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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Where do Savant Skills Come From?

Where do Savant Skills Come From? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Unraveling the mysteries surrounding the exceptional performance of savants.
Sharrock's insight:

This is an informative article. I have been guilty of suggesting that people with autism might often demonstrate savantism. However, the article clarifies that savantism is not a correlated subset to autism: "one in ten people with autism have savantism, although only half of the documented savants are autistic. The rest have some other kind of developmental disorder. - See more at: http://www.creativitypost.com/psychology/where_do_savant_skills_come_from#sthash.6AnqduZw.dpuf. Students with Asperger's syndrome are not synonymous with students with savantism. 

 

Another important point about savantism is that it is not simply a superintelligent skill. "The trade-off between memory and meaning is common among savants. The purpose of memory is to simplify experience. We didn’t evolve memory to be precise. Instead, we extract meaning wherever we can so that we can organize the regularities of experience and prepare for similar situations in the future. But without the imposition of meaning, savants can focus on literal recall. Some savants even have hyperlexia, which is the opposite of dyslexia. They are precocious readers, but have no comprehension of what they are reading."

 

- See more at: http://www.creativitypost.com/psychology/where_do_savant_skills_come_from#sthash.6AnqduZw.dpuf

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 18, 2:01 PM

My first experience with a student who was autistic taught me a great deal about learning and creativity. I was the student many days. We are all different and that is important to acknowledge.

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33rd Square: Turning Autism Symptoms Into Strengths

33rd Square: Turning Autism Symptoms Into Strengths | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Alternative treatment focuses on controlling the ‘fight or flight’ response may help young people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder could help them navigate their world by teaching them to turn their symptoms into strengths.
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A Model of Functional Brain Connectivity and Background Noise as a Biomarker for Cognitive Phenotypes: Application to Autism

A Model of Functional Brain Connectivity and Background Noise as a Biomarker for Cognitive Phenotypes: Application to Autism | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

We present an efficient approach to discriminate between typical and atypical brains from macroscopic neural dynamics recorded as magnetoencephalograms (MEG). Our approach is based on the fact that spontaneous brain activity can be accurately described with stochastic dynamics, as a multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process (mOUP). By fitting the data to a mOUP we obtain: 1) the functional connectivity matrix, corresponding to the drift operator, and 2) the traces of background stochastic activity (noise) driving the brain. We applied this method to investigate functional connectivity and background noise in juvenile patients (n = 9) with Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and compared them to age-matched juvenile control subjects (n = 10). Our analysis reveals significant alterations in both functional brain connectivity and background noise in ASD patients. The dominant connectivity change in ASD relative to control shows enhanced functional excitation from occipital to frontal areas along a parasagittal axis. Background noise in ASD patients is spatially correlated over wide areas, as opposed to control, where areas driven by correlated noise form smaller patches. An analysis of the spatial complexity reveals that it is significantly lower in ASD subjects. Although the detailed physiological mechanisms underlying these alterations cannot be determined from macroscopic brain recordings, we speculate that enhanced occipital-frontal excitation may result from changes in white matter density in ASD, as suggested in previous studies. We also venture that long-range spatial correlations in the background noise may result from less specificity (or more promiscuity) of thalamo-cortical projections. All the calculations involved in our analysis are highly efficient and outperform other algorithms to discriminate typical and atypical brains with a comparable level of accuracy. Altogether our results demonstrate a promising potential of our approach as an efficient biomarker for altered brain dynamics associated with a cognitive phenotype. (...) - by Dominguer LG et al., PLoS ONE 8(4): e61493


Via Julien Hering, PhD
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TY! @drseide for Child Prodigies: A Unique Form of Autism? - Psych Central News

TY! @drseide for  Child Prodigies: A Unique Form of Autism? - Psych Central News | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A study of eight child prodigies suggests a significant link between their special abilities and autism.

 

“The link between child prodigies and autism is strong in our study,” said Joanne Ruthsatz, Ph.D., lead author of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Ohio State University.

“Our findings suggest child prodigies have traits in common with autistic children, but something is preventing them from displaying the deficits we associate with the disorder.”

Of the eight prodigies who took part in the study, three had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. As a whole, the prodigies also tended to have slightly higher scores on a test of autistic traits, when compared to a control group.

Furthermore, half of the prodigies had a family member or a first- or second-degree relative with autism.

Ruthsatz said it is surprising that half of the families and three of the prodigies themselves were affected by autism since autism occurs in only one of 120 individuals.

Researchers also found that while child prodigies had higher general intelligence scores, where they really excelled was in working memory—they all scored above the 99th percentile on this trait.


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Boyle is part of 'invisible generation'

Boyle is part of 'invisible generation' | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Scottish singer Susan Boyle is one of thousands of people who have autism or Asperger's but were not diagnosed earlier in life.
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The Most Inspiring Use For Google Glass We've Seen So Far

The Most Inspiring Use For Google Glass We've Seen So Far | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Penicillin, X-rays, Viagra: Some of man's greatest discoveries were made by accident.

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Γιώργος Παπαναστασίου's curator insight, August 14, 2013 9:50 AM

"...a tool that could help autistic users identify facial cues in real time."

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Themselves Surprising Link Between Depression, ADHD, Bipolar, Schizophrenia and Autism

Themselves Surprising Link Between Depression, ADHD, Bipolar, Schizophrenia and Autism | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A study finds that five mental disorders that appear to be very different actually share some of the same gene mutations.
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