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Poetry Magazine, November 2011: Discussion Guide

Poetry Magazine, November 2011: Discussion Guide | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Read the latest issue of Poetry magazine-- the oldest monthly devoted to verse in the English speaking world.

 

Getting in Shape

 

The tradition of concrete poetry provides sturdy foundations for several pieces in the November 2011 Poetry. A concrete poem physically resembles its topic: see, for instance, George Herbert’s classic “Easter Wings” (which Michael Robbins mentions in this issue’s review of Geoffrey Hill). See also T. Zachary Cotler’s sloping poem “Clover”:

 

On a brain-gray day,
                                    he lay on the hill-slanted solar

array with a southern exposure,
toes in the clover
                           mixed in with what are these
pentagrammatic sprays
of pinnate leaves.

 

Continued....

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César Vallejo : The Poetry Foundation

César Vallejo : The Poetry Foundation | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Peruvian expatriate Cesar Vallejo was a major poet, known for the authenticity and originality of his work. Deeply rooted in his mixed European and Peruvian Indian heritage, his poetry expressed universal themes related to the human condition. Sometimes called a surrealist poet, "Vallejo created a wrenching poetic language for Spanish that radically altered the shape of its imagery and the nature of its rhythms. No facile trend setter, Vallejo forged a new discourse in order to express his own visceral compassion for human suffering," Edith Grossman writes in Los Angeles Times Book Review. "A constant feature of his poetry is a compassionate awareness of and a guilt-ridden sense of responsibility for the suffering of others," observes James Higgins in The Poet in Peru: Alienation and the Quest for a Super-Reality. His compassion was informed by his own painful experience as an inmate in a Trujillo prison, as an expatriate political activist, and as a witness of the devastating Spanish Civil War. He also endured poverty and a chronic illness of which he died in 1938. Grossman relates, "He saw the world in piercing flashes of outrage and anguish, terror and pity. . . . A passionate, tragic poet, he mourned our loss of moral innocence and despaired of the injustice that moves the world.""

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The 101 Best Chrome Extensions

The 101 Best Chrome Extensions | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
On this page, you will find the best 101 Chrome extensions for all your browsing needs. We’ve taken the effort to categorize the extensions and picked only those we believe to be the best ones and which will most likely be useful to you.
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Occupy Wall Street Has Plenty of Potential: Can you evict an idea whose time has come?

"Both critics and supporters of Occupy Wall Street suggest that the movement’s influence could last decades, and that it might even evolve into a more potent force.

Cornel West, a Princeton professor who has emerged as a prominent voice of the movement, called [the author] from Seattle, where he’d just joined Occupy Seattle protesters at Seattle Central Community College, and was en route to Oakland to participate in more protests there. “We’ve got to regroup and bounce back,” he said of this week’s evictions. “There’s already been a victory. Everyone is talking about corporate greed and income inequality, and that wouldn’t have been imaginable even a year ago.” He added, “To think that New York City spent all of that taxpayer money on policing the protesters and arresting people, while right there on Wall Street are all these financial criminals and no one has been charged. The oligarchs get away with everything. The hypocrisy is just too much to take. The shift towards truth and justice is what the movement is all about.”

Mr. West said he didn’t know where the movement was headed, but “you can’t evict an idea whose time has come.”"
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A Few Ideas for Beleaguered Innovators - Scott Anthony

A Few Ideas for Beleaguered Innovators  - Scott Anthony | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Keep the faith. That's what I said to a client who is going through a crisis of confidence. Over the summer he had put together the underpinnings of what on paper looked like a promising growth business. But — as is usually the case — the more he analyzes, the more he doubts; the more he shows the results of his analysis to senior leaders, the more questions they ask, and the more they doubt.

If you are doing something that hasn't been done before, careful analysis will by definition highlight reasons to not proceed. Market demand can't be validated. Experts dismiss technological assumptions. Partnership discussions stall. There is always something that causes this crisis of confidence. Harvard Professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter has seen this so frequently that she coined Kanter's Law: Everything can look like a failure in the middle. When you first formulate an idea, excitement peaks. But the more you study that idea, the more you realize the challenges that lie in front of you."
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Climate Change to Affect New York State in Many Ways, Study Says

"If carbon emissions continue to increase at their current pace, for example, temperatures are expected to rise across the state by 3 degrees Fahrenheit by the 2020s and by as much as 9 degrees by the 2080s. That would have profound effects on agriculture across the state, the report found. For example, none of the varieties of apples currently grown in New York orchards would be viable. Dairy farms would be less productive as cows faced heat stress. And the state’s forests would be transformed; spruce-fir forests and alpine tundra would disappear as invasive species like kudzu, an aggressive weed, gained more ground.

