Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
2.7K views | +1 today
Follow
Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Does Your Language Shape How You Think?

Does Your Language Shape How You Think? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The idea that your mother tongue shapes your experience of the world may be true after all.

IN WHAT OTHER WAYS might the language we speak influence our experience of the world? Recently, it has been demonstrated in a series of ingenious experiments that we even perceive colors through the lens of our mother tongue. There are radical variations in the way languages carve up the spectrum of visible light; for example, green and blue are distinct colors in English but are considered shades of the same color in many languages. And it turns out that the colors that our language routinely obliges us to treat as distinct can refine our purely visual sensitivity to certain color differences in reality, so that our brains are trained to exaggerate the distance between shades of color if these have different names in our language. As strange as it may sound, our experience of a Chagall painting actually depends to some extent on whether our language has a word for blue.

In coming years, researchers may also be able to shed light on the impact of language on more subtle areas of perception. For instance, some languages, like Matses in Peru, oblige their speakers, like the finickiest of lawyers, to specify exactly how they came to know about the facts they are reporting. You cannot simply say, as in English, “An animal passed here.” You have to specify, using a different verbal form, whether this was directly experienced (you saw the animal passing), inferred (you saw footprints), conjectured (animals generally pass there that time of day), hearsay or such. If a statement is reported with the incorrect “evidentiality,” it is considered a lie. So if, for instance, you ask a Matses man how many wives he has, unless he can actually see his wives at that very moment, he would have to answer in the past tense and would say something like “There were two last time I checked.” After all, given that the wives are not present, he cannot be absolutely certain that one of them hasn’t died or run off with another man since he last saw them, even if this was only five minutes ago. So he cannot report it as a certain fact in the present tense. Does the need to think constantly about epistemology in such a careful and sophisticated manner inform the speakers’ outlook on life or their sense of truth and causation? When our experimental tools are less blunt, such questions will be amenable to empirical study.

For many years, our mother tongue was claimed to be a “prison house” that constrained our capacity to reason. Once it turned out that there was no evidence for such claims, this was taken as proof that people of all cultures think in fundamentally the same way. But surely it is a mistake to overestimate the importance of abstract reasoning in our lives. After all, how many daily decisions do we make on the basis of deductive logic compared with those guided by gut feeling, intuition, emotions, impulse or practical skills? The habits of mind that our culture has instilled in us from infancy shape our orientation to the world and our emotional responses to the objects we encounter, and their consequences probably go far beyond what has been experimentally demonstrated so far; they may also have a marked impact on our beliefs, values and ideologies. We may not know as yet how to measure these consequences directly or how to assess their contribution to cultural or political misunderstandings. But as a first step toward understanding one another, we can do better than pretending we all think the same.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

10 signs of intellectual honesty

10 signs of intellectual honesty | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
by Judith Curry

When it comes to just about any topic, it seems as if the public discourse on the internet is dominated by rhetoric and propaganda. People are either selling products or ideology. 

Sharrock's insight:

Intellectual honesty is a tall order! Cognitive biases and fallacies number (together) towards a hundred. And the list is growing. You can't address each single bias or fallacy pragmatically and any shortened list can be arbitrary. Blog post also explores shifts in dialogue types.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

How to Improve Intelligence Communication

what is at the root of bad Intelligence Communication? 

Bad written and oral communication training in college (like everyone else!).The need to show off how smart we are … which may be particularly prevalent among intelligence and analytical functions, owing to the often difficult position of trying to influence direction from an external perspective.The need to prove we know what we’re talking about … which, again, is likely common to our positions since we are so often combating wisdom.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
Sharrock's insight:

for writing about internationally tense situations, a perspective that can be explored in fiction

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from educational implications
Scoop.it!

