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Anatomy Of An Idea: Steven Berlin Johnson

Anatomy Of An Idea: Steven Berlin Johnson | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"People often ask me about my research techniques. You would think this would be a relatively straightforward question, but the truth is that I have to keep changing my answer, because my techniques are constantly shifting as new forms of search or discovery become possible. Right now, I'm in that thrilling stage of writing-while-still-researching my next book, and I just went through a little episode of discovery that I think might be worth mapping out, as a case study of how ideas come into being, at least in my little corner of the world.

 

The subject matter of the book is not all that important here, but suffice it to say that I am currently working on an introductory bit that contrasts old, bureaucratic models of state organization with some new network structures that are currently on the rise. So my mind has been primed for anything that seems thematically relevant to those topics.

 

This particular thread begins with a random encounter on Twitter: checking out my @ mentions a few weeks ago (vanity will get you everywhere), I stumbled across someone mentioning my book to a friend, and also recommending something called 'Seeing Like A State.' (I can't track down this tweet, so can't give proper credit here.) I wasn't fully sure what 'Seeing Like A State' was, but it sounded up my alley, so a quick Amazon search revealed that it was, in fact, a very promising-sounding book written by James C. Scott, about the methods of state organization and control in modern history, and so within a matter of minutes, I was reading it on the Kindle iPad app. (I'm sure it is mentioned in many books that I've read already, but somehow I had missed it over the years.)"

 

Read the rest of the post here: http://goo.gl/xSiJ4 

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Edith Wharton, 75, is Dead in France, August 11, 1937

Edith Wharton, 75, is Dead in France, August 11, 1937 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Edith Wharton, American novelist, died yesterday afternoon [August 11, 1937] at her villa, Pavilion Colombes, near Saint Brice, Seine-etOise. She had been in fairly good health until she suffered an apoplectic stroke yesterday morning and did not recover consciousness."

 

The 150th anniversary er 150th 

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Edith Wharton Turns 150 Tuesday - Slide Show

Edith Wharton Turns 150 Tuesday - Slide Show | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
As the popular “Downton Abbey” proves, stories of Americans mingling with members of the British aristocracy titillate as much as they did when Edith Wharton wrote of them.
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A Challenge to Doubters: Do Something Impossible

A Challenge to Doubters: Do Something Impossible | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Make Your Own List. Make Your Own Future.

 

The article '21 Things That Will be Obsolete in 2020' has elicited a range of responses from readers. One describes a school where much of the predictions are already happening, while others convey serious doubt that any of these will come to fruition — whether it’s due to lack of money or dedication to education, fixation on standardized testing, or just plain jadedness about the possibility for change.

 

I asked the writer, Shelly Blake-Plock, to respond to the comments. Here’s his thoughtful observation.

 

By Shelly Blake-Plock

 

I’ve heard the criticisms regarding how outlandish these predictions seem for low-income schools. And I think a lot of it has to do with the transition period we find our selves in as a society and I think a lot of it has to do with the seemingly endless failures that have shaped the view of many an educator when it comes to the word 'reform.'

 

And so when it comes to digital technology, folks say to themselves: “I’ve heard all that before. I’ve heard about how computers are going to change everything. I heard about how our offices were going to be paperless. Right. I’ve heard about the latest program that’s going to help my kids learn and I’ve seen all the computer games and seen money wasted on computers that are obsolete by the time they are plugged in.”

 

We’re not talking about computers anymore. We’re talking about the way that we connect to one another as human beings."

 

Read the rest of the article here: http://tinyurl.com/7vmlqqf

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The Six 21st Century Skills You REALLY Need

Given the work that I do, I’m a sucker for skill lists. As our work worlds grow ever more complex and challenging, it seems that the skills themselves become more complex too.

 

Increasingly, though, I’ve begun to believe that these lists are distracting us from the real skills of success. While working with big data, operating in virtual teams and”cognitive load management”all sound great, I think there are far more fundamental skills we should be developing first.

 

My 21st Century Skills List

 

I think there are 6 fundamental skills we need to develop for success in this or any other century. I would also argue that we are not nearly as good at these skills as we think we are.

