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New Hampshire Lawmakers Pass Law Allowing Parental Objections To Curriculum

New Hampshire Lawmakers Pass Law Allowing Parental Objections To Curriculum | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"The Tea Party dominated New Hampshire Legislature on Wednesday overrode the governor's veto to enact a new law allowing parents to object to any part of the school curriculum.


The state House voted 255-112 and Senate 17-5 to enact H.B. 542, which will allow parents to request an alternative school curriculum for any subject to which they register an objection. Gov. John Lynch (D) vetoed the measure in July, saying the bill would harm education quality and give parents control over lesson plans.


'For example, under this bill, parents could object to a teacher's plan to: teach the history of France or the history of the civil or women's rights movements,' Lynch wrote in his veto message. 'Under this bill, a parent could find 'objectionable' how a teacher instructs on the basics of algebra. In each of those cases, the school district would have to develop an alternative educational plan for the student. Even though the law requires the parents to pay the cost of alternative, the school district will still have to bear the burden of helping develop and approve the alternative. Classrooms will be disrupted by students coming and going, and lacking shared knowledge.'


Under the terms of the bill, which was sponsored by state Rep. J.R. Hoell (R-Dunbarton), a parent could object to any curriculum or course material in the classroom. The parent and school district would then determine a new curriculum or texts for the child to meet any state educational requirements for the subject matter. The parent would be responsible for paying the cost of developing the new curriculum. The bill also allows for the parent's name and reason for objection to be sealed by the state."

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The Fat Trap | Health

"In the battle to lose weight, and keep it off, our bodies are fighting against us."

 

"While researchers have known for decades that the body undergoes various metabolic and hormonal changes while it’s losing weight, the Australian team detected something new. A full year after significant weight loss, these men and women remained in what could be described as a biologically altered state. Their still-plump bodies were acting as if they were starving and were working overtime to regain the pounds they lost. For instance, a gastric hormone called ghrelin, often dubbed the “hunger hormone,” was about 20 percent higher than at the start of the study. Another hormone associated with suppressing hunger, peptide YY, was also abnormally low. Levels of leptin, a hormone that suppresses hunger and increases metabolism, also remained lower than expected. A cocktail of other hormones associated with hunger and metabolism all remained significantly changed compared to pre-dieting levels. It was almost as if weight loss had put their bodies into a unique metabolic state, a sort of post-dieting syndrome that set them apart from people who hadn’t tried to lose weight in the first place.

 

'What we see here is a coordinated defense mechanism with multiple components all directed toward making us put on weight,' Proietto says. 'This, I think, explains the high failure rate in obesity treatment.'"

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iPad Apps Wiki for Elementary, Middle School, High School and Administrators

"The Palm Beach School System has an incredible wiki where members of the community share their favorite apps for specific disciplines. Below I’ve [Jeff Dunn, Executive Editor, edudemic.com] embedded their list for the top high school apps but they also have a curated list of apps for middle school and elementary school.

 

I wanted to give a mention to the people behind the project. Be sure to reach out to them if you have any questions or just want to let them know that you are benefiting from their hard work:

 

- John Shoemaker (John.Shoemaker@palmbeachschools.org)
- Melissa Lander (Melissa.Lander@palmbeachschools.org)
- John Long (John.Long.1@palmbeachschools.org)

 

(H/T to @rmbyrne for introducing me to this wiki! Be sure to follow him at the always wonderful Free Tech 4 Teachers site.) Most of the links below are to the iTunes store. It may open up iTunes on your computer."

 

Palm Beach School System list of

 

- Elementary School iPad Apps: http://goo.gl/iuaMb 

- Middle School iPad Apps: http://goo.gl/dJCIM 

- High School iPad Apps: http://goo.gl/ohBhL 

- Administrator iPad Apps: http://goo.gl/9zSXz 

 

- Palm Beach School System Home Page for iPad in Education Wiki: http://goo.gl/9zSXz 

 

These resources came to my attention via @JohnEvans on his Scoop.it! iPads in Education Blog: http://goo.gl/i7F2o and Jeff Dunn on his edudemic.com web site: http://edudemic.com/?p=15544. 

