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Herramientas para una educación interactiva

Herramientas para una educación interactiva | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
Estamos acostumbrados en contemplar los avances de la tecnología en tres aspectos principales: como mejora la televisión que estoy utilizando, que nuevas cualidades tiene mi auto y en qué forma ha …

Via Alfredo Calderón, juandoming
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Idea to retire: Technology alone can improve student learning

Idea to retire: Technology alone can improve student learning | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
What does make a difference is how students use technology. When students use technology in passive ways to consume media, even educational media, the positive impact is limited. But when students use technology actively, as a tool to create, to design, to explore, and to collaborate, they enable new kinds of deep, often transformational, learning experiences.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 25, 12:26 AM

I hope this message starts to sink in.

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Visualizing the Global Network of Languages

Visualizing the Global Network of Languages | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
Interactive visualization uses translation data to explore connections among world languages
Via Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Key Tensions in the Field of Learning Analytics

Key Tensions in the Field of Learning Analytics | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it

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The right conditions for creativity via "The Learner's Way"

The right conditions for creativity via "The Learner's Way" | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
According to Ken Robinson schools kill creativity. Since his 2006 TED talk
in which he asks ‘Do schools kill creativity?’ many teachers and thinkers
have pondered this question and vowed to bring creativity back to their
classrooms. Amongst the 21st Century skills that we aim to develop with our
students, creativity ranks high and is listed as one of the ‘Four C’s that
also include collaboration, critical thinking and communication.
Understanding and identifying the barriers to creativity and the conditions
which are essential for it to thrive is an important step in the process of
ensuring our students leave school with a capacity for creativity at least
equal to that which they arrive with.

Perhaps the most essential condition for creativity is permission. Our
students need to be given permission to be creative, to experiment and play
with ideas. Explicit permission to be creative includes acknowledgement
that this process will at times involve silliness, immaturity, mess and
mistakes. Not all of the ideas our students pursue will be world changers.
Many of their ideas will be dead ends and many will be heading in the wrong
direction. When we give our students permission to play with their ideas,
to share their most playful ideas we encourage them to retain the youthful
creativity that allows them to imagine countless new solutions and options.

A condition for creativity closely linked to permission is acceptance of
failure. Einstein puts it well ‘Anyone who has never made a mistake has
never tried anything new’. The danger is that creativity inherently
involves making mistakes and yet so much of the school system is about
avoiding mistakes. Assessment and testing is an important part of education
but they are a messaging system that acts against creativity. Risk taking
is discouraged by assessments where students are more likely to receive
positive results by taking a safe route. Generally speaking, in assessments
there is a known correct answer even if that correct answer is only known
by the teacher. The student’s goal is to present a response that closely
matches that correct answer and thus risk taking and creativity are
discouraged. Shifting how we think about assessments and their role within
learning may allow us to identify where this part of the process is
stifling creativity. Reimagining our assessments may allow us to encourage
and reward creativity and allow students to achieve the level of success
they deserve even when their responses do not match a preconceived image of
what a correct response is.

A third condition for creativity is time and it is this that is perhaps
most difficult for schools to provide. The creative process is one that is
ill served by fixed durations and schedules. It is an iterative process in
which ideas sometimes come together quickly and sometimes multiple attempts
are required. Unfortunately, most schools are such busy places that time to
do something over when it doesn’t work the first time is hard to find.
Creativity is a process that can rarely be kept to a distinct timeframe or
schedule. Inspiration does not always arrive in the first five to fifteen
minutes after commencing a project. Ideas need time to germinate, time to
take a walk and let things bubble away, time to sleep on it and see what
comes the next day. The time that the creative process requires is
difficult to show on a detailed teaching programme and as a result we tend
to stick to the times we allocate and move students on to the next task
even if the creative potential of the first has not been fully explored.

Creativity requires choice. A creative process must involve students making
choices about what they will do and how they will do it. Too often in
schools the creative process is stolen from the students by the teacher who
uses their planning time to imagine how their children will be creative.
The tasks that the students engage with produce pretty results but all
scope for creativity has been planned out of the task before the students
get near it. Creativity can not result in a class set of near identical
artworks, or stories, or songs or mathematical solutions. For teachers
giving students choice can be frightening. Some students may not engage
with the desired outcomes. Some students may require resources that were
not planned for. Some students may not finish at all and some will produce
results that are not as visually pleasing as the teacher had imagined. The
question is, are we preparing our students for a future in which creativity
is required and valued or for one in which they will be process workers
accurately following directions? Undoubtedly choice will be messy, hard to
plan for, difficult to assess, complex to schedule and yet the results will
reveal more about the students and their learning than tasks planned for
them.