 

In no particular order, my 6 21st Century skills are:

 

1. Self-Awareness
2. Asking Questions
3. Empathic Listening
4. Authentic Conversation
5. Reflection
6. Seeking and working with multiple perspectives

 

Let’s take a closer look. http://tinyurl.com/7qjza9r

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Apple announces iBooks 2, a 'new textbook experience for the iPad'

Apple announces iBooks 2, a 'new textbook experience for the iPad' | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Apple has just announced iBooks 2 for the iPad at its education event in New York City, calling them a "new textbook experience." The newly designed books are graphical, interactive, and make use of features like 3D imaging, embedded video, and multitouch gestures. The company seems to be taking cues from several applications which have been available for the iPad such as Frog Dissection and Solar System, both of which Apple called out at the event. They're also beefing up the notetaking functionality of the iPad, and the books will be available for purchase in the iBookstore directly. Apple has also announced that, at least for the titles it's making available today, the price will be $14.99, and it's just announced its first series of publishing partners."
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New York Inching Closer to Agreement on Evaluations for Teachers

"In the long-simmering debate over how to judge the quality of New York State school employees, there is one thing all sides agree on: a system should be in place. The sticking point has been agreeing about how to do it. There is the fight between New York City and its teachers’ union over the parameters of an evaluation system that must be put in place in 33 struggling schools. And there is the fight waged in court by the state teachers’ union, which sued the Board of Regents last year over its interpretation of a law on teacher evaluations. Some $800 million in federal money is on the line, as well as millions in state aid to local schools. On Tuesday, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo put everyone on notice when he unveiled the details of his budget plan, ordering school districts to settle on a new teacher evaluation system by Jan. 17, 2013, or lose their share of a proposed 4 percent increase in education spending. He gave the Regents and the teachers’ union 30 days to resolve their lawsuit. It is either that, he said, or adopt an evaluation system that he would impose. The sides are not as far apart as their public posture would indicate. Three weeks before Mr. Cuomo set the deadline, the union had already acceded to one of the state’s key demands. It agreed that most of the 60 points teachers could earn on subjective measurements should be based on classroom observations — something the state’s education commissioner, John B. King Jr., had been pushing for. Of the total score of 100, results from student testing would account for the other 40 points."
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Video: More Freedom to Manage Teacher Performance

Schools will soon find it easier to manage their teachers and help ensure they are performing to the best of their abilities.
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New Terrorism Strategy Published in England June 7, 2011

New Terrorism Strategy Published in England June 7, 2011 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Home Secretary Theresa May launches a new strategy for tackling terrorism, calling for more focus on preventing extremism at community level."

 

"'But Prevent must also recognise and tackle the insidious impact of non-violent extremism, which can create an atmosphere conducive to terrorism and can popularise views which terrorists exploit,' she said."

 

"The new strategy also puts a renewed focus on the use of the internet and says the government will consider a 'national blocking list' of violent and unlawful websites.


Under the plans, computers in schools, libraries and colleges will also be barred from accessing unlawful material on the internet."

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‘Open Science’ Challenges Journal Tradition With Web Collaboration

‘Open Science’ Challenges Journal Tradition With Web Collaboration | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Many scientists want to open up an age-old system of submitting private research to commercial journals that they say is hidebound, expensive and elitist."

 

"The New England Journal of Medicine marks its 200th anniversary this year with a timeline celebrating the scientific advances first described in its pages: the stethoscope (1816), the use of ether for anesthesia (1846), and disinfecting hands and instruments before surgery (1867), among others.

 

For centuries, this is how science has operated — through research done in private, then submitted to science and medical journals to be reviewed by peers and published for the benefit of other researchers and the public at large. But to many scientists, the longevity of that process is nothing to celebrate.

 

The system is hidebound, expensive and elitist, they say. Peer review can take months, journal subscriptions can be prohibitively costly, and a handful of gatekeepers limit the flow of information. It is an ideal system for sharing knowledge, said the quantum physicist Michael Nielsen, only 'f you’re stuck with 17th-century technology.'

 

Dr. Nielsen and other advocates for “open science” say science can accomplish much more, much faster, in an environment of friction-free collaboration over the Internet. And despite a host of obstacles, including the skepticism of many established scientists, their ideas are gaining traction."