 

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Animal Studies Move From the Lab to the Lecture Hall

Animal Studies Move From the Lab to the Lecture Hall | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Once, animals at the university were the province of science. Rats ran through mazes in the psychology lab, cows mooed in the veterinary barns, the monkeys of neuroscience chattered in their cages. And on the dissecting tables of undergraduates, preserved frogs kept a deathly silence.

 

On the other side of campus, in the seminar rooms and lecture halls of the liberal arts and social sciences, where monkey chow is never served and all the mazes are made of words, the attention of scholars was firmly fixed on humans.

No longer.

 

This spring, freshmen at Harvard can take “Human, Animals and Cyborgs.” Last year Dartmouth offered “Animals and Women in Western Literature: Nags, Bitches and Shrews.” New York University offers “Animals, People and Those in Between.”

 

The courses are part of the growing, but still undefined, field of animal studies. So far, according to Marc Bekoff, an emeritus professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado, the field includes 'anything that has to do with the way humans and animals interact.' Art, literature, sociology, anthropology, film, theater, philosophy, religion — there are animals in all of them."

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The Joy of Quiet

The Joy of Quiet | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Trying to escape the constant stream of too much information."

 

"About a year ago, I [This essay's author, Pico Iyer] flew to Singapore to join the writer Malcolm Gladwell, the fashion designer Marc Ecko and the graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister in addressing a group of advertising people on 'Marketing to the Child of Tomorrow.' Soon after I arrived, the chief executive of the agency that had invited us took me aside. What he was most interested in, he began — I braced myself for mention of some next-generation stealth campaign — was stillness.

 

A few months later, I read an interview with the perennially cutting-edge designer Philippe Starck. What allowed him to remain so consistently ahead of the curve? 'I never read any magazines or watch TV,' he said, perhaps a little hyperbolically. 'Nor do I go to cocktail parties, dinners or anything like that.” He lived outside conventional ideas, he implied, because “I live alone mostly, in the middle of nowhere.'

 

Around the same time, I noticed that those who part with $2,285 a night to stay in a cliff-top room at the Post Ranch Inn in Big Sur pay partly for the privilege of not having a TV in their rooms; the future of travel, I’m reliably told, lies in 'black-hole resorts,' which charge high prices precisely because you can’t get online in their rooms.

 

Has it really come to this?"

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125 Great Science Videos: From Astronomy to Physics & Psychology

"Astronomy & Space Travel

 

A Brief, Wondrous Tour of Earth (From Outer Space) - Video - Recorded from August to October, 2011 at the International Space Station, this HD footage offers a brilliant tour of our planet and stunning views of the aurora borealis.

 

A Universe from Nothing - Video – In 53 minutes, theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss answers some big enchilada questions, including how the universe came from nothing.

 

A Year of the Moon in 2.5 Minutes – Video – The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been orbiting the moon for over a year. The footage gets compressed into 2 slick minutes.

 

A Day on Earth (as Seen From Space) – Video – Astronaut Don Pettit trained his camera on planet Earth, took a photo once every 15 seconds, and then created a brilliant time-lapse film.

 

Atlantis’s Final Landing at Kennedy Space Center - Video - After more than 30 years, the space shuttle era comes to a close. Video runs 30 minutes. July, 2011."

 

You can link to these great science videos and 120 more here: http://tinyurl.com/7z9s7et 

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Taliban to Open Qatar Office in Step Toward Peace Talks

"Giving its first major public sign that it may be ready for peace talks, the Taliban announced Tuesday that it had struck a deal to open a peace mission in Qatar.

 

The step was a sharp reversal of the Taliban’s longstanding public denials that it was involved or interested in any negotiations to end its insurgency in Afghanistan.

