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The Problem With Facts

The Problem With Facts | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Good strategy is always becoming, never being. The mindless quest for absolute substantiation leads to false certainty, not greater rigor.
Sharrock's insight:

 

http://www.digitaltonto.com/2013/the-problem-with-facts/?utm_source=Digital%20Tonto%20Newsletter&utm_campaign=eb32bfb740-The_Problem_With_Facts2_3_2013&utm_medium=emailCargo Cults

Greg Satell reports: “During World War II, the fighting in the Pacific theater was fierce.  Small islands became improvised bases and large amounts of supplies were airdropped to feed the war machine. Food, medicine, weapons and even vehicles appeared from the sky, as if by magic.  Once the conflict ended, the flow of manufactured goods mysteriously disappeared.

“Alarmed by this sudden turn of events, some of the indigenous island peoples sought to replicate the conditions that led to the benevolence the visiting troops enjoyed.  They built makeshift airfields and offices, fashioned radios and headsets from wood and coconuts and even marched with makeshift rifles in imitation of soldiers’ drills.

 

In some remote areas, Pacific islanders still perform military rituals, hoping that valuable cargo will come from the sky.

“Alas, no cargo ever came.  Anthropologists have named these groups cargo cults and it’s fun to laugh at their naiveté.  They confuse correlation with causality.  Clearly, mimicking superficial behaviors achieves nothing and those who thinks it does are simply fooling themselves.

“However, similar rituals are alarmingly common in the corporate world.  They worship their own gods, (like Steve Jobs, or whoever else is the darling of the business press at any given moment), hoping that by emulating their superficial behavior, fortune will smile upon them as well. I’ve come to call these people cargo cult marketers.”

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Lisa Simpson Gets Why Correlation Does Not Imply Causation | Get Elastic Ecommerce Blog

Lisa Simpson Gets Why Correlation Does Not Imply Causation | Get Elastic Ecommerce Blog | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Lisa Simpson Gets Why Correlation Does Not Imply Causation - Conversion Optimization (Lisa Simpson Gets Why Correlation Does Not Imply Causation - Who says you can't learn critical thinking from TV?
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Are PISA scores really that important? | openDemocracy

Are PISA scores really that important? | openDemocracy | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Finding PISA sceptics proved easier than I expected.  A Huffington Post articleby Diane Ravitch, professor of education at New York University dismisses international test scores as worthless. While the US has never been first in the world, nor even near the top, on international tests, Ravitch claims it has done pretty well economically and in terms of scientific invention and business creativity - in fact better on many measures than any other nation. She bases these assertions partly on her own observations but more on a paper by Keith Baker, a retired researcher at the US Department of Education, entitled Are International Tests Worth Anything?

 
Sharrock's insight:

For a few days now, I've been wondering about the relationship of a nation's Nobel Prize winners to PISA scores. I finally decided to ask the question in Google. Here's one hit: "Clearly the countries with the worst PISA scores are those with the most impressive Nobel record. Equally significant, the correlation between PISA performance and GDP per capita is, as both Baker and Chang suggest, rather weak (less than 0.5)."

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