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Apple to Announce Tools, Platform to "Digitally Destroy" Textbook Publishing

Apple to Announce Tools, Platform to "Digitally Destroy" Textbook Publishing | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Apple is slated to announce the fruits of its labor on improving the use of technology in education at its special media event on Thursday, January 19. While speculation has so far centered on digital textbooks, sources close to the matter have confirmed to Ars that Apple will announce tools to help create interactive e-books—the 'GarageBand for e-books,' so to speak—and expand its current platform to distribute them to iPhone and iPad users.

 

Along with the details we were able to gather from our sources, we also spoke to two experts in the field of digital publishing to get a clearer picture of the significance of what Apple is planning to announce.

 

So far, Apple has largely embraced the ePub 2 standard for its iBooks platform, though it has added a number of HTML5-based extensions to enable the inclusion of video and audio for some limited interaction. The recently-updated ePub 3 standard obviates the need for these proprietary extensions, which in some cases make iBook-formatted e-books incompatible with other e-reader platforms. Apple is expected to announce support for the ePub 3 standard for iBooks going forward.

 

At the same time, however, authoring standards-compliant e-books (despite some promises to the contrary) is not as simple as running a Word document of a manuscript through a filter. The current state of software tools continues to frustrate authors and publishers alike, with several authors telling Ars that they wish Apple or some other vendor would make a simple app that makes the process as easy as creating a song in GarageBand."

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Why Smart Phones in the Classroom Equals Smarter Kids

Why Smart Phones in the Classroom Equals Smarter Kids | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"When Dalton McGuinty [Ontario's 24th Premier] suggested in September 2010 that cellphones and tablets might have useful educational applications, he was savaged by both the press and his political opponents. The Toronto Sun called the idea a “terrible” surrender to already tech-addled kids who want to use gadgets only for Facebook. The National Post likened it to welcoming cigarettes and sharp objects into class. Even Wired magazine panned the idea of gadgets in school as “premature,” citing the potential for distraction, cyber-cheating and a digital divide between kids with the latest gear and kids without. The Ontario Tories picked up all the outrage and ran with it, slamming the notion as “absurd,” a prime example of just how out of touch McGuinty was, and asking, “Shouldn’t our kids be learning math and science instead?” They went on to suggest that if McGuinty gets his way, we will soon have “sexting” in our classrooms. The real concerns parents have about bringing cellphones into class are somewhat less lurid. Kids—boys in particular—are thought to be less literate today than they were in the past. The statistics don’t back this up. The last major study conducted in Canada showed that 88 per cent of 13-year-olds were reading at or above their expected levels. Still, the general perception is that technology is the enemy of literacy. What teacher in their right mind would welcome it into their classroom?"
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Lessons on Democracy from Woody Guthrie

Lessons on Democracy from Woody Guthrie | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"In this web-only video essay, Bill [Moyers] looks back at the life and work of singer Woody Guthrie to draw meaning about the current state of our economy."

 

"With a center being built in Tulsa devoted to the work of Woody Guthrie, Bill looks back at the singer-songwriter’s life and work, finding many points of irony and relevance given the current state of our economy and democracy. Is this land truly made for you and me? In this visual and musical journey, Bill asks the question, and puts forth a sobering answer."

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Heiresses of Wharton’s Era in Fashion on Her 150th Birthday, Tuesday Jan. 24

Heiresses of Wharton’s Era in Fashion on Her 150th Birthday, Tuesday Jan. 24 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"As the popular television series “Downton Abbey” proves, stories of Americans mingling with members of the British aristocracy titillate as much as they did when Edith Wharton wrote of them. [Tuesday,] Jan. 24 is the 150th anniversary of her birth."

 

"In dramas about the British aristocracy we Americans await with tingly pleasure the inevitable moment when the family learns that there is no more money to run the estate, and everyone must retrench or — worse — the heir must get a job. Then, like the arrival of the cavalry in a western, all is saved — the footmen, the ancestral portraits, even the Georgian silver — by the imminent commingling of fortunes with an American kissing cousin who has daughters and dollars. The 'Upstairs Downstairs' details long familiar from novels, movies and television shows, and now from the popular “Downton Abbey,” seem to render us spellbound.