Creativity deserves a structure that promotes it and scaffolds its
development. Divergent thinking is a wonderful thing but at some point
students need to be able to move from many ideas to the one they will bring
to fruition. Convergent thinking is an essential part of creativity and it
is in this process that students and teachers often struggle. Students have
difficulty evaluating their ideas and fine tuning them to one that has the
best chance of fulfilling their needs. Teachers are too quick to intervene
and make the decision for their students. Utilising a structure such as a
‘Design Thinking’ provides a way of moving forward and experience with the
application of such models allows students to identify times where
divergent thinking is required and those that require convergence. This
process needs to be one that occurs individually and as part of a
collaborative process such that students learn to share their ideas with a
group and accept when the group makes choices that do not include their
ideas.

Creativity needs an audience. Too often students develop their ideas for an
audience of one; their teacher. The creative endeavours of our students
deserve a larger audience, an audience that will celebrate and critique the
results while providing multiple perspectives. Providing a real audience
for student creativity lifts the stakes and encourages students to see
their efforts as a contribution to something bigger than a class
assignment. The risk taking that comes with sharing creative ideas widely
can at first be intimidating but students who experience this regularly and
from an early age are more likely to embrace this experience and benefit
from the rich feedback it provides. Real audiences in today’s connected
world can be global and opportunities for dialogue and engagement with a
global audience brings new opportunities. Real audiences can and should
include experts from the field that students are learning in and these
connections may extend learning far beyond the expertise available to
students through the classroom.

Creativity is best served by a culture that values it. Ultimately the sum
total of our beliefs, attitudes and behaviours will define our cultural
valuing of creativity. Encouraging creativity begins with what we say and
what we do to support it but the ultimate success of our endeavours will be
measured by the degree to which creativity becomes a part of the culture of
a school.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Velyn Chia Yu Shin's curator insight, March 15, 4:53 AM

I agree what the author had said in the article. i, too, agree that creativity in students are pretty much restricted.

 

Most of us are walking the safe and secure path rather than exploring and finding paths that have not been discovered.

We have been brought up in this way such as we do not have the courage to take risk instead we do what is safe which would not have mistakes and guaranteed to succees.

 

What is the reason that cause us to be like that? I think that just like what the author had said in the article where "The danger is that creativity inherently involves making mistakes" "yet so much of the school system is about avoiding mistakes."

 

I foresee things to be different in the future as i have now, myself, also experience that more space has been given to student to think creativey such as inquiry for life project (ILP) where we need to come up with product from scratch with only a given guideline (a product which is beneficial for mankind or the environment) or  designing poster to promote people to be more energy saving.

 

Such implements will force students to think creatively even when they don't want to but i also think that if such impletments were to go overboard, it might fire back and students will start to hate this kind of assignment that has been given to encourage creative thinking.

 

I truely think that at the end of the day we ,the students, benefits from this. The reason why i think that we benefit from this is because it is we who are going out into the world and work when we grow up. I believe that it is creative thinking that can help us to be better and stand out from others because i think that each and every one of us have different views on certain things, different ideas and it is creativity that makes us think out of the box, think differnetly from others. It makes us unique.

 

I think that it is not truly full proof as we are humans and results would surely differ from person to person but i personally think that creative thinking is an important skills which i require in my future.

 

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Reality Editor

Reality Editor | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
A new kind of tool for empowering you to connect and manipulate the functionality of physical objects.

Via Suvi Salo
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How Technology Will Transform Retirement

How Technology Will Transform Retirement | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
Get ready for a new array of devices and services that will make it easier to work, stay healthy, live at home and remain connected to friends and family.

Via Paul West
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How two 20-year-olds made $30,000 in one night playing StarCraft

Games have gotten so big that even the State Department recognizes video games as a sport and offers athletic visas.

Via Peter Mellow
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Unlocking the potential of the Internet of Things | McKinsey & Company

Unlocking the potential of the Internet of Things | McKinsey & Company | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
If policy makers and businesses get it right, linking the physical and digital worlds could generate up to $11.1 trillion a year in economic value by 2025. A McKinsey Global Institute article.
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The Future of the Web Looks a Lot Like Bitcoin

The Future of the Web Looks a Lot Like Bitcoin | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
Forget the currency; it’s the protocol behind it that matters. It will mutate and take over everything we do (or could one day do) on the Web. You’ve been warned
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Gamify Moodle: Part 1 - Laying the Base

Gamify Moodle: Part 1 - Laying the Base | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
In this 3-part tutorial series, we show you how to gamify courses on your Moodle installation. We will use Playlyfe for the gamification features.

Via Gisele Brugger
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Just how effective are language learning apps?

