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China’s Ambitious Goal for Boom in College Graduates

China’s Ambitious Goal for Boom in College Graduates | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
China is making a huge investment in its universities, hoping to leverage its enormous population into 195 million college graduates by the end of the decade.

 

"China is making a $250 billion-a-year investment in what economists call human capital. Just as the United States helped build a white-collar middle class in the late 1940s and early 1950s by using the G.I. Bill to help educate millions of World War II veterans, the Chinese government is using large subsidies to educate tens of millions of young people as they move from farms to cities.

 

The aim is to change the current system, in which a tiny, highly educated elite oversees vast armies of semi-trained factory workers and rural laborers. China wants to move up the development curve by fostering a much more broadly educated public, one that more closely resembles the multifaceted labor forces of the United States and Europe."

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Tough Choices: How the poor spend money

Tough Choices: How the poor spend money | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Three families living around the poverty line in San Diego tell Marketplace Money what it means to spend money when you don't have a whole lot of it."

"'It’s stress,' Halima Tinson says as she paces back and forth in front of a San Diego preschool.

'But I want my husband to go to school. Because I know when he finishes, I won’t have to worry anymore.'

Tinson is trying to get her three-year-old twins signed up for the Head Start program to free up time for her husband. If her twins get into the program, Rickey Ricardo won’t have to stay home to watch the kids during the day. They’re too poor to afford good childcare. Any job that Ricardo could get wouldn’t pay enough to cover the costs of daycare. But free preschool means free time. Perhaps time enough to get some training and a well-paying job."
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Hispanic Student Population Swells at Texas Schools

Hispanic Student Population Swells at Texas Schools | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"By 2050, nearly two-thirds of Texas public school students will be Hispanic and probably poor. But in the Laredo Independent School District, for one, that is already the case."

"But geography aside, Texas public schools may increasingly find more in common with the South Texas district. In 2011, the state reached two landmarks. For the first time, Hispanics became the majority of public school students. And to cope with a historic budget deficit, the Legislature did not finance enrollment growth in the state’s schools — something that had not happened since the modernization of the Texas public school system in 1949. Though the first turning point passed quietly and the second with much political strife, they both underscore the challenges ahead as a dramatic demographic shift occurs in public school classrooms statewide.

By 2050, the number of Texas public school students is expected to swell to nine million from roughly five million now, and nearly two-thirds will be Hispanic, according to Steve Murdock, a demographer and director of Rice University’s Hobby Center for the Study of Texas. The overall percentage of white students will drop by half to about 15 percent. Without an accompanying change in Hispanics’ current socioeconomic status, that also means Texas students will continue to grow poorer — and their education more expensive — in the next four decades, Dr. Murdock added. (Rice University is a corporate sponsor of The Texas Tribune.)

State population figures over the last decade show the shift is well under way in the public school system. Economically disadvantaged children in Texas classrooms make up 60 percent of all public school students, up from less than half in 2000. Students with limited English skills now make up 16 percent of them. Of about 979,000 children added to the state’s under-18 population from 2000 to 2010, 931,000 were Hispanic.

'When you look at children, there is no doubt. The future of Texas — the future of the United States — is tied to the minority population,' said Dr. Murdock, a former state demographer and director of the United States Census Bureau. 'It’s just mathematically true.'l
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Criminalizing Photography

Criminalizing Photography | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
In a conversation with James Estrin, Mickey H. Osterreicher, a lawyer for the National Press Photographers Association, discusses a troubling trend of arrests for photography in public spaces.
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U.S. nuns seek ‘open dialogue’ with Rome over disputes

U.S. nuns seek ‘open dialogue’ with Rome over disputes | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Accused of straying far from orthodoxy and of needing to be 'reformed,” the Leadership Conference of Women Religious chooses its course with Rome.'"

"'Both sides in the standoff speak of ‘dialogue,’ but they seem to mean different things,” said R. Scott Appleby, a historian at Notre Dame. Leading bishops 'understand dialogue as a conversation about how best to implement the pope’s vision of religious life and witness. The sisters mean an open-ended give-and-take that is more of a mutual discernment of where the Spirit is leading the Church at a given moment in history.'

