Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
Curated by Sharrock
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Things to Know About Chapter Length by Crime Author Joel Goldman

Things to Know About Chapter Length by Crime Author Joel Goldman | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Many fiction writers (especially early on in their careers) seem to agonize over chapter lengths. How long should each chapter run?

Via Ruth Long , Lynnette Van Dyke
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From Tweet to Blog Post to Peer-Reviewed Article: How to be a Scholar Now

From Tweet to Blog Post to Peer-Reviewed Article: How to be a Scholar Now | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Digital media is changing how scholars interact, collaborate, write and publish. Here, Jessie Daniels describes how to be a scholar now, when peer-reviewed articles can begin as Tweets and blog pos...

Via antonella esposito, Jeroen Clemens
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How to structure a premise for stronger stories - The Writer

How to structure a premise for stronger stories - The Writer | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
"A big-city copy moves to a small coastal town..." Developing a carefully structured premise can arm you with a strong story and a solid pitch line. It’s something agents can sink their “jaws” into.

Via Ruth Long
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Young People Wait Out the Recession…and Their Youth - Working In These Times

Young People Wait Out the Recession…and Their Youth - Working In These Times | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Useful as English Language Arts and social studies class resource. What did the las "Lost Generation" accomplish?
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The Largest Vocabulary in Hip hop

The Largest Vocabulary in Hip hop | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Hip hop + data + linguistics http://t.co/53SDyOhcr8


Via Ayoub Maatallaoui
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so much to connect in subjects like math and English (ELA).

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Graphical visualization of text similarities in essays in a book | munterbund.de

Graphical visualization of text similarities in essays in a book | munterbund.de | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

Introduced me to the term "metadata". Lately, I've been reading about transparency and accessibility. It's not enough to simply have the information. We need to be able to understand it and understand enough to make decisions about it. Then we have to apply that information. Similar concepts: informed consent, citizen engagement.  But just like in lab reports for studies/research, essays about data contains biases to recognize and conclusions to interpret and evaluate for validity. Metadata examines these issues.

 

"Metadata

Examples of essay metadata are the essay’s author, the time period in which an essay was written, the essay language, the number or type of images it uses, the text genre, the intended audience, the essay length (in characters, words, sentences, sections, pages), file format, typeface, etc. We find that it is possible to automate the collection of some of these metadata. For example, the language in which an article is written can be determined by comparing the words used in the article with words of other known languages. If the article contains words associated with the region where Romanian is spoken, it was most likely written in Romanian [ad.01]. If words are unknown to the computer, it will not be able to determine the language.

 Early stages in the process to the final result

For the most part, the time period during which an essay was written can be retrieved automatically - provided that the text was written on a computer and the word-processing program kept track of the writing sessions. If images are available in digital form, it is also possible to automate the processing of image metadata, since in in such cases, image file formats, dimensions, color depths and resolutions are known. However, image content is meta-information that needs to be classified manually. Consequently, classification of metadata as manual or automatic must be performed on a case-by-case basis. Although the length of a text is meta-information, it can be determined automatically in such great detail that it transitions to the domain of automatically collectable metadata.

 
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Five Ways to Change Someone Else's Mind

Five Ways to Change Someone Else's Mind | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There are times when you want other people to act or think a certain way - namely, the way you think and act. There's an art to persuasion that begins with a few simple rules. The first comes from
Sharrock's insight:

I often make this mistake and this exerpt, describing this kind of mistake, is powerful: "Make the other person feel right. Don't make them feel wrong. This point might win the prize for what gets ignored most often. Anytime you bully somebody, lord it over them, use your position of authority, or act superior, you are making that person feel wrong. We all feel wrong when we are judged against. We feel right when we are accepted, understood, appreciated, and approved of. (I've met at least one hugely successful executive who built his entire career on making other people feel that they were the most important person in the room.) If you make someone else feel accepted, you have established a genuine bond, at which point they will lower their defenses. If you push someone away instead by making them feel wrong, their defenses will turn twice as strong."


We like to say that there is no place in society for persuasion, but we believe in persuasion. I believe there are times that persuasion is appopriate, justified, or necessary. However, there are those that support the idea that the most effective learning is from the information-seeking dialogue where authority, coercion, manipulation are not employed, and information is shared openly and transparently. 

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Retelling History through Poetry - Primary Source Set | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

Retelling History through Poetry - Primary Source Set | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Create poems using words and phrases selected from primary source texts to retell the historical content. Includes text and images on topics as diverse as Helen Keller, Walt Whitman, women’s suffrage, and the Harlem Renaissance.

Via Mary Reilley Clark
Sharrock's insight:

This is a cool idea. I remember coming across something similar in a textbook.

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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, August 15, 2013 2:02 PM

Great lesson using primary sources to create found poetry.  The Library of Congress units now include a dropdown menu to find the CCSS each lesson aligns with.