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learning to learn English with technology
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English Communication for Scientists

English Communication for Scientists | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it
English Communication for Scientists is a brief guide on how to communicate more effectively in English, no matter how much previous experience you have.

Via Steve Kirk
Shona Whyte's insight:

This looks great for university ESP courses, aimed at learners themselves rather than teachers.

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Steve Kirk's curator insight, November 19, 2013 8:54 AM

A six-unit online course in science-oriented writing.  There are some interesting tips here for speakers of different languages...but no differentiation by academic discipline. Some generalisations do, of course, hold, however, and so there is some useful material here - if taken critically. See what you think.

 

Illustrations here and there by the Times Higher Education cartoonist, Jorge Cham.

 

Thanks to @annehodg for bringing this to my attention.

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Writing for a Purpose | LearnEnglish | British Council

Writing for a Purpose | LearnEnglish | British Council | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it

From the introduction to this learning resource on writing for EAP students:

 

"If you are studying in a British university you will be required to do a large amount of writing, whatever your subject. Some people distinguish between "essays" and "reports", and you may also know some other names for written assignments. However, sometimes the same name is used for very different types of assignment, and different names are used for very similar types of assignment.

 

Some of these assignments are more common in some disciplines than in others. For example, in business Case Studies are very common, in law Problem Questions are very common, while in history and philosophy Essays are very common.

 

Three thousand examples of proficient British university assignments from more than 30 disciplines, such as business, engineering, law, biology, sociology and history have been collected. These form the BAWE corpus. By analysing these assignments 13 basic Genre Families of student writing can be identified and each one has been given a specific name.

The 13 Genre Families are:

Explanations

Exercises

Literature Surveys

Methodology

Recounts

Research Reports

Essays

Critiques

Event Recounts

Public Engagement

Case Studies

Design Specifications

Problem Questions

Proposals

 


Via Steve Kirk
Shona Whyte's insight:

Nicely designed e-learning resource with integrated activities.

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Steve Kirk's curator insight, July 8, 2013 3:54 AM

This is a great collection of learning resources, designed by Andy Gillet (@UEfAP | http://www.uefap.com/) for the British Council. The resources draw on the BAWE corpus work done by Hilary Nesi and Sheila Gardner, published as Genres across the Disciplines: Student Writing in Higher Education (CUP). Students (and teachers) can learn about the 13 genre families identified and their relevance to UK university study. The website materials are ESRC funded - and free for all to use.

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Lang-8 - multilingual language learning site

Lang-8 - multilingual language learning site | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it

"Write in the language you are learning.  Native speakers correct your writing for you.  Help others learn your native language."

Shona Whyte's insight:

Worth a try for independent university learners.

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Advanced Composition for Non-Native Speakers of English

Advanced Composition for Non-Native Speakers of English | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it

"This site provides instructions for writing essays in English for a US academic audience. This site also contains academic essays by ESL and EFL students writing in English for university level classes."

 

Shona Whyte:

Erlyn Baack, ESL writing instructor, ITESM, Quertaro Campus (Mexico) maintains the site http://eslbee.com on advanced composition for non-native speakers of English: advice, examples and exercises for academic writing for intermediate learners and beyond.

 

Here's a review by Jennifer Banton (University of Quebec, Montreal)

"Advanced Composition is a clean looking unified site. It is well planned and easy to follow. There is no advertising to clutter the pages, and all images are directly related to the sites' content and purpose. The audience is specified, and the stated goals are achieved. The author takes great care to cite secondary information, and he includes useful links to related sites. All of this sets a very much appreciated formal and academic tone. In comparison to other Online Writing Labs, Advanced Composition stands out as one of the few which offers higher order writing instruction, including university level sample writing."

 

Via Vanessa Vaile of Blogging English.

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Poetry and the Art of Teaching Practice

Poetry and the Art of Teaching Practice | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it

"Have you forgotten the way to my hut?
Each evening, I wait for the sound of your footsteps
But they are never there."