 

The English actor and writer Julian Fellowes, who created the PBS mini-series 'Downton Abbey' and wrote the screenplay for 'Gosford Park,' told The Telegraph that the idea for the series came from a book he was reading at the time, 'To Marry an English Lord,' by Gail MacColl and Carol Wallace. It was about 'American girls who had come over to England in the late 19th century and married into the English aristocracy.' Mr. Fellowes added, 'It occurred to me that while it must have been wonderful for these girls to begin with, what happened 25 years later when they were freezing in a house in Cheshire aching for Long Island?'"

 

"Edith Wharton, whose 150th birthday on Tuesday will be celebrated around New York — she was born on West 23rd Street — knew exactly what she was delineating. She was the ultimate insider, born into the New York upper crust, which she called 'a group of bourgeois colonials' transformed into 'a sort of social aristocracy.'"

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Edith Wharton News - The New York Times

Edith Wharton News - The New York Times | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"News about Edith Wharton. Commentary and archival information about Edith Wharton from The New York Times. 

 

A list of resources from around the Web about Edith Wharton as selected by researchers and editors of The New York Times."

 

"Highlights From the Archives

 

Edith Wharton's New York
By CHARLES McGRATH
Though born in New York, Edith Wharton spent most of her life abroad. In 1913, when she was 51, she divorced her husband of 28 years, the feckless, alcoholic Teddy Wharton, and settled permanently in Paris. The move was a conscious break with America and with her upbringing.
October 1, 2004

 

A World in a Raised Eyebrow, but How to Film It?
By DAVID GATES
The advent of film as a rival narrative mode to fiction seems to have left Edith Wharton's work absolutely untouched. Thank God. If she had felt honor-bound to observe the quasi-cinematic rule of ''show, don't tell,'' as fiction writers have ever since the movies started taking over, it would have put her out of business. Wharton's fiction isn't simply about characters interacting but about the rococo social structures they've built and inhabit, about their minutely elaborate codes of behavior.
December 24, 2000

 

Suffocating in Society And Unable to Escape
By MICHIKO KAKUTANI
The theme that would preoccupy Edith Wharton throughout her life was the idea of society and its power to shape (and destroy) individual lives. As the survivor of a stifling, upper-class childhood, and a socially correct but emotionally and sexually barren marriage, Wharton was familiar firsthand with the suffocating wages of convention. And in the course of an exceptionally long and productive career, she would turn this painfully acquired knowledge into enduring fiction.
April 6, 1990"

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21 Things That Will be Obsolete in 2020 | MindShift

21 Things That Will be Obsolete in 2020 | MindShift | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"This week, we feature the most popular posts of the year on MindShift. This one, which seems most apropos to review on the eve of 2012, took the top spot.

 

[Image from] Flickr: Robert S. Donavan

 

Inspired by Sandy Speicher’s vision of the designed school day of the future, reader Shelly Blake-Plock shared his own predictions of that ideal day. How close are we to this?

 

The post was written in December 2009, and Blake-Plock says he’s seeing some of these already beginning to come to fruition.

 

[Update: I asked Blake-Plock to respond to comments to this post. Read it here. http://tinyurl.com/8634rog]"

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What's an Entrepreneur? The Best Answer Ever

What's an Entrepreneur? The Best Answer Ever | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"This classic 25-word definition pares entrepreneurship to its essence and explains why it's so hard. And so addictive.

 

As an entrepreneur, you surely have an elevator pitch, the pithy 15-second synopsis of what your company does and why, and you can all but repeat it in your sleep. But until recently, I’d never seen a good elevator pitch for entrepreneurship itself—that is, what you do that all entrepreneurs do?

 

Now I've seen it, and it comes from Harvard Business School, of all places. It was conceived 37 years ago by HBS professor Howard Stevenson. I came across it in the book Breakthrough Entrepreneurship (which I highly recommend) by entrepreneur and teacher Jon Burgstone and writer Bill Murphy, Jr. Of Stevenson’s definition, Burgstone says, 'people often need to say it out loud 50 or 100 times before they really understand what it means.' Here it is:

 

'Entrepreneurship is the pursuit of opportunity without regard to resources currently controlled.'"