"But leading bishops said nuns have no right to question official teachings of the pope.

'How in the world can these consecrated religious who have professed to follow Christ more closely . . . be opposed to what the Vicar of Christ is asking? This is a contradiction,' Cardinal Raymond Burke, leader of the Vatican’s Supreme Court, told Catholic TV station EWTN. 'If it can’t be reformed, then it doesn’t have a right to continue.'"
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Of the 1%, by the 1%, for the 1%: May 2011

Of the 1%, by the 1%, for the 1%: May 2011 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Americans have been watching protests against oppressive regimes that concentrate massive wealth in the hands of an elite few. Yet in our own democracy, 1 percent of the people take nearly a quarter of the nation’s income—an inequality even the wealthy will come to regret."

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Protesters for Nuns Ask U.S. Bishops to Help Them Out

Protesters for Nuns Ask U.S. Bishops to Help Them Out | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

As the U.S.Catholic bishops gather for their annual spring meeting, protesters want them to intervene on behalf of the nation's nuns, who have been sharply criticized by the Vatican for "serious doctrinal problems."

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On Memorial Day Weekend, America Reckons With Torture | Bill Moyers

On Memorial Day Weekend, America Reckons With Torture | Bill Moyers | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Why it's important to face the truth about U.S. torture tactics as we honor Americans in uniform."

"This summer, it’s believed that the United States Senate’s intelligence committee finally will release a report on 'enhanced interrogation techniques,' that euphemistic phrase for what any reasonable person not employed by the government would call torture. The report has been three years in the making, with investigators examining millions of classified documents. The news service Reuters says the report will conclude that techniques such as waterboarding and sleep deprivation do not yield worthwhile intelligence information.

So here we are, into our eleventh year after 9/11, still at war in Afghanistan, still at war with terrorists, still at war with our collective conscience as we grapple with how to protect our country from attack without violating the basic values of civilization — the rule of law, striving to achieve our aims without corrupting them, and restraint in the use of power over others, especially when exercised in secret.

In future days and years, how will we come to cope with the reality of what we have done in the name of security?  Many other societies do seem to try harder than we do to come to terms with horrendous behavior commissioned or condoned by a government. Beginning in 1996, in South Africa, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission held hearings at which whites and blacks struggled to confront the cruelty inflicted on human beings during apartheid.

And perhaps you caught something said the other day by the president of Brazil, Dilma Roussef.  During the early 70′s, she was held in prison and tortured repeatedly by the military dictators who ruled her country for nearly 25 years. The state of Rio de Janeiro has announced it will officially apologize to her. Earlier, when she swore in members of a commission investigating the dictatorship, President Roussef said: 'We are not moved by revenge, hate or a desire to rewrite history. The need to know the full truth is what moves us.'

In other words, 'You shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free.'"
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Information Liberation: Your Guide to the International Web

Information Liberation: Your Guide to the International Web | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
The world wide web is supposed to be just that: world wide.

Sometimes it simply isn’t, however:

This Guide, by author Jim Rion,  is a must-have for anyone looking for access to the complete Internet. 

 

This complete guide to the International web will show you: http://bit.ly/Joo3QB ;


**Which governments around the world restrict Internet access
**Whether its ethical to bypass such restrictions, and which tools to use
**Encrypting your web browsing and email for secure communications
**How to find Internet access while traveling by knowing where to look
**Buying a computer while abroad: an ex-pat’s guide
**Setting up your computer to display non-alphabetic languages
**Getting the most out of translation tools
**Accessing media blocked in your country using VPN and more

 

Download Guide [PDF] Here: http://bit.ly/Joo3QB ;


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The Internet is the Best Place for Dissent to Start

The Internet is the Best Place for Dissent to Start | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Finally, Zuckerman argues that the lesson from the Arab spring is that revolutions are touched off by everyday people with everyday grievances – arbitrary detention, corruption and police brutality – and those people will use the tools they are familiar with to get the word out.

 

The first thing that comes to mind after you capture a mobile phone video of the police murdering a family member isn't

 

"Let's see, I wonder if there's a purpose-built activist tool that I can use for distributing this clip?"

