Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
2.7K views | +3 today
Follow
Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Trouble With Tradition

The Trouble With Tradition | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In countries around the world, Human Rights Watch has documented how discriminatory elements of traditions and customs have impeded, rather than enhanced, people’s social, political, civil, cultural, and economic rights.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Ahead Of Pope's U.S. Visit, Survey Finds Many Catholics Disagree With Church On LGBT Families

Ahead Of Pope's U.S. Visit, Survey Finds Many Catholics Disagree With Church On LGBT Families | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Just weeks ahead of Pope Francis’ visit to the United States for the World Meeting of Families, a major international Catholic festival that kicks off Sept.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

About Liberty Fund - Online Library of Liberty

Liberty Fund, Inc. is a private, educational foundation established in 1960 to encourage the study of the ideal of a society of free and responsible individuals. The Foundation develops, supervises, and finances its own educational activities to foster thought and encourage discourse on enduring intellectual issues pertaining to liberty.

This is done through the implementation of different programs:

Each year, Liberty Fund conducts over 150 conferences throughout the United States, Canada, Latin America, and Europe.
Liberty Fund publishes about 10 - often classic - books each year. There is an online catalog where these books can be ordered.
Liberty Fund has produced video and audio tapes including The Intellectual Portrait Series of videotapes and DVDs which records conversations with some of the most significant thinkers of our time.
These programs focus on the place individual liberty has in an intellectual heritage evident from ancient times and continuing through our own times. The programs are intended to enrich understanding and appreciation of the complex nature of a society of free and responsible individuals and to contribute to its preservation.

Liberty Fund also sponsors the following websites:

Liberty Fund’s main website
The Online Library of Liberty
Library of Economics and Liberty
Online Library of Law & Liberty
As a tax-exempt, private operating foundation, Liberty Fund’s purposes are educational. It does not, therefore, engage in political action of any kind. It fulfills its mission by conducting programs, not by awarding grants to outside organizations or individuals.
Sharrock's insight:

shared via@E.L. Beck

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Translation is not just about language. It’s la...

Translation is not just about language. It’s la... | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Translation is not just about language. It’s largely about culture and creativity, says Mini Krishnan. (Translation is not just about language. (Translation is not just about language.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Original Cupid Was a Sociopath | Bering in Mind, Scientific American Blog Network

The Original Cupid Was a Sociopath | Bering in Mind, Scientific American Blog Network | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

It was the Roman writer Lucius Apuleius who brought Cupid to life in his ancient book of fables, The Golden Ass. Apuleius’s Cupid was no mischievous toddler with hummingbird wings but an impulsive god who rejoiced in causing sexual havoc for all earthly creatures. Even the fearless Apollo refers to Cupid as “serpent dire and fierce”:

 

Sharrock's insight:

“The destiny of the world is determined less by the battles that are lost and won than by the stories it loves and believes in.” —Harold Goddard

 

Cupid isn't who he was. Children's folklore and fables are almost lost to popular culture. 

 

Cultural euphemisms and white washes hit Grimm's tales and now, apparently, Roman fables: "Apuleius’s Cupid wasn't so much a romantic matchmaker as a devil subjecting hapless people to a toxic lust, one that blinded them with hypersexual urges. This allegory of a capricious god who pierces mortal hearts only to burden them with some scandalous attraction out of sheer boredom or as favors to other gods is reminiscent of nature’s cold mindlessness when it comes to human sexuality. Individuals with the most deviant desires have similarly found themselves at the whim of a terrible randomness. To learn more about the science of “erotic outliers,”

 What other tales were censored or re-written and popularized? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
By encouraging employees to both seek and provide help, rewarding givers, and screening out takers, companies can reap significant and lasting benefits. A McKinsey Quarterly article.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "The importance of helping-behavior for organizational effectiveness stretches far beyond intelligence work. Evidence from studies led by Indiana University’s Philip Podsakoff demonstrates that the frequency with which employees help one another predicts sales revenues in pharmaceutical units and retail stores; profits, costs, and customer service in banks; creativity in consulting and engineering firms; productivity in paper mills; and revenues, operating efficiency, customer satisfaction, and performance quality in restaurants."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from The Science and Art of Motivation
Scoop.it!