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iBooks Author: Apple's Mac app to help you make textbooks

iBooks Author: Apple's Mac app to help you make textbooks | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Wondering how in the world publishers will be able to make those fancy new iBooks 2 textbooks? iBooks Author is the answer. Apple has just announced that it will be rolling out a Mac app that assists will make it fairly simple to design and format these new interactive textbooks, allowing users to embed HTML, 3D objects, interactive image galleries, Q&A, and so on — and you can publish to Apple's iBookstore from right inside the app. Additionally, published books can be updated by their authors... granted, math doesn't change very often, but it'll still be useful for correcting typos and errata."
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To Keep or Kill? Lowly Leap Second Focus of World Debate

To Keep or Kill? Lowly Leap Second Focus of World Debate | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"On Thursday, the world will go to battle over a second. In Geneva, 700 delegates from about 70 nations attending a meeting of a United Nations telecommunications agency will decide whether to abolish the leap second. Unlike the better-known leap year, which adds a day to February in a familiar four-year cycle, the leap second is tacked on once every few years to synchronize atomic clocks — the world’s scientific timekeepers — with Earth’s rotational cycle, which, sadly, does not run quite like clockwork. The next one is scheduled for June 30 (do not bother to adjust your watch). The United States is the primary proponent for doing away with the leap second, arguing that the sporadic adjustments, if botched or overlooked, could lead to major foul-ups if electronic systems that depend on the precise time — including computer and cellphone networks, air traffic control and financial trading markets — do not agree on the time. Abolishing the leap second “removes one potential source of catastrophic failure for the world’s computer networks,” said Geoff Chester, a spokesman for the United States Naval Observatory, the nation’s primary timekeeper. “That one second becomes a problem if you don’t take it into account.” But Britain, along with Canada and China, would like to keep the current keeping system, arguing that, in the 40 years that leap seconds have been gracefully inserted in our midst — most recently in 2008 — there have been no problems to speak of, and the worriers have greatly exaggerated the potential for havoc. Remember Y2K?"
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Teachers' Standards in England 2012 - Implementation 9.1.12, Excerpt: Personal and Professional Conduct

Teachers' Standards in England 2012 - Implementation 9.1.12, Excerpt: Personal and Professional Conduct | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Teachers' Standards in England 2012 - Implementation 9.1.12, Excerpt: Personal and Professional Conduct 1

 

Part Two: 

Personal and Professional Conduct

 

A teacher is expected to demonstrate consistently high standards of personal and professional conduct. The following statements define the behaviour and attitudes which set the required standard for conduct throughout a teacher’s career.

 

 Teachers uphold public trust in the profession and maintain high standards of ethics and behaviour, within and outside school, by:

 

o treating pupils with dignity, building relationships rooted in mutual respect, and at all times observing proper boundaries appropriate to a teacher’s professional position

o having regard for the need to safeguard pupils’ well-being, in accordance with statutory provisions

o showing tolerance of and respect for the rights of others

o not undermining fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect, and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs 2

o ensuring that personal beliefs are not expressed in ways which exploit pupils’ vulnerability or might lead them to break the law.

 

 Teachers must have proper and professional regard for the ethos, policies and practices of the school in which they teach, and maintain high standards in their own attendance and punctuality.

 Teachers must have an understanding of, and always act within, the statutory frameworks which set out their professional duties and responsibilities." 3

 

1 Teachers' Standards in England 2012 - Implementation 9.1.12, Excerpt: Personal and Professional Conduct: http://goo.gl/up3jd .

 

2 "Note on Terminology Used / Glossary

Specific terminology used in the standards should be interpreted as having the following meaning:  ‘Fundamental British values’ is taken from the definition of extremism as articulated in the new Prevent Strategy, which was launched in June 2011. It includes ‘democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs’." Teachers' Standards in England 2012, page 4.

 

3 Teachers' Standards in England 2012, page 9.

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DIYbio.org: An Institution for the D0-It-Yourself Biologist

DIYbio.org: An Institution for the D0-It-Yourself Biologist | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"DIYbio.org is an organization dedicated to making biology an accessible pursuit for citizen scientists, amateur biologists and biological engineers who value openness and safety. This will require mechanisms for amateurs to increase their knowledge and skills, access to a community of experts, the development of a code of ethics, responsible oversight, and leadership on issues that are unique to doing biology outside of traditional professional settings."