Just how effective are language learning apps? | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
Language experts review how one of the world's most popular language learning apps measures up against traditional teaching.
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Online Grammar Tools

Online Grammar Tools | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it

I hope you enjoy these sites and find them useful. If you want more grammar related sites just click the link to see more Grammar links


Via Nik Peachey, Vladimir Kukharenko
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DocAten's curator insight, July 25, 10:13 AM
Allez, on révise son anglais et en particulier la grammaire !
Educity Pedagogy's curator insight, July 27, 12:24 AM
I hope one another website to provide study material for banking sector, see it  http://www.oureducity.com/
Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, July 27, 11:29 AM
These sites can be useful for ESL/EFL students.  Videos of grammar explanations and exercises in Grammar Flip can be helpful for independent practice.
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elearnspace › Adaptive Learners, Not Adaptive Learning

elearnspace › Adaptive Learners, Not Adaptive Learning | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
Basically, we have to shift education from focusing mainly on the acquisition of knowledge (the central underpinning of most adaptive learning software today) to the development of learner states of being (affect, emotion, self-regulation, goal setting, and so on). Adaptive learners are central to the future of work and society, whereas adaptive learning is more an attempt to make more efficient a system of learning that is no longer needed.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 25, 12:34 AM

Very good short article on adaptive learning.

Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, July 27, 9:28 AM
An interesting article about developing the mindset of the learner to be adaptive. I have to think about this some more, but what do you think?
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Journal of Learning for Development - JL4D

Open journal - JL4D provides a forum for practitioners and academics working in education and development to share knowledge and experience 


Via Paul West
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University workforces need to evolve fast to meet big challenges

University workforces need to evolve fast to meet big challenges | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
Universities need to change quickly to be successful in attracting students in an increasingly competitive environment.

Via Mark Smithers
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How Productive Failure Leads to Better Learning 

How Productive Failure Leads to Better Learning  | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
Building something from nothing and sharing it with the world, in whatever your medium may be, requires a lot of bravery. I’ve chronicled both my own idea prison and some of my attempts to free myself before. But lately I’ve noticed the “prison of your own ideas” sneaking up on me in a new way: That apprehension about whether or not our work is any good can stop us from learning new skills that can challenge us and help us grow as people.

Via Nik Peachey, Yasemin Allsop, Chris Carter
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Stewart-Marshall's curator insight, February 23, 12:21 AM

Getting out of your comfort zone is essential for growth. Some good insights in this article.

Tony Guzman's curator insight, February 25, 10:21 AM

This Albert Einstein quote truly shares the main point of this article: “Everyone sits in the prison of his own ideas; he must burst it open.”

Chris Lawrence's curator insight, February 29, 1:49 PM

For all my fellow perfectionist out there.

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automation is coming to a job near you

automation is coming to a job near you | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it

Just as farmhands were replaced by machines 100 years ago, so too will knowledge workers be replaced by networked computers in the next few decades. Last century, those farmhands had the option of moving to the city and working in factories, but what are the alternatives for today’s knowledge workers? It is not likely to be a new job, as the job itself is being made obsolete, underlined by 54 million freelancers in the USA today, accounting for almost 1/4 of working-age adults.


Via Marta Torán
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Marta Torán's curator insight, December 21, 2015 3:43 PM

Muy interesante el artículo de Harold Jarche.

La automatización llega a todos los trabajos. Tu trabajo,en gran medida, será automatizable. Puedes consultar el informe de McKinsey Global Institute.

 

En este contexto solo las personas capaces de enfrentarse a problemas complejos desde la empatía, con creatividad y colaborando con muchos, nunca podrán ser sustituidos por máquinas. 


Genial

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U Georgia Nears $2 million Mark in OER Savings -- Campus Technology

U Georgia Nears $2 million Mark in OER Savings -- Campus Technology | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
U Georgia Nears $2 million Mark in OER Savings

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How to help us build #OB101

How to help us build #OB101 | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
We're using hypothes.is to get the community's input!

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England will not take part in OECD's 'Pisa for universities'

England will not take part in OECD's 'Pisa for universities' | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
Doubts now raised over future of project billed as having potential to shake up hierarchy of world higher education
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The Myth Of The Bell Curve: Look For The Hyper-Performers

The Myth Of The Bell Curve: Look For The Hyper-Performers | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it
There is a long standing belief in business that people performance follows the Bell Curve (also called the Normal Distribution). This belief has been embedded in many business practices: performance appraisals, compensation models, and even how we get graded in school. (Remember "grading by the curve?") Research shows that this statistical model, while easy to [...]

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Developing Strategies for Implementing Analytics

Developing Strategies for Implementing Analytics | Learning@the_speed_of_change | Scoop.it

In answering five questions, the following IT Issues panelists provided their thoughts on how analytics can improve higher education and how best to implement analytics:


Via Peter Mellow, davidgibson
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