How Bill Gates Radically Transformed His Public Speaking And Communication Skills

How Bill Gates Radically Transformed His Public Speaking And Communication Skills | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

In an effort to draw attention to global problems,Bill Gates has mastered how to take complex issues and make them easy to understand.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

List of common misconceptions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of common misconceptions

This list pertains to current, widely held, erroneous ideas and beliefs about notable topics which have been reported by reliable sources. Each has been discussed in published literature, as has its topic area and the facts concerning it. Note that the statements which follow are corrections based on known facts; the misconceptions themselves are referred to rather than stated.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

AllAnalytics - Meta S. Brown - Why Data Analysts Need Business Analysts

AllAnalytics - Meta S. Brown - Why Data Analysts Need Business Analysts | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Business analysts are uniquely equipped to help data analysts and IT cooperate productively.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

3 Signs That Social Media Might Not Be the Right Fit for Your Small Business | SBA.gov

3 Signs That Social Media Might Not Be the Right Fit for Your Small Business | SBA.gov | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

It may be free, but if you are going to be successful at it, you need to commit the right resources. Getting online once or twice a day and posting an update isn’t enough. If you want social media to work for you as a lead generator, then you’ll need to throw some headcount at it – someone who can write blogs, search and listen to what is being said about your industry, your business and your products or services. Someone who can gauge and track what type of content people are responding to.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative

9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Learn how to be honest about sensitive subjects without sounding too negative.

 

Here are 9 key tips on how to be honest with someone:

Look at the situation from their perspective before you do anything.

 

Ask yourself if this is something that really needs to be said. Are you telling them anything they don’t know or haven’t acknowledged?

 

Choose your words carefully – say it to yourself before you say it out-loud. How does it sound?

 

Don’t insult, blame, exaggerate, or be judgmental. Use a calm and respectful tone while describing the problem.

 

Do it in private. You don’t want the person to feel like they are being pressured by a bunch of people all at once.

 

Always offer a solution. Don’t just state a problem if you don’t have some good advice to go with it.

 

Admit you could be wrong. This is just your opinion, the person doesn’t have to agree with you.

 

Let it go if you notice the person is responding negatively toward it. Don’t persist if they aren’t interested in talking about it.

 

Go back to being a good friend again. Don’t make it awkward.
Sharrock's insight:

This might help students as well as teachers and administrators. Social skills need to be taught, sometimes explicitly. Might be useful for a number of different classrooms and social settings, including the speech therapist's space or office when trying to teach pragmatic language skills to students with ADHD/ADD, on the autism spectrum, or students with lagging skills in the language or social skills.

 

I love it when adults say something devastating and rationalize the disasterous response with "I was just being honest." And by love I mean I really really have no patience with such statements. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Solitary linguistic confinement

Solitary linguistic confinement | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
ANY fan of cops-crooks-and-courtrooms dramas knows that solitary confinement is a treat reserved for highly volatile criminals, or used to punish inmates for various...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How do you tell someone they’re dying?

How do you tell someone they’re dying? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How do you tell someone they’re dying?

 

If the person in front of you doesn’t have long to live, what are the right words to tell them? Chrissie Giles asks doctors how they tackle the hardest conversation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The new semiotics of death

The new semiotics of death | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The traditional social and cultural rituals and behaviours associated with death and the process of dying are under review to the extent that a new set of signs, symbols and cultural codes are emerging. In short, a new semiotics of death is emerging, one that will change the way we conduct our rituals, the way we behave and ultimately how we think about death in the 21st century.


Codes that symbolise death

 

Existing codesMasculinePowerlessnessTop-down authorityRitualised uniformityFormal and sombreMourningHidden/closedTemporal remotenessDecayDestructionOne-waySoul immortalityDownLinearity and finalityEmerging codesFeminineChoiceBottom-up responsivenessDiversity and personalisationInformal and funCelebrationRevealed/openNowGrowthConstructionTwo-way and interactiveVirtual immortalityUpCircularity and incompleteness


Sharrock's insight:

 Meaning is like an engine  that creates and is generated by culture. I am amazed that we can catch these changes. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What We Mean When We Say Hello

What We Mean When We Say Hello | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Reinvention and resilience across the nation Read more Last week I wrote about conversation starters that follow “Hello” and “How do you do.” Many dozens of you have written in and generously included your comments and interpretations of what...
more...
No comment yet.