If the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets melt, as the report says could happen, the sea level could rise by as much as 55 inches, which means that beach communities would frequently be inundated by flooding.

“In 2020, nearly 96,000 people in the Long Beach area alone may be at risk from sea-level rise,” the report said, referring to just one oceanfront community on the South Shore of Long Island. “By 2080, that number may rise to more than 114,500 people. The value of property at risk in the Long Beach area under this scenario ranges from about $6.4 billion in 2020 to about $7.2 billion in 2080.”

The report found that the effects of climate change would fall disproportionately on the poor and the disabled."
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70 Tools 70 Minutes: A Slideshow and Wiki

Presented to Teacher2Teacher Conference, Bow Island, Canada March 2010...

Wiki: http://langwitches.wikispaces.com
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70+ Gift Ideas for Every Kid on Your List: Common Sense Media

70+ Gift Ideas for Every Kid on Your List: Common Sense Media | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Looking for the perfect gift? You're sure to delight kids with DVDs, video games, apps, and books to get lost in. But how do you know what's best for each of the kids, tweens, and teens on your list? We've made it easy with our editors' top selections in movies, games, books, music, TV, apps, and websites. With these high-quality, age-appropriate choices, your kids will be entertained and enriched. And who knows? They just might learn something, too.

Print our 2011 Holiday Gift Guide, and get more than 70 great picks for every kid on your list."
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To End Poverty, What Works, What Doesn't and Why: A Conversation with the Authors of 'Poor Economics'

To End Poverty, What Works, What Doesn't and Why: A Conversation with the Authors of 'Poor Economics' | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Knowledge@Wharton: What, in your view, is the best way to tackle poverty?

Abhijit Banerjee: The central point of our book is that there isn't a single answer, that the question itself is wrong. There is no single action that is going to solve the problem of poverty. There are perhaps a few hundred steps that we need to take, each of which will do something, as long as we take the right steps. There is no evidence that we could adopt one step that is far more important than the others. I think that the one-size-fits-all recipe for tackling poverty is an illusion. It is a convenient illusion, so that you can believe that you can solve the problem with a single step. But this does not seem to be supported by data.

Knowledge@Wharton: But surely of those hundreds of steps, there must be some crucial ones that come to mind when you talk of eliminating poverty?

Duflo: Yes, there are some crucial steps. I can't say they are the most important but these, as we know today, are very effective. However, that is not to say that in the future there will not be other steps which would be even more effective.

According to our current state of knowledge, there is a zone of shadow where we are not sure exactly what to do. But there are some things we do know that work across sectors. Educating children, for example, is one of them -- imparting quality education to them right from a young age. Similarly, there could be positive social and political impact of health care for the poor, which includes steps like better access to preventive health [and] finding ways to put iron, vitamins, etc., in the food that poor people consume, which we know will be good from a medical point of view. Giving an asset -- like a cow -- to extremely poor people, and then some help in taking care of that asset, also works. These, we feel, are some of the effective steps that can be taken in the initiative towards ending poverty."
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The Education Portal - Wikipedia

The Education Portal - Wikipedia | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Education encompasses teaching and learning specific skills, and also something less tangible but more profound: the imparting of knowledge, good judgement and wisdom. Education has as one of its fundamental goals the imparting of culture from generation to generation (see socialization). Education is 'to draw out'. This means facilitating realisation of self-potential and latent talents of an individual.


The education of an individual human begins at birth and continues throughout life. Some believe that education begins even before birth, as evidenced by some parents' playing music or reading to the baby in the womb in the hope it will influence the child's development. For some, the struggles and triumphs of daily life provide far more instruction than does formal schooling (thus Mark Twain's admonition to "never let school interfere with your education"). Family members may have a profound educational effect — often more profound than they realize — though family teaching may function very informally; but formality only proves the education outside the family that is also being taught."

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ASCD Inservice: Report Card Redesign – What Should Be Reported?

