Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The Impact Character: Why Every Character Arc Needs One - Helping Writers Become Authors

The Impact Character: Why Every Character Arc Needs One - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
“Impact character” is the term coined by Dramatica authors Melanie Anne Phillips and Chris Huntley to describe what is just as accurately termed by editor Roz Morris the “catalyst character.” This is the character who slams into your protagonist, catalyzes him into change, and has a major impact on his life.
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8 Elements to NAILING Your Plot & Owning NaNo

8 Elements to NAILING Your Plot & Owning NaNo | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
I promised not to leave you guys hanging with my last post. Now that I have a lot of you beating your shields ready for NaNo, I'm going to give you battle tactics to come out victorious (or maybe a...

Via Ruth Long
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How to Use Rewards and Punishments to Get Your Character to Change - Helping Writers Become Authors

How to Use Rewards and Punishments to Get Your Character to Change - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How do you get your character to change? As simple as this question may seem, it's also an important question that deserves a practical answer.
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The Principles of Character Motivation | WritersDigest.com

The Principles of Character Motivation | WritersDigest.com | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Explore the principles of human nature, including resentment and revenge, and how it can lead to character development and motivation.
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Psychologists Discover How People Subconsciously Become Their Favorite Fictional Characters

Psychologists Discover How People Subconsciously Become Their Favorite Fictional Characters | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Psychologists have discovered that while reading a book or story, people are prone to subconsciously adopt their behavior, thoughts, beliefs and internal responses to that of fictional characters as if they were their own.
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Sharrock's curator insight, May 12, 2014 11:02 AM

How can educators tap into this phenomena?

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How to structure a premise for stronger stories - The Writer

How to structure a premise for stronger stories - The Writer | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
"A big-city copy moves to a small coastal town..." Developing a carefully structured premise can arm you with a strong story and a solid pitch line. It’s something agents can sink their “jaws” into.

Via Ruth Long
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How to Figure Out WHAT Your Character's Arc Should Be - Helping Writers Become Authors

How to Figure Out WHAT Your Character's Arc Should Be - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Picking the character's arc that's perfect for your story requires nothing more than the answers to three questions.
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How to Find Your Character's Breaking Point - Helping Writers Become Authors

How to Find Your Character's Breaking Point - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The most important moment in your story is your character's breaking point. Discover how to time the breaking point so it accomplishes everything it must.
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Maybe Your Bad Guy Is RIGHT! - Helping Writers Become Authors

Maybe Your Bad Guy Is RIGHT! - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Shares the single most effective trick EVER for creating a realistic, compelling, and powerful bad guy.
Sharrock's insight:

I read some of the same exploration in John Gardner's On Moral Fiction. Actions of a major character, no matter how seemingly extreme or destructive, needs to be explained in terms of character, motivations, incidents and responses to those incidents. This is one of the most powerful indicators towards post-modernism, the idea that there are no black and white bad guys. The Game of Thrones books does this to a great degree (so much so that "goodness" does not insure one's survival nor that "sadism"--evil--insure a violent, ironic death). History, and the stories told about motivations and actions, support those motivations and actions, just as well as BIG-C creativity can only be supported in retrospect. Sometimes, the expression "let history be my judge" can be a bit melodramatic, but something similar might need to be said.

 

 Andrea Kuszewski explored this issue using science findings http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/03/31/walking-the-line-between-good-and-evil-the-common-thread-of-heroes-and-villains/  to support another way writers might develop evil characters.

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Ambivalent Men and the Women Who Love Them

Ambivalent Men and the Women Who Love Them | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The non-committal, emotionally unavailable man pairing with an overly attentive female who is willing to hang in there--no matter what--is a surprisingly common relationship. Always eager to sew wild oats, the male in this dynamic is frequently described as a "player.”

Why in this scenario does the female stay true to such a man? It may be because she believes his very aloofness makes him a more desirable catch. If she hangs in there long enough, he will eventually commit, and it will mean so much more because he was so ambivalent about her in the beginning. She sees a chance for self-validation in earning his attention when others couldn't.

Women caught in this circular thinking rarely experience a happy romantic ending. 

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Planning Character Arcs

If you like to plan your stories ahead, you’ve almost certainly sketched out your plot. But have you planned your character arcs? Every story needs a character arc for its protagonist, even if it’s simple or subtly conveyed. And while supporting characters don’t always need an arc, stories are better off when they’re included.

 

Luckily, characters arcs work very much like any other plot strand you might be working on. The difference is that they focus on inner events rather than external ones, which can make them harder to wrap your head around. If you have a character that needs an arc and you’re not sure how to add one, these steps will get you started.


Via Ruth Long
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KindredReaders's curator insight, March 10, 2014 11:29 AM

Most of us think of supporting characters in terms of the role they need to play. This article suggests you step back and think of the constellation of characters as a whole, then as individuals. A worthwhile read!

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The Protagonist: How to Center Your Story

The Protagonist: How to Center Your Story | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In a traditional story, the protagonist has several very specific requirements, and if your protagonist doesn't meet those requirements, your story will break down.

Via M. W. Catlin, Sharon Bakar
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, May 17, 2013 12:00 AM

Useful advice on how to create a strong protagonist for your story.