 

In a statement, Zabiullah Mujahid, a spokesman for the Taliban, said that along with agreeing to set up the office in Qatar, the group was asking that Taliban detainees held at the American prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, be released. Mr. Mujahid did not say when the Qatar office would be opened, or give specifics about the prisoners the Taliban wanted freed.

 

American officials have said in recent months that the opening of a Taliban mission would be the single biggest step forward for peace efforts that have been plagued by false starts. The most embarrassing came in November 2010, when it emerged that an impostor had fooled Western officials into thinking he represented the Taliban and then had disappeared with hundreds of thousands of dollars used to woo him.

 

If all goes as planned, the opening of an office in Qatar will give Afghan and Western peace negotiators an 'address' where they can openly contact legitimate Taliban intermediaries."

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So Here’s What I’d Do : 2¢ Worth

So Here’s What I’d Do : 2¢ Worth | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"...I’m still around, and this all comes around to what got me up this morning, an article posted by Tim Holt in his HOLT THINK tumblr blog. It’s number six of his 10 Bad Trends in Ed Tech 2011. He wrote it on the 21st, but I caught up yesterday, thanks to Stephanie Sandifer’s Tweet. His sixth bad trend is 'Ed tech gurus not offering solutions.'

 

I agree with some of what Holt says, but take exception with a great deal of it.  Scott McLeod expresses much of what I would add to the conversation and brings a great deal of balance. Be sure to read the comments, to which I may add something after I’ve finished this post.

 

For 2¢ Worth, I’d like to turn it into a challenge, “What solutions would you have, David, if you were back in that rural North Carolina school district you left 22 years ago?” I would consider the following ten-action plan is based on my past and current knowledge of that school districts, and would almost surely be altered by a closer association.  But here are the solutions that this challenge brings to mind."

 

1. Eliminate paper from the budget and remove all copiers and computer printers from schools and the central office (with exceptions of essential need). 'On this date, everything goes digital.'


2. Create a professional development plan where all faculty and staff learn to teach themselves within a networked, digital, and info-abundant environment — it’s about Learning-Literacy. Although workshops would not completely disappear, the goal would be a culture where casual, daily, and self-directed professional development is engaged, shared, and celebrated — everyday! Then extend the learning-literacy workshops to the greater adult community."

 

Read David's whole post for the other eight solutions. http://goo.gl/l5u8z 

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What makes a brilliant teacher?

What makes a brilliant teacher? | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Empathy and emotional intelligence are the keys to what our blogger calls "the T Factor."

 

"While watching a brilliant teacher in action, you too may have wondered: 'What is it that makes them excellent?'

 

Do we, as an educational community actually realise what makes a true teacher? Is it purely down to perfect pedagogy, rigorous planning and assessing, diligent resource making and clever behaviour management; or is there something more?

 

As important as all of the above are in excellent teaching, I believe that there is something else, something as of yet not commonly talked about, and it’s called the “T Factor!”

 

In my experience, teachers with the T Factor, run a happy, high achieving environment in which the pupils feel content, valued and achieve high respective standards academically and behaviourally. These teachers create a sense of awe and wonder to develop enquiring minds with an insatiable thirst for learning that endures.

 

'So, what is the mystical T Factor?' I hear you say. Well, put simply, the T Factor is ultimately the teacher’s ability to progressively build, maintain and reinforce high quality educational attachment relationships (linked to the principles of John Bowlby’s attachment theory http://goo.gl/xQEX ). This, in its infancy, can be termed rapport; however, as this is built upon, a quality psychological connection or attachment relationship conducive to learning and attuned interaction is developed and strengthened."

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China Unveils Ambitious Plan to Explore Space

China Unveils Ambitious Plan to Explore Space | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Broadening its challenge to the United States, the Chinese government on Thursday announced an ambitious five-year plan for space exploration that would move China closer to becoming a major rival at a time when the American program is in retreat.