"Last week, GOOD magazine announced the winner of its "Redesign the Report Card" contest. The winning entry is a design by Polly d'Avignon, and you can see it here.

As a visual design effort, it's a success. It's gorgeous. It's interactive, designed to be posted on a website and support parent and teacher dialog. The example design is a high school report card. Each subject has its own tab and includes six-week grading period averages, a pie chart displaying the elements that went into the average, and a day-by-day log of graded work displayed as bars with roll-over explanations.

Unfortunately, what has been designed into this lovely display is the traditional report card, with single grades for each subject that mix measures of a student's current status on intended standards with measures of practice (like homework) and participation. None of the current best thinking about effective grading practices summarized in the November issue of Educational Leadership has been followed."
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Teaching History Through Inquiry

"Stephen Lazar describes how teachers can impart both critical thinking skills and cultural literacy through the use of historical documents and strategic questioning.

One of the great challenges of teaching high school history is negotiating two competing charges.

We must equip students with a degree of cultural literacy by exposing them to America's past and humanity's shared heritage. In states like New York and Virginia (where I have spent my teaching career), students must be able to demonstrate this content knowledge when they take high-stakes history exams.

But we must also ensure that our high school students gain the skills and knowledge necessary to be critical thinkers and citizens in our democracy. Our world is saturated with media, and students need to learn how to evaluate the information they encounter, based on where it comes from, who is producing it and when, its use of evidence, and its intended audience.

I have found that teaching history through inquiry provides a model to serve both these masters, simultaneously. Here are some tips on how to do that:"
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All This Havoc / The November 2011 Poetry Magazine Podcast

All This Havoc / The November 2011 Poetry Magazine Podcast | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Poems by Dean Young, Marianne Boruch, and Robert VanderMolen, along with prose from David Shapiro.

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Tips on Tools for Authors, Apps for Educators, Printing & iOS 5 | iPad Academy

"Time for another reading roundup, where I share a few articles I've recently found that offer tips and tutorials for the iPad and apps."
Via John Evans
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Why Science and Engineering Majors Change Their Minds [and What Can Be Done about It]

Why Science and Engineering Majors Change Their Minds [and What Can Be Done about It] | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Roughly 40 percent of students planning engineering and science majors end up switching to other subjects or failing to get any degree.

The National Science Board, a public advisory body, warned in the mid-1980s that students were losing sight of why they wanted to be scientists and engineers in the first place. Research confirmed in the 1990s that students learn more by grappling with open-ended problems, like creating a computer game or designing an alternative energy system, than listening to lectures. While the National Science Foundation went on to finance pilot courses that employed interactive projects, when the money dried up, so did most of the courses. Lecture classes are far cheaper to produce, and top professors are focused on bringing in research grants, not teaching undergraduates."
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‘Near Poor’: Not Quite in Poverty, but Still Struggling

‘Near Poor’: Not Quite in Poverty, but Still Struggling | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"A new Census Bureau measure denotes households pulled out of poverty by benefits or closer to it by certain expenses, and a count suggests they are far more numerous than previously understood.

They drive cars, but seldom new ones. They earn paychecks, but not big ones. Many own homes. Most pay taxes. Half are married, and nearly half live in the suburbs. None are poor, but many describe themselves as barely scraping by.

Down but not quite out, these Americans form a diverse group sometimes called “near poor” and sometimes simply overlooked — and a new count suggests they are far more numerous than previously understood.

When the Census Bureau this month released a new measure of poverty, meant to better count disposable income, it began altering the portrait of national need. Perhaps the most startling differences between the old measure and the new involves data the government has not yet published, showing 51 million people with incomes less than 50 percent above the poverty line. That number of Americans is 76 percent higher than the official account, published in September. All told, that places 100 million people — one in three Americans — either in poverty or in the fretful zone just above it."
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What The Colts Can Teach Us About Team Building - Ndubuisi Ekekwe

What The Colts Can Teach Us About Team Building - Ndubuisi Ekekwe | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"The Indianapolis Colts are 0-10.

For the last nine seasons, the Colts have made the Playoffs. Under the leadership of their future Hall of Fame quarterback, Peyton Manning, they won the Super Bowl in 2007 and lost one in 2010. This team has been a perennial contender in the League. From the coaching crew to the players, people have considered the Colts a solid and balanced ball club. And yet, they've lost ten games and won none this season in the National Football League (NFL)."
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Should Candidates Have to Pass a Civics Test? - Room for Debate

Should Candidates Have to Pass a Civics Test? - Room for Debate | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Rick Perry, Michele Bachmann and now Herman Cain — all caught in an embarrassing moment when their memory failed them or their knowledge was limited.

