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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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The Brain Geek: BRAIN MYTH-BUSTING: You only use 10% of your brain

The Brain Geek: BRAIN MYTH-BUSTING: You only use 10% of your brain | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

            "You only use 10% of your brain." Heard that before? I have. Loads of times. It’s such a popular idea, it’s even in the movies. A typical plot might be: "Here, Joe Nobody. Take this pill! It will allow you to use the full 100% of your brain! Wow! Now you're psychic and can move things with your mind! Amazing!" ...or.... "That girl is a genius because she had radioactive accident which changed her DNA and now she can use more than 10% of her brain. And she's psychic and can move things with her mind!" According to pop culture, the fast track to superpowers is using the full 100% capacity of your brain. Now, I'm the first person to say that sci-fi/fantasy is awesome, but this is just nonsense! Why? Because we already use 100% of our brains. Last time I checked, I couldn’t move things with my mind. If I could, my breakfast would be cooking itself right now.

Sharrock's insight:

neuroscientist author says, "The myth started because so little of our brain is actually neuron. The rest is glia. But does that mean we only use 10% of our brain? No! We use those glia. They keep the brain healthy and moving quickly. We use 100% of our brains, all the time. And if we increased the percentage of neurons, so that it was more than 10% (which would make glia less than 90%), would that make us smarter? No! Because you needs lots of glia to have a smart brain. So next time someone says to you, "You're interested in the brain, right? Is it true we only use 10%?", feel free to show off just how much of your brain you're using, and tell them all about glia."

   
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The Truth About The Left Brain / Right Brain Relationship

The Truth About The Left Brain / Right Brain Relationship | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Are you right-brained or left-brained? Or is the question itself a little harebrained?
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The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought

The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The brain appears to be wired in a rectangular 3D grid structure, suggests a new brain imaging study. (...) “Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain’s connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables — folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric,” (...)

 

“The wiring of the mature brain appears to mirror three primal pathways established in embryonic development.” (...) “Before, we had just driving directions. Now, we have a map showing how all the highways and byways are interconnected,” said Wedeen. “Brain wiring is not like the wiring in your basement, where it just needs to connect the right endpoints. Rather, the grid is the language of the brain and wiring and re-wiring work by modifying it.”

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"By looking at how the pathways fit in the brain, we anticipated the connectivity to resemble that of a bowl of spaghetti, a very narrow and discreet object," (...) "We discovered that the pathways in the top of the brain are all organized like woven sheets with the fibers running in two directions in the sheets and in a third direction perpendicular to the sheets. These sheets all stack together so that the entire connectivity of the brain follows three precisely defined directions." (...)
"This is the first time it has ever been determined that the geometry of the brain is described by a three-dimensional grid," (...)

 

"The research took MRI scanners and new mathematical algorithms to determine a geometry to the relationship of nearby pathways in the brain so that each pathway was part of a two-dimensional sheet of pathways that together looked exactly like a woven sheet of fabric," Each pathway was part of a parallel series next to it crossed by a perpendicular series at a right angle, together which formed a woven grid.

 

The structure was part of a three-dimensional scaffold connections of the brain conformed to the extremely simple three-dimensional structure, a single woven grid with fibers in only three axes. By using diffusion MRI and mapping the three-dimension motion of the water molecules in the brain, the scientists ran the maps through mathematical algorithms that inferred from the water motion pattern the fiber architecture of the tissue of the brain." -- http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=123711&org=NSF&from=news


Via Amira
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Here Are 97 Books, Articles, And Movies That Will Make You Smarter

Here Are 97 Books, Articles, And Movies That Will Make You Smarter | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Here's a great list of titles that will test your brain and challenge the way see you the world.
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A Model of Functional Brain Connectivity and Background Noise as a Biomarker for Cognitive Phenotypes: Application to Autism

A Model of Functional Brain Connectivity and Background Noise as a Biomarker for Cognitive Phenotypes: Application to Autism | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

We present an efficient approach to discriminate between typical and atypical brains from macroscopic neural dynamics recorded as magnetoencephalograms (MEG). Our approach is based on the fact that spontaneous brain activity can be accurately described with stochastic dynamics, as a multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process (mOUP). By fitting the data to a mOUP we obtain: 1) the functional connectivity matrix, corresponding to the drift operator, and 2) the traces of background stochastic activity (noise) driving the brain. We applied this method to investigate functional connectivity and background noise in juvenile patients (n = 9) with Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and compared them to age-matched juvenile control subjects (n = 10). Our analysis reveals significant alterations in both functional brain connectivity and background noise in ASD patients. The dominant connectivity change in ASD relative to control shows enhanced functional excitation from occipital to frontal areas along a parasagittal axis. Background noise in ASD patients is spatially correlated over wide areas, as opposed to control, where areas driven by correlated noise form smaller patches. An analysis of the spatial complexity reveals that it is significantly lower in ASD subjects. Although the detailed physiological mechanisms underlying these alterations cannot be determined from macroscopic brain recordings, we speculate that enhanced occipital-frontal excitation may result from changes in white matter density in ASD, as suggested in previous studies. We also venture that long-range spatial correlations in the background noise may result from less specificity (or more promiscuity) of thalamo-cortical projections. All the calculations involved in our analysis are highly efficient and outperform other algorithms to discriminate typical and atypical brains with a comparable level of accuracy. Altogether our results demonstrate a promising potential of our approach as an efficient biomarker for altered brain dynamics associated with a cognitive phenotype. (...) - by Dominguer LG et al., PLoS ONE 8(4): e61493


Via Julien Hering, PhD
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A New Information-Theoretical Model Of Human Sensory Perception And Memory Sheds Light On Some Peculiarities Of The Nervous System.

A New Information-Theoretical Model Of Human Sensory Perception And Memory Sheds Light On Some Peculiarities Of The Nervous System. | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Ask adults from the industrialized world what number is halfway between 1 and 9, and most will say 5.
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