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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The Land Where the Blues Began

The Land Where the Blues Began | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In the late 1970s Alan Lomax traveled to Mississippi with filmmaker John Bishop and folklorist Worth Long and made this film about the African American music he found there.

 

The Land Where the Blues Began is one of five films made from footage that Alan Lomax shot between 1978 and 1985 for the PBS American Patchwork series (1991). A self-described "song-hunter," Alan Lomax traveled the Mississippi Delta in the 1930s and 40s, at first with his father John Lomax, later in the company sometimes of black folklorists like John W. Work III, armed with primitive recording equipment and a keen love of the Delta's music heritage. Crisscrossing the towns and hamlets, jook joints and dance halls, prisons and churches, Lomax recorded such greats as Leadbelly, Fred McDowell, and Muddy Waters, all of whom made their debut recordings with him.

 

In the late 1970s Lomax returned with filmmaker John Bishop and black folklorist Worth Long to make the film The Land Where the Blues Began. Shot on video tape, the film is narrated by Lomax and includes remarkable performances and stories by Johnny Brooks, Walter Brown, Bill Gordon, James Hall, William S. Hart, Beatrice and Clyde Maxwell, Jack Owens, Wilbert Puckett, J. T. Tucker, Reverend Caesar Smith, Bud Spires, Belton Sutherland, and Othar Turner The Association for Cultural Equity’s Alan Lomax Archive channel on YouTube additionally streams outtakes from this film: other strong performances by Walter Brown, Sam Chatmon, Clyde Maxwell, Jack Owens, Joe Savage, Bud Spires, Napoleon Strickland, and Othar Turner. Turner is also in Gravel Springs Fife and Drum on Folkstreams.

Alan Lomax's book by the same title won the 1993 National Book Critics Award for nonfiction.

No one has come close to Alan Lomax in illuminating the intersecting musical roots of an extraordinary range of cultures, including our own.
--- Nat Hentoff

Sharrock's insight:

Creativity and inspiration can come from exploring this regional and class specific creation of music.

 

 

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What You REALLY Pay for Content and What This Means for Marketing

What You REALLY Pay for Content and What This Means for Marketing | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
“The best things in life are free”--so goes the 1959 hit Motown single Money (That's What I Want) by Barrett Strong. Content, on the other hand, is never free. You pay something for content, knowin...

Via Ryan Hines
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Ryan Hines's curator insight, October 16, 2013 4:04 PM

Use the price of admission ladder (infographic) to understand what your audience pays to consume your content and how this affects your marketing.

Rescooped by Sharrock from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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Copywriting 101: The Principles of Irresistible Content

Copywriting 101: The Principles of Irresistible Content | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Learn how to take off your marketer hat and transform into a killer copywriter. You can do it. Really.

Via Alessandro Rea, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Alessandro Rea's curator insight, October 25, 2013 6:07 AM

“I can’t write.”

It’s the resignation declaration of the self-defeated. It’s also a fat slice of baloney.

You won’t write? You don’t want to write? I’m willing to buy these statements. But “can’t?” Sorry friend, you can.

You’ve been writing your whole life. You write now. You write emails, greeting cards, shopping lists, meeting notes, etc. In your school years, you wrote every day. When you graduated you wrote a resume.

But now, a blank screen transforms you into an anxious, insecure mess.

 

http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/copywriting-101-content-principles-ht ;