Drivers of Beliefs and Motivation in America, Classic to Current

Drivers of Beliefs and Motivation in America, Classic to Current | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Can you define the heavy influence of place, ethnicity and culture on our beliefs, motivation and behaviors as Americans?  

 

"..most people cannot tell you much about regional differences..."

 

The author focuses on current issues of gun control, stand-your-ground laws and other violence related 2012-2013 topics, as well as political, social issues.

 

________________________
   
Among the eleven regional cultures, there are two superpowers [who] ...shape continental debate: Yankeedom and Deep South.

   

____________________________

       

From the book, American Nations, by Colin Woodard, 2011
        

YANKEEDOM -  Founded by Calvinists as a new Zion, social engineering, denial of self for the common good, and assimilation of outsiders. Prizes education and broad citizen participation in politics and government to guard against aristocrats and tyrants. Full of cities and towns.

      

NEW NETHERLAND - Dutch roots, materialistic, tolerant, defends public institutions and rejects evangelical prescriptions for individual behavior. More interested in making money than in Yankee moralizing.

       

THE MIDLANDS. Founded by English Quakers, open-minded and less inclined toward activist government than Yankeedom.  (Others describe as personally moral but indifference to social corruption and military violence.) 

     

TIDEWATER. English gentry roots, semi-feudal, respects authority and tradition, tends to devalue equality or public participation in politics.   Barely any towns — planters delivered supplies to estates up Chesapeake’s tributaries.  Once ruled supreme but was hemmed in and saw its clout fade.

      

GREATER APPALACHIA. Irish, English, Scottish roots, lampooned as hillbilly and redneck haven, warrior ethic, personal sovereignty and individual liberty. Shifts alliances depending on who is the greatest threat to their freedom. 

      

DEEP SOUTH. Via English slave lords from Barbados, has a West Indies–style slave society roots. Classical Republicanism, democracy = privilege of the few, caste systems, fights against expanded federal powers, taxes and environmental, labor and consumer regulations.  A McCain stronghold.

      

EL NORTE. The oldest, borderlands of the Spanish American empire, Hispanic language and culture dominate. Norteños = independence, self-sufficiency, adaptabilility, and focus on work. Encompasses parts of Mexico.

      

THE LEFT COAST. “New England on the Pacific,” a hybrid of Yankee idealism and Appalachian self-expression and exploration—products range from the Summer of Love to the iPad. Ally of Yankeedom clashes with Far Western sections.  

      

THE FAR WEST. Shaped more by environment than ethnic factors.  High, dry and remote made habitable  by railroads and mining, dams, and irrigation systems directed by corporations headquartered in New York, Boston, Chicago, or San Francisco, or by the federal government.  Their senators fight against trusts and, of late, federal government, rather than corporate masters.

       

NEW FRANCE. Combo of northern French peasantry and natives of northwestern North America. Down-to-earth, egalitarian, and consensus driven, very tolerant attitudes toward gays and people of all races.  Readily accepts government involvement in the economy. Manifests in Canada, where multiculturalism and negotiated consensus are treasured.

    

FIRST NATION. Native American groups that retained their land and cultural practices and knowledge and survive in this challenging region on their own terms. Stands on the threshold of full independence. Liberalism traces to the first fur traders.   Huge—larger than the continental USA—but population under 300,000, most of live in Canada.

      

"Among the eleven regional cultures, there are two superpowers, nations with the identity, mission, and numbers to shape continental debate: Yankeedom and Deep South. For more than two hundred years, they’ve fought for control of the federal government and, in a sense, the nation’s soul."