 

Rather, the first thing that comes to mind is, "I'd better post this on Facebook/YouTube/Twitter so that everyone can see it.""

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Young Women Leaving Work in Droves to Go Back to School

Young Women Leaving Work in Droves to Go Back to School | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Many young women are leaving the labor force to upgrade their skills, while their male counterparts are more likely to take whatever job they can find."

 

"Now, as was the case then, one sex is the primary beneficiary. Though young women in their late teens and early 20’s view today’s economic lull as an opportunity to upgrade their skills, their male counterparts are more likely to take whatever job they can find. The longer-term consequences, economists say, are that the next generation of women may have a significant advantage over their male counterparts, whose career options are already becoming constrained.

 

For now at least, many young women still feel that the deck is stacked against them.

 

'Almost everyone in my program is female,' said Ms. Baker, who hopes a master’s degree will help her get a job running communications at a nonprofit group. 'That’s partly because of the program, but also because as women we feel like we have to be more educated to be able to compete in really any field.'

 

Women still earn significantly less than men. And in the two and a half years since the recovery officially began, men age 16 to 24 have gained 178,000 jobs, while their female counterparts have lost 255,000 positions, according to the Labor Department."

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Daily Show: Exclusive - Lawrence Lessig Extended Interview Pt. 2

Lawrence Lessig proposes that America implement a voucher system to fund Congressional campaigns.

 

Lawrence Lessig explains why political transparency, while necessary, is not enough to fix America's government, in this unedited, extended interview.

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Inconvenient Income Inequality

Inconvenient Income Inequality | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Some recent surveys seem to suggest that many Americans are in denial about the seriousness of the gap between the rich and poor.

 

"Is income inequality becoming the new global warming? In other words, is this another case where the facts of an existential threat lose traction among a weary American public as deniers attempt to reduce them to partisan opinions?

 

It’s beginning to seem so.

 

A Gallup poll released on Thursday found that, after rising rather steadily for the past two decades, the percentage of Americans who said that the country is divided into “haves” and “have-nots” took the largest drop since the question was asked.

 

This happened even as the percentage of Americans who grouped themselves under either label stayed relatively constant. Nearly 6 in 10 Americans still see themselves as the haves, while only about a third see themselves as the have-nots. The numbers have been in that range for a decade.

 

This is the new American delusion. The facts point to a very different reality."

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Blasphemy And The Governor Of Punjab

Blasphemy And The Governor Of Punjab | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"A documentary-drama set in Pakistan about the assassination of the Governor of Punjab over his stance on the blasphemy laws.

 

On 4 January 2011, self-made millionaire businessman and Governor of Punjab Salmaan Taseer, was gunned down in a parking lot of a popular Islamabad market. He had been leading a campaign to amend Pakistan's blasphemy laws, after an illiterate 45-year-old Christian woman Asia Bibi, from a village in his district had been sentenced to death for blasphemy.

 

Within hours of his death, a Facebook fan page for the assassin Mumtaz Qadri had over 2000 members, before site administrators shut it down. When Qadri was transferred to jail, he was garlanded with roses by a crowd of lawyers offering to take on his case for free. President Asif Ali Zardari, an old friend of Taseer's, didn't go to the funeral for fear of inflaming public opinion. Leaders of state-funded mosques refused to say funeral prayers for the slain governor.

 

Owen Bennett-Jones speaks to Taseer's family and friends, and the family of the assassin." The programme includes both interview material and dramatic reconstructions. 

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Childhood Poverty: Shame of the Nation

Childhood Poverty: Shame of the Nation | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"I [Jason Flom] just attended a brief webinar with the Carsey Institute on their recent brief that identifies patterns in childhood poverty using data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey.

 

The brief is sobering to say the least. In short, despite the recession being “over,” poverty rates among children continue to rise, most dramatically in urban areas, among the unemployed (those actively looking for work), and in families of color.

 

That this information is not front and center in our current presidential campaign is shocking, horrifying, and saddening. When nearly 1/4 of our children are living below the poverty line, we have a moral obligation to act, even if they are, by definition a part of the 47%. The closest we come to talking about it, and I mean REALLY talking about it, is to insist teachers improve all students’ “achievement.”"