The federal government requires applicants for certain civil service jobs to take a written exam. The same holds true for the foreign service. And to become a U.S. citizen you have to pass a civics test. Why do we not require a similar exam for individuals who seek election to office?
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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, January 28, 2013 11:52 AM

This is a very compelling question! What do you think?

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Creating Sound Policy for Digital Learning: Three of Five Deep-Thought Papers

Creating Sound Policy for Digital Learning: Three of Five Deep-Thought Papers | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Will the move toward virtual and “blended learning” schools in American education repeat the mistakes of the charter-school movement, or will it learn from them?

Try this thought experiment: How much more successful might U.S. charter schools look today if, at the beginning of the charter movement two decades ago, proponents had spent the time and effort to consider what policies and supports would be needed to ensure its quality, freedom, rules and resources over the long term? What mistakes might have been avoided? Damaging scandals forestalled? Missed opportunities seized?

We can’t go back in time for charters but we can be smarter about the next major phase of education reform and innovation: taking high-quality virtual and blended schools to scale—and to educational success. To this end, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, with the support of the Charles and Helen Schwab Foundation, has commissioned five deep-thought papers that, together, address the thorniest policy issues surrounding digital learning. The goal is to boost the prospects for successful online learning (both substantively and politically) over the long run."
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A Behavior Analyst Looks at Classroom Management

Benjamin N. Witts is "a behavior analyst who works with middle grades students who have emotional and behavioral issues."

In this post he talks about the student behaviors to which teachers attend. He concludes by recommending teachers "create a group of three to five teachers (or more) who will rotate in and out of each other's classrooms about once a month, perhaps during their prep periods. For 15-20 minutes, the teachers should count how many appropriate and inappropriate behaviors the classroom teacher attends to.

Then, each teacher who has been observed tries to raise the number of appropriate behaviors they attend to and lower the number of inappropriate behaviors they attend to. With time, the results should be self-evident. Good luck!"
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Education in South Korea - Wikipedia - Help Improve This Article

Education in South Korea - Wikipedia - Help Improve This Article | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2010)


Education in South Korea is viewed as being crucial for success and competition is consequently very heated and fierce.[2][3] A centralized administration oversees the process for the education of children from kindergarten to the third and final year of high school. Mathematics, science, Korean, social studies, and English are generally considered to be the most important subjects.[citation needed] Normally physical education is not considered important as it is not regarded to be education and therefore many schools lack high-quality gymnasiums and varsity athletics.[citation needed] South Korea was the first country in the world to provide high-speed internet access to every primary, junior, and high school.[4]"

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4 Generations: Water Buffalo Movie by T2 Video in San Francisco

"'4 Generations' is a film short documenting my journey in southwestern China (near Tibet) to first find, then deliver a water buffalo to a poor family. The water buffalo led us to a family with an phenomenal story. Inspired and donated by author, educator, and founder of photo.net, Philip Greenspun."

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Middle-Class Areas Shrink as Income Gap Grows, New Report Finds

Middle-Class Areas Shrink as Income Gap Grows, New Report Finds | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON — The portion of American families living in middle-income neighborhoods has declined significantly since 1970, according to a new study, as rising income inequality left a growing share of families in neighborhoods that are mostly low-income or mostly affluent.

The study, conducted by Stanford University and scheduled for release on Wednesday by the Russell Sage Foundation and Brown University, uses census data to examine family income at the neighborhood level in the country’s 117 biggest metropolitan areas.

The findings show a changed map of prosperity in the United States over the past four decades, with larger patches of affluence and poverty and a shrinking middle.
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Winner: 'Redesign the Report Card' Project - Education

"For our most recent challenge, we asked you to redesign the report card so that it's visually appealing, informative, and inspirational, and gives context to student achievement. We received so many creative entries that we couldn't pick just one, so we asked GOOD readers to check out our seven favorite submissions and vote for a winner. 

We're thrilled to congratulate Polly d'Avignon, whose fantastic design, "Education Engaged" received 37 percent of reader votes. D'Avignon described her report card this way:"
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