    


Related posts & tools by Deb:

              

Detroit & Vegas – A Tale of Two Cities as Our Comeback Kids

    

Receive Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, sent once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

             

Agile Leader Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through Sharp Rocks

           

Goals: The Finish Line & Beyond

          

Leadership during Turbulent, Complex Times

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 13, 2013 11:17 AM

Understanding place is important to understand culture and motivation. Here are four books (of many) mentioned in reviews on this topic:
     

Cultural regions of the United States (1975)
by Raymond D Gastil

     

Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (America: A Cultural History) (1989) David Hackett Fischer

Analysis of the four “British folkways” in America

      
The Nine Nations of North America  (1981) by Joel Garreau

A study of what came to be simplified as the USA red-blue split

      

American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America  (2011) by Colin Woodard

Delves into history, building on David H. Fischer’s work.

     

~  Deb

 

Rescooped by Sharrock from Critical Thinking Skills and Japan
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking and Modern Japan: Conflict in the Discourse of Government and Business

Abstract:  This paper examines the public discourses of Japanese government and business interests on the subject of critical thinking within education. It begins by examining the dilemma critical thinking can pose to states and organisations with the emphasis it places on reasoned nonconformity. While nonconformity can be important in a post-industrial business context where fresh ideas and innovation provide the impetus for profit, it can also pose potential difficulties for organisational stability, as people choose to reject established ways of thinking or behaving. In twenty-first century Japan, this dilemma can clearly be seen in public policy statements made on education. On the one hand, the impact of globalised competition has led to a demand from government and business circles for a new kind of graduate, able to exercise independent judgement skills unbound by conventional thinking. On the other hand, they also express fears that the increasing individualism displayed by young people is threatening the social order and leading Japan towards an undesirable future. Their apparent solution to this dilemma is the re-introduction of patriotic and moral education, aimed at reaffirming the pre-war values of social duty and national solidarity.

 


Via Frank Carbullido
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Foundations of Meaning in Human Life

This essay has reviewed, clarified, and extended the list of universal human needs that Maslow first proposed. The next step would be to find first valid, then reliable ways of testing the hypothesis that each of these needs is indeed universal and invariant in different cultures and historical eras.

If such tests supported, even partially, the universality of these needs, the next step would be to investigate the extent to which societies allow their fulfillment If my definitions of solidarity, esteem, creativity, and emotional experience are valid, it would seem that most of these needs are not fulfilled for most people, even the most affluent.

It appears, for example, that connectedness and a sense of belonging are problematic in Western societies. That is, by my definitions, both collective and interpersonal solidarity are rare. The requirement of balance in identifying with, and awareness of self and other, us and them, suggests that most bonds are alienated in either the isolated or engulfed form. At the level both of families and large groups, what I have called bimodal alienation (engulfment within the group, isolation from other groups) seems to be the norm, rather than the exception. Since the degree and type of relationships may be crucial for not only for individuals but also for groups, these issues call out for considerably more discussion and research.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Americans truly are exceptional — at least when it comes to circumcision

Americans truly are exceptional — at least when it comes to circumcision | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"There's no question that among the world's wealthy nations, the U.S. stands out when it comes to circumcision. The WHO estimates that the overall male circumcision rate in the states is somewhere between 76 and 92 percent. Most Western European countries, by contrast, have rates less than 20 percent.  But even these numbers mask considerable regional variation within countries."

 

Tags: perspective, cultural norms, culture, gender, regions. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

These 8 Scales Reveal Everything You Should Know About Different Cultures

These 8 Scales Reveal Everything You Should Know About Different Cultures | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Many people, perhaps especially Americans, underestimate how differently people do things in other countries. Examples and insights for avoiding this can be found in "The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business," a 2014 bestseller by INSEAD professor Erin Meyer (also check out those global communication diagrams from Richard Lewis). Meyer claims you can improve relationships by considering where you and international partners fall on each of these scales:


Via Bonnie Hohhof
Sharrock's insight:

I'm always interested about comparative indicators and measures.