Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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Rescooped by Sharrock from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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DIY Lake Science - Simulations and Activities for Learning About Lakes - iPad Apps for School

DIY Lake Science - Simulations and Activities for Learning About Lakes - iPad Apps for School | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
DIY Lake Science is a relatively new iPad app from the Lawrence Hall of Science. The free iPad app is designed to help students learn about lake ecosystems. In the app students will find a small simulation of a lake ecosystem. Students can change the depth of the lake, the temperature, and the general climate around the lake to learn how those changes alter the ecosystem. After using the simulation students can learn more about lake ecosystems in the DIY Lake Science video library.

Via John Evans
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Rescooped by Sharrock from Teaching + Learning + Policy
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The 10,000-Hours Myth: What It Really Takes To Be An Expert

The 10,000-Hours Myth: What It Really Takes To Be An Expert | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The '10,000-hour rule' — that this level of practice holds the secret to great success in any field — has become sacrosanct gospel, echoed on websites and recited as litany in high-performance workshops. The problem: it’s only half true. If you are a duffer at golf, say, and make the same mistakes every time you try a certain swing or putt, 10,000 hours of practicing that error will not improve your game. You’ll still be a duffer, albeit an older one. No less an expert than Anders Ericsson, the Florida State University psychologist whose research on expertise spawned the 10,000-hour rule of thumb, 'You don’t get benefits from mechanical repetition, but by adjusting your execution over and over to get closer to your goal. You have to tweak the system by pushing,' he adds, 'allowing for more errors at first as you increase your limits.'” | by Maria Popova

 


Via Todd Reimer
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