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For Bio-Hackers, Lab Work Often Begins at Home

For Bio-Hackers, Lab Work Often Begins at Home | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Hobbyists, dabbling in fields like genetics, are part of a movement called do-it-yourself biology, or DIYbio."

 

"Cathal Garvey’s home laboratory in Cork, Ireland, is filled with makeshift equipment. His incubator for bacteria is an old Styrofoam shipping box with a heating mat and thermometer that he has modified into a thermostat. He uses a pressure cooker to sterilize instead of an autoclave. Some instruments are fashioned from coffee cans.

 

In the burgeoning world of citizen science, where the ethos is closer to scout manual than peer-reviewed journal, Mr. Garvey, a 26-year-old geneticist who worked in a cancer research center for about four years after earning a graduate degree, is something of a hero. He is perhaps best known for inventing the DremelFuge, a small centrifuge that can be fabricated by a 3-D printer. His plans are freely available online, so anybody who has the desire and the resources to make one can do so.

 

He and other scientific improvisers, or bio-hackers, are part of a movement called DIYbio, short for do-it-yourself biology, which got its official start in 2008 with DIYBio.org, an online hub for sharing ideas. The site has grown to more than 2,000 members since its inception."

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David Allen: What I Read

David Allen: What I Read | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"How do people deal with the torrent of information pouring down on us all? What sources can't they live without? We regularly reach out to prominent figures in media, entertainment, politics, the arts and the literary world, to hear their answers. This is drawn from a conversation with David Allen, author of the New York Times bestseller Getting Things Done and founder of David Allen Co.

 

I [David Allen] have one of the more non-traditional schedules so the only thing I do regularly is wake up. And even that's questionable. But the first thing I typically do is open my iPad to The New York Times, read an article or two on the front page and then check out the Dining & Wine or Business Day section.

 

During the day, I get at least a book per week to endorse which piles up to the point where I really just have to triage the process. But generally, I don't do much reading during the day. The vast part of my job is consulting businesses and organizations on productivity. I do a lot of networking and managing of client relationships and, of course, being the business's chief evangelist. "

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Google or Apple: I Don’t Want to Choose

Google or Apple: I Don’t Want to Choose | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Apple is set to make an 'education announcement' on January 19th and I’m [Ryan Bretag] frustrated.

 

I’m frustrated that this announcement surely won’t be how Google and Apple are putting aside their differences in the best interest of education.

 

Nope. It is said to be about textbooks, which misses the mark for those like me that envision a learning environment where Google Apps for Education and iPads are foundational pieces for each learner.

 

And it is this missing the mark that puts schools with similar visions in a most precarious spot: choosing between iPads and Google Apps. And it is this missing the mark that makes me throw my hands up in disgust with both groups for forcing schools into a no-win situation."

 

"(Image: Broken Heart Cookie 1, a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike (2.0) image from kaderli’s photostream)"

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Wikipedia will Shut Down for 24 hours on Wednesday to Protest Against SOPA

Wikipedia will Shut Down for 24 hours on Wednesday to Protest Against SOPA | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Today, founder of the non-profit behind information archive Wikipedia, Jimmy Wales, announced that the site will go dark for 24 hours on Wednesday in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA).

 

While only the English version of the site will be down, it accounts for 25 million daily visitors according to Wales:

 

When we talked to Wales in November, he told us that Wikipedia had over 420m unique monthly visitors, and there are now over 20 million articles on Wikipedia across almost 300 languages.

 

As we reported last week, the site was contemplating taking this action along with Reddit who announced that it would black out its site in protest against SOPA.

 

The 24 hour shutdown of Wikipedia will be replaced with instructions on how to reach out to your local US members of congress, and Wales says he hopes the measure will “melt phones” with volume:

 

Along with Reddit, Wikipedia joins huge Internet names like WordPress, Mozilla, and all of the Cheezburger properties in Wednesday’s “black out” protest.

 

The proposed act endangers the future of sites like these by holding them directly accountable for content placed on them. It has been widely reported that if an act like this passed through and became actionable, many Internet businesses would suffer greatly due to new scrutiny placed on them by the government."

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