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Affording the Classroom of the Future

Affording the Classroom of the Future | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

By Bridget McCrea

 

"New technology equipment and tools, state of the art building materials and methods, and experimental teaching practices are all impacting today's K-12 classroom. Districts nationwide are struggling to patch together learning environments that they think represent the future of learning at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels. As they adopt campus-wide IT infrastructures, invest in classroom technology, and test out alternatives to traditional learning spaces, the final results of all this innovation remains to be seen.

 

"To help decipher that code and give principals, administrators, IT directors, and teachers an insider look into what might be coming a few years down the road, THE Journal asked a half a dozen educational experts for their take on three different key concerns: what the classrooms will look like, who will pay for them, and whether we'll ever see them during our lifetimes."

 

This article at least scratches the surface of a discussion about the future of educational facilities and hardware. I'm thinking that a lot of the information here tends to conceive of future settings using today's ideas...and doesn't account for the fact that the landscape will be very different even just 3 or 4 years from now. It would take that much time, at a minimum, to implement these changes, but by then, they will already be out of date. The answer is most elusive. -JL


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The people with no lobby in Washington

"In national politics, the influence of money is a perennial concern, and the 2012 election cycle has involved a particular frenzy of campaign spending. But to focus exclusively on election spending is to overlook the staggering sums—more than $3 billion every year since 2008—that are devoted to old-fashioned lobbying.

To an outsider, the variety of organizations that seek influence in Washington can be startling. There is the Window Covering Manufacturers Association, the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers, and the Handcrafted Soapmakers Guild. There is a lobby for duck hunters and one for motorcyclists. The astonishing diversity of organizations that lobby might give the impression that they represent the full spectrum of American life, from pro-business groups like the Chamber of Commerce to unions like the AFL-CIO, and from right to left—with plenty of groups, like the National Safety Council, that have no obvious ideological coloration.

But to conclude from this diversity that all Americans have at least some kind of organization looking out for them would be wrong. In decades of researching American political lobbies, we have found that there are huge gaps in who is represented. And, as an old Washington saying goes, 'If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu.'"
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Paul Ryan’s Social Extremism

A long history of social extremism makes Paul Ryan an emblem of the Republican tack to the far right.
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Stiglitz Speaks Video: The Price of Inequality, June 14, 2012

"Nobel Prize winning economis, author and lecturer, Joseph Stiglitz, talks about his latest book, THE PRICE OF INEQUALITY: HOW TODAY'S DIVIDED SOCIETY ENDANGERS OUR FUTURE. Joseph Stiglitz spoke at the Cedar Hills Crossing Powell's Bookstore in Beaverton, Oregon, on June 14th, 2012. To find out more about the author, please visit his website at josephstiglitz.com. This program was produced by pdxjustice Media Productions of Portland, Oregon."

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Catholic Bishops Vow to Press On Against Obama Policies

Catholic Bishops Vow to Press On Against Obama Policies | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Ten years after a scandal forced the nation’s Catholic bishops to adopt policies for combating sexual abuse, the prelates heard a generally positive assessment of their progress."

 

"Bishops are meeting as the Catholic Church in the United States has been roiled by the Vatican’s censure of the nation’s largest organization of American nuns, the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, and a theologian, Sister Margaret A. Farley, who wrote a book about human sexuality.

 

Members of a coalition called Nun Justice protested Wednesday outside the hotel where the bishops are meeting. They delivered petitions asking the bishops to end the crackdown on the nuns’ group. The petition had 57,818 signatures, about one for every American nun.

 

A nun on the staff of the bishops’ conference was dispatched to accept the petitions. The nun, Sister Mary Ann Walsh, director of media relations, said the dispute would have to be resolved between the Vatican and the nuns. She said, 'We hope that they can handle it in a P.C. way, and that means ‘prayerfully collaborative.’ '"

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New Classroom Science Standards Up for Review

"The first substantial update to national science teaching standards in roughly 15 years — and the first including the science of human-driven climate change — is open for public comment through this month. 