EFL teacher and trainer Anthony Gaughan describes a rewarding writing lesson based on the above haiku poem.

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Paper Rater: Free Online Grammar Checker, Proofreader, and More

Paper Rater: Free Online Grammar Checker, Proofreader, and More | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it

This looks worth checking out for intermediate/advanced learners of English: copy and paste your text into this online grammar checker, and receive free and instant feedback on grammar and spelling errors and word choice statistics.


Via Yuly Asencion
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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critica...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Nice justification of literature, liberal arts, pitched beautifully for anglophone teens, but just about right for undergrad second language speakers, IMO.

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Eion_D's curator insight, March 30, 6:44 AM

Hopefully more engaging than the last post, John Green has created a series of Crash Course videos based around Literature. This is the first, it links in to our discussions about thinking critically, and why it's so important to be able to delve deeper. Finding meaning, creating an analysis of a text shouldn’t be a nightmare; it should give you the opportunity to view the world differently. So with that in mind, and having watched the video, I want you to sit down and have a think about the text Romeo & Juliet, before answering these two questions:

            Using the comments section, create for me, a list of the things you have learnt from the play. It's pretty simple, just a list of information, literary concepts, feelings or understandings you have gained from reading the play. Why? Because reflecting on what we've learnt from a text will help us move forward in understanding ourselves and how we can communicate those changes with others. By doing it together, with everyone's input, we can create a storyboard of our learned experiences as a group.

            Pick a character from the play (this exercise may help, if you're struggling to build the above list). Choose the character you thought you would most hate. Tell me why you thought they would be loathsome. And then as clearly and concisely as you can, explain why you were surprised that you didn't hate them at all. What experiences changed your mind? Were they persuasive speakers? Did their actions redeem themselves in your eyes? What emotion, or lived experience caused you to empathise with them, despite how much you wanted to hate them?

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Academic Phrasebank

Shona Whyte's insight:

The University of Manchester put together this 39 page document of phrases used in academic writing organised by function and with comments for users. An almost dauntingly comprehensive list, but I can see applications for teaching and learning EAP, probably with advanced learners.

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, January 19, 2013 2:50 AM

See also the UEFAP site. http://www.uefap.com/

Luciana Viter's comment, January 19, 2013 10:01 AM
Thanks, Shona, a very helpful EAP resource.
Shona Whyte's comment, January 20, 2013 3:34 AM
There seems to be a lot of interest in this sort of resource. I'm curious about how people see it being used for language teaching and learning.
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English Resources: primaryresources.co.uk

English Resources: primaryresources.co.uk | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it

"Primary Resources - free worksheets, lesson plans and teaching ideas for primary and elementary teachers."

 

Teaching materials intended for young native speakers, which can be used for reading and writing work with young EFL learners.  Includes text, PDF, powerpoint and interactive whiteboard (Notebook) files.

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Eisa Muhammad's curator insight, September 24, 6:45 AM

Good links and greatly helpful

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Solvemall.com - crosswords online

Solvemall.com - crosswords online | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it

Nik Peachey: Great collection of online crossword puzzles to help improve your English. Lots of different levels from beginner with pictures to more advanced.

 

Shona Whyte: Nice new site, probably hard for all but upper intermediate and advanced learners, but worth a try if you're looking for new ways to work on vocabulary and spelling.


Via Nik Peachey
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Toasted Cheese > A Pen In Each Hand : Writing Exercises

Toasted Cheese > A Pen In Each Hand : Writing Exercises | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it
This site has any number of writing prompts, designed for English native speakers, but eminently suited to learners at intermediate levels or beyond. This page has exercises on a theme ("write what you dig") and you can read a related article for the rationale. There is also a calendar with short daily prompts, challenges to get you started and keep you going, and a forum for feedback.
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Google Docs

Google Docs | Learning technologies for EFL | Scoop.it

Don't have Microsoft Office (Word, Excel)?  You can create and edit text documents and spreadsheets online with Google Docs.  They are saved online, and you can keep them private or share them with others.  All you need is an internet connection.

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