explore rational explanations. Where is learning taking place? What is not working? How can we improve practices? Let's be those meddling kids!

 

This was an easy but valuable read. I found it entertaining and informative. Can this find its way into a secondary school classroom? I think so. I think it would work as non-fictional reading in any subject. It introduces useful terms as well: double-entendre, rationalism, superstition, per se, and intrepid. It could also help to distinguish betweeen plot and story in that the old Scooby Doo tv series had the same plot repeatedly but the story details changed slightly. A classroom could discuss how many other tv show series were "formulaic." Is this a bad thing or a good thing? This could also lead to questioning if something can be "bad" or "good". After all, a show designed for entertainment achieves its goals when there is an audience. This could lead to questioning and ways to construct an appropriate question? elements of an appropriate question. Open versus closed questions? etc.

 

From the article: "It’s not that Scooby-Doo has another "adult" level that I can suddenly decipher. There are no double-entendres for me to snigger at or references above my children’s heads. What they see and understand is what I see and understand. Only now, as an adult, I have a wider context within which to place it."

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How to Have an Honest Data-Driven Debate

How to Have an Honest Data-Driven Debate | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Ask each side to make their opponents' argument. (How to play fair with statistics http://t.co/Czw2BQlvMy)

Via Bill Bentley
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Bill Bentley's curator insight, April 20, 2014 10:13 AM

This is a bit dry but it's well written and staggeringly useful.   If we all practiced this technique, the irrational polarization of our politics (both community and company) and news would come to a screeching halt. Those of you who *think* you make data based decisions should read this and see if you really do!

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What Does GMO Labeling Mean For You?

What Does GMO Labeling Mean For You? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Having I-522 on the ballot proves that Americans want to know what's in their food and has sparked a debate between both sides.
Sharrock's insight:

This is something a science or social studies teacher in secondary schools might find useful as a common core non-fiction resource. It is informative about genetically-modified food, legal information, and science with legal connections are valuable. Students might discuss pros and cons of GMOs and may possibly discuss Monsanto (http://www.monsanto.com/Pages/default.aspx) and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monsanto in terms of genetically modified food controversies. This is a case also of law and policiy-making trying to keep up with technological innovations. 

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» 15 Common Cognitive Distortions - Psych Central

» 15 Common Cognitive Distortions - Psych Central | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
What's a cognitive distortion and why do so many people have them? Cognitive distortions are simply ways that our mind convinces us of something that isn't
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Rent vs. Buy: Why Buying a House Generally Wins

Rent vs. Buy: Why Buying a House Generally Wins | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Motley Fool - A few simple figures cut through the rent-vs.-buy debate.
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