 

The effort has been directed by Achieve, an organization created by states and corporate backers eager to boost student performance and prospects as science and technology increasingly drive economies. The final (optional) standards will help guide states in shaping science curricula and requirements.

 

The foundation for the standards was laid in a National Academy of Sciences report. Other groups involved in the effort are the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Science Teachers Association and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which has provided much of the money."

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Why Afghan Women Risk Death to Write Poetry

Why Afghan Women Risk Death to Write Poetry | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"A new literary network revives an old Pashtun tradition."

"In a private house in a quiet university neighborhood of Kabul, Ogai Amail waited for the phone to ring. Through a plate-glass window, she watched the sinking sun turn the courtyard the color of eggplant. The electricity wasn’t working and the room was unheated, a few floor cushions the only furnishings. Amail tucked her bare feet underneath her and pulled up the collar of her puffy black coat. Her dark hair was tied in a ponytail, and her eyelids were coated in metallic blue powder. In the green glare of the mobile phone’s screen, her face looked wan and worried. When the phone finally bleeped, Amail shrieked with joy and put on the speakerphone. A teenage girl’s voice tumbled into the room. 'I’m freezing,' the girl said. Her voice was husky with cold. To make this call, she’d sneaked out of her father’s mud house without her coat.

Like many of the rural members of Mirman Baheer, a women’s literary society based in Kabul, the girl calls whenever she can, typically in secret. She reads her poems aloud to Amail, who transcribes them line by line. To conceal her poetry writing from her family, the girl relies on a pen name, Meena Muska. (Meena means 'love' in the Pashto language; muska means 'smile.')"
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Harder for Americans to Rise From Lower Rungs

Harder for Americans to Rise From Lower Rungs | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Americans enjoy less economic mobility than their peers in Canada and much of Western Europe in part because of the depth of poverty, family background and the gaps between the rich and the rest."

 

"... many researchers have reached a conclusion that turns conventional wisdom on its head: Americans enjoy less economic mobility than their peers in Canada and much of Western Europe. The mobility gap has been widely discussed in academic circles, but a sour season of mass unemployment and street protests has moved the discussion toward center stage.

 

Former Senator Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, a Republican candidate for president, warned this fall that movement 'up into the middle income is actually greater, ... in Europe, than it is in America.' National Review, a conservative thought leader, wrote that 'most Western European and English-speaking nations have higher rates of mobility.' Even Representative Paul D. Ryan, a Wisconsin Republican who argues that overall mobility remains high, recently wrote that 'mobility from the very bottom up' is 'where the United States lags behind.'

 

Liberal commentators have long emphasized class, but the attention on the right is largely new.

'It’s becoming conventional wisdom that the U.S. does not have as much mobility as most other advanced countries,' said Isabel V. Sawhill, an economist at the Brookings Institution. 'I don’t think you’ll find too many people who will argue with that.'

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France Backs Draft Bill Making Denial of 1915 Armenian Genocide a Punishable Crime

"Lawmakers to begin debating bill criminializing denial of 1915 Armenian genocide, though Turkey threatens retaliation if it becomes law." "Diplomatic tension between France and Turkey rose Wednesday, after the French government said it backed a draft bill that would make it a crime to deny Armenians suffered genocide at the hands of the Ottoman Empire in 1915. 'The government backs the idea that genocides can't be denied,' Budget Minister and government spokeswoman Valérie Pecresse said after the weekly cabinet meeting. "Each and every country must have the courage to... assess its history with lucidity." The bill, which French lawmakers are scheduled to examine Thursday, has exacerbated an already frosty relationship between Paris and Ankara. Ms. Pecresse said that while the French government backs the philosophy of the bill, 'it doesn't think it is an attack against Turkey.' But Turkish officials have a different view. In a statement, Turkey's President Abdullah Gul said Tuesday he hopes 'France will not sacrifice centuries-long Turkish-French friendship... on account of petty political calculations.'"
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Daily Show: Exclusive - Lawrence Lessig Extended Interview Pt. 1

Lawrence Lessig believes that money is the root of America's governmental problems.

 

In this unedited, extended interview, Lawrence Lessig explores the corrupting influence of campaign funding on Congress.

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