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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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Weird Shit

Weird Shit | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Forming somewhere between old English to the modern uncanny, weirdness is its own language. Erik Davis offers a brief etymological look at weird, the word, and the place where it lurks in our imagination.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "The roots of weirdness lie in the noun wyrd, an Old English term that pops up in Beowulf and denotes the (usually grim) demands of destiny. The adjective first appears in the phrase weird sisters, which was used by Scottish poets to describe the classical Fates before Shakespeare attached the term to the witches ofMacbeth. But Shakespeare’s spelling of weird is, well, a bit weird—“weyrd”, “weyward”, and “weyard” appear in the first folio, but never “weird”. These alternate spellings, again, suggest the term wayward, a word used by Shakespeare to denote the capricious refusal to follow rule or reason. This suggests to someMacbeth scholars that, in addition to their oracular knowledge, the witches are also defined by their willful resistance to the norm, a perverse and chaotic twist away from the law. Early on, then, weirdness already covers two contrasting but related forces: necessity and anomaly."

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Ghoulish gourds from Luxembourg's creative carver

Ghoulish gourds from Luxembourg's creative carver | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
For pumpkin carver extraordinaire Chris Schrieken, Halloween is his favourite and busiest time of the year.
Sharrock's insight:

creative pumpkin carving

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The Art of Curation: Great Content Curator Maria Popova from Brain Pickings [Interview]

The Art of Curation: Great Content Curator Maria Popova from Brain Pickings [Interview] | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

As more and more people and brands take to producing digital content, a group of individuals has arisen with the goal of filtering the wheat from the chaff. I had the pleasure of interviewing the curator of the popular site Brain Pickings, Maria Popova, and picking her brain on this topic. The role of people like Maria will only become more important in the future, and her insights are well-worth consideration.

 

Some excerpt:

- Content curators are the cultural barometers that help harness our inherent curiosity in the most meaningful way possible.

 

- The art of curation isn’t about the individual pieces of content, but about how these pieces fit together, what story they tell by being placed next to each other, and what statement the context they create makes about culture and the world at large. Every piece of content on Brain Pickings is hand-picked for embodying the sort of cultural interestingness at the core of our curatorial vision – it’s creative, compelling and makes a meaningful contribution to the world; it offers a justification to be curious and enriches you in the process of indulging that curiosity.

 

There are other many excellent points...

Highly recommended.

[read full article http://j.mp/o4hpaS]


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
Sharrock's insight:

Many of her curated knowledge, her interpretations and insights, have changed how I see things, especially art, creativity, imagination, and knowledge in general. I could say the same about The Paris Review, but not as emphatically!

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Paris Review - The Art of Humor No. 2, Garrison Keillor

Paris Review - The Art of Humor No. 2, Garrison Keillor | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Paris Review is a literary magazine featuring original writing, art, and in-depth interviews with famous writers.
Sharrock's insight:
interview excerpt: " I write for a radio show that, no matter what, will go on the air Saturday at five o’clock central time. You learn to write toward that deadline, to let the adrenaline pick you up on Friday morning and carry you through, to cook up a monologue about Lake Wobegon and get to the theater on time. That can be pleasurable, but only if the material you write is good. If it’s not, you’re filled with self-loathing. If the material is good and funny, you still loathe yourself, of course, for writing comedy and lighthearted fluff instead of writing serious and loathsome fiction, but . . . What was your question?"
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How Mr. Rogers Got Autotuned

How Mr. Rogers Got Autotuned | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
John D. Boswell aka Melodysheep explains how he made the trippy yet comforting autotune from Americas most beloved neighbor.
Sharrock's insight:

I watched the video "autotuned mash up" after reading the author's reflection on knowledge synthesis. Boswell's work was creative. It occured to me that the "mash up" is a new creative artform. This was a creative and instructional video. I have also seen mash ups of old cartoons that were humorous. These mash ups seemed to have voice overs though, not using the original dialogue that accompanied the clips mashed together. Boswell's mashup used voice and video of the clips. 

 

from the page: "Boswell watched eight episodes of Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood.As he watches, Boswell identifies clips he likes and writes down their timecode, before organizing them digitally. Through this process, the video’s theme and message start to emerge. Next Boswell establishes the chorus, which must have a direct correlation to the message of the video. Boswell says that for this video, the themes he identified: creativity and imagination, were woven in easily since Rogers deals with them so much on his show. With the chorus and theme in place, he begins to eliminate clips that won’t work within the context of the video, winnowing down his selection the way a sculptor crafts his art from a block of stone."

 

I was interested and watched Boswell's Carl Sagan mashup.

 

I also wonder if anyone else does this "mash up" work. Has anyone watched any other instructional or entertaining mashups? Please provide links to them. Is there valuable criticism of the completed works? Are mash ups getting collected anywhere? If so, where?

 

so far, there are two types or genres of mashups: autotune and comedic (what I am calling the "marvel mash ups"). Are there other mash up genres?

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