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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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Smart Teacher? Hard Teacher? Passionate Teacher? | Educate Texas

Smart Teacher? Hard Teacher? Passionate Teacher? | Educate Texas | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The discussion on teacher appraisal is heated because states and districts are linking student test scores to teacher performance and using the data to make decisions on pay, promotion, and retention of teachers. These high-stakes consequences can limit useful conversations on the pros and cons of these tools and how they could best be used in practice. There is real pressure, because of legislation in many states and new federal funding streams like Race to the Top, for states and districts to quickly develop and implement appraisal systems that measure teacher effectiveness. The notion that teachers should be held at least partly responsible for how their students achieve makes sense, but what is the best way to do this?

 
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "How can you assess something as complex as teaching if you have not defined what you should measure? There are three categories in which teacher quality is measured, including (1) teacher qualifications (2) teaching quality and (3) teacher effectiveness. Each category is measured in numerous ways that vary in complexity and validity." 

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Reading Sage: Webb's Depth of Knowledge (DOK) | Bloom's Taxonomy vs. Norman Webb's depth of knowledge

The Common Core Standards are the cornerstones of the Smarter Balanced and PARCC assessments, Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (scale of cognitive demand) and Blooms Revised Taxonomy (levels of intellectual ability) are the framework and the structures that will be used to evaluate students. Assessing curriculum, developing formative assessments, evaluation curriculum, and evaluation of students knowledge at the highest levels is being shared by two progressive cognitive matrices. Depth of knowledge, and complexity of knowledge is the heart of the more rigorous assessments being implemented in 2014. They share many ideas and concepts yet are different in level of cognitive demand, level of difficulty, complexity of verbs vs. depth of thinking required, and the scale of cognitive demand. Teachers need to learn how the frameworks are used to develop curriculum and how to use them to enhance instructions. Teachers and students can use Blooms Questions Stems and Webb’s DOK questions stems to create higher order thinking and improve achievement. 80% of the PARCC assessments will be based on the highest levels of blooms and the deepest levels of Webb’s DOK. Are you ready to use the DOK or Blooms daily in your class? 

 The links below are a great resources of Blooms Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge.Levels of Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of KnowledgeHess’ Cognitive Rigor Matrix & Curricular Examples | Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy | Webb’s Depth of Knowledge GuideDepth of Knowledge: Assessing Curriculum with Depth and MeaningBlooms and Webb ComparisonDepth of Knowledge ConsistencyDeveloping Higher Order Thinking Questions Based on Webb’s DOK andFCAT Content ComplexityPARCC Transition Information: AIMS Test and Common CoreDOK Question StemsDepth of Knowledge (DOK) LevelsINTRODUCTION TO WEBB’S DEPTH-OF-KNOWLEDGE LEVELSMathematics Depth-of-Knowledge LevelsDepth-of-Knowledge Levels for Four Content Areas
Sharrock's insight:

Links are useful as well as the exploration.

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NOVA | The Hippocratic Oath Today

NOVA | The Hippocratic Oath Today | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Read classical and modern versions of the oath and a short article about its controversial nature today.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Yet paradoxically, even as the modern oath's use has burgeoned, its content has tacked away from the classical oath's basic tenets. According to a 1993* survey of 150 U.S. and Canadian medical schools, for example, only 14 percent of modern oaths prohibit euthanasia, 11 percent hold convenant with a deity, 8 percent foreswear abortion, and a mere 3 percent forbid sexual contact with patients—all maxims held sacred in the classical version. The original calls for free tuition for medical students and for doctors never to "use the knife" (that is, conduct surgical procedures)—both obviously out of step with modern-day practice. Perhaps most telling, while the classical oath calls for "the opposite" of pleasure and fame for those who transgress the oath, fewer than half of oaths taken today insist the taker be held accountable for keeping the pledge."

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Cognitive Biases in Times of Uncertainty--Telling Ourselves A New Story

Cognitive Biases in Times of Uncertainty--Telling Ourselves A New Story | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
We live in a world of increasing pressure and uncertainty, driven in large part by digital technology infrastructures.

 

Author John Hagel goes on to explain a vicious business mindset we face today that constricts our opportunities and keeps us either stuck, or trending downward.

 

There are several pieces contributing to this limiting cycle and the narrative we tell ourselves, and each other, is a HUGE part of the problem. 

 

Hagel documents the threat-based narrative we are surrounded by and its consequences for our businesses (and political life):

ProtectionismPolarizationShort term focusMagnified risk while sacrificing potential rewardsUrgent reactionismUniformity versus innovationMinimal trust

 

This is not what we want for 2012. As writer Salman Rushdie says, "Those who do not have power over the story that dominates their lives truly are powerless, because they cannot think new thoughts."

 

In other words, if you want different results, change the story you are telling yourself.

 

Hagel brilliantly lays out the mindset problem and narrative we face today, and offers us an alternative.  The alternative starts with sharing a new narrative, and then supporting structures to make it real.

 

Read this article.  Shift the story. Add reinforcing structures to your business. You can do this in your own life and business -- you don't have to wait for some powers-t0-be to take action first. 

 

In this case, it is all about you!


Via Karen Dietz
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Meri Walker's comment, January 8, 2012 2:38 PM
Just back from 5 days with Byron Katie in Los Angeles and this is precisely what she teaches with The Work. What a great piece! Thanks for sharing it, Karen.
Karen Dietz's comment, January 8, 2012 5:02 PM
Glad you like it Meri! Byron Katie's work is fabulous. I've been talking a lot about this article a lot lately because I think it is so important for people to get. Have a great weekend!
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How do you like the Long Emergency so far...........?

How do you like the Long Emergency so far...........? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
James Howard Kunstler is one of my favourite writers.  No one has such a way with words, incisive, cynical, sarcastic, derisive, humorous, and also well written full of wit and clever imagery.........
Sharrock's insight:

This is not an optimistic TED talk. It does get one thinking and there is a need to research his conclusions and suggestions.

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Too Much Awareness Can Be a Bad Thing

Every now and then it's good to step back and reflect on ourselves and the state of our lives, but too much awareness can be a bad thing too.
Sharrock's insight:

The push back against the mindfulness trend.

 

As with everything else, moderation is the word when dealing with awareness.

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Envy: The Feeling Can Help Us Even When It Hurts: Scientific American

Envy: The Feeling Can Help Us Even When It Hurts: Scientific American | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Wanting what another person has can spur us to better ourselves

 

In BriefFeelings of inferiority and desire can spur us to bring down our competitors—or to better ourselves.Our ability to successfully control envy impulses is hampered by outside factors such as stress, exhaustion and inebriation.Transforming malicious envy into its more productive cousin, benign envy, may be a way to harness the emotion's power to motivate.
Sharrock's insight:

I couldn't read the whole article because I didn't buy the magazine. The "In Brief" and the article's beginnings reveal some interesting clues and topics to investigate, explore, and appreciate. One thing is the idea that envy isn't all "bad." There is malicious envy, but there is also "benign" envy, which is motivational. Even one of the "Deadly Sins" is more complex than the black-and-white evaluation we are used to encountering. This also fits well with the values of emotional intelligence in terms of social and emotional skills of self-regulation, impulse control, executive functioning skills, etc. 

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