 

Coupled with China’s earlier vows to build a space station and put an astronaut on the moon, the plan conjured up memories of the cold-war-era space race between the United States and the Soviet Union. The United States, which has de-emphasized manned spaceflight in recent years, is now dependent on Russia for transporting its astronauts to the International Space Station. Russia, for its part, has suffered an embarrassing string of failed satellite launchings.

 

China has been looking for ways to exert its growing economic strength and to demonstrate that its technological mastery and scientific achievements can approach those of any global power. The plan announced Thursday calls for launching a space lab and collecting samples from the moon, all by 2016, along with a more powerful manned spaceship and space freighters.

 

In recent years, China has also sought to build a military capacity in keeping with its economic might, expanding its submarine fleet and, this year, testing its first aircraft carrier, a refurbished Soviet model. Under the new space plan, it would vastly expand its version of a Global Positioning System, which would have military as well as civilian uses.

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Video Lecture: Why Students Don't Learn What We Think We Teach

Video Lecture: Why Students Don't Learn What We Think We Teach | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Duke is captivating, and he makes a clear argument that students don't learn what we think we teach because they're too busy learning what we're actually teaching, which is, often, that precision is more important than understanding and that grades matter. The solution, he argues, is to teach, over and over, the things that we actually want our students to remember after the semester is over. And, that we should not defer learning about "The Good Stuff" until after they've suffered through boring prerequisites. Instead, we should teach the good stuff first and teach what we really enjoy.

 

via Darren Kuropatwa: http://goo.gl/y68VA

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Video: No Homework During School Vacations…Seems Like A No-Brainer?

"I [Patrick Larkin] received this video embedded in an e-mail from Vicki Abeles and the folks at Race to Nowhere which talks about schools that have decided that there will be a no homework rule during school vacations."

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The Puzzle of Rising Methane

The Puzzle of Rising Methane | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Methane is already at two and a half times the level that prevailed in the atmosphere before the Industrial Revolution. After a hiatus, it has been rising again in the last few years for reasons that researchers do not fully understand."

 

"Instead, the best evidence – and it is sketchy – suggests that a varied mix of factors led to the increase. In 2007, excess rainfall in the tropics and excess warmth in the Arctic may have led to higher methane emissions from wetlands in both regions, and the excess tropical emissions probably continued into 2008. The methane level of the atmosphere kept rising in 2009, but the reason it did that year is a bit of a mystery. In 2010, excessive rainfall in the tropics may again have been a culprit. Results are still being analyzed for 2011, but so far it looks as though the increase has continued.

 

Other factors, such as the breakdown of gas hydrates off the Arctic coast, could be playing a role, but if so, it is a small one so far, Dr. Dlugokencky said. Another potential source is the rising production of natural gas from hydraulic fracturing, with some of that gas inevitably escaping unburned into the atmosphere. Monitoring can detect, for instance, a hot spot of methane emissions over the Four Corners region of the West, where gas drilling has sharply increased. And the booming economies of Asia are most likely playing a role. But again, the evidence suggests that natural gas production is at best a minor factor."

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Students of Virtual Schools Are Lagging in Proficiency

"Far fewer of them are proving proficient on standardized tests compared with their peers in other privately managed charter schools and in traditional public schools."

 

"The number of students in virtual schools run by educational management organizations rose sharply last year, according to a new report being published Friday, and far fewer of them are proving proficient on standardized tests compared with their peers in other privately managed charter schools and in traditional public schools.

 

About 116,000 students were educated in 93 virtual schools — those where instruction is entirely or mainly provided over the Internet — run by private management companies in the 2010-11 school year, up 43 percent from the previous year, according to the report being published by the National Education Policy Center, a research center at the University of Colorado. About 27 percent of these schools achieved 'adequate yearly progress,' the key federal standard set forth under the No Child Left Behind act to measure academic progress. By comparison, nearly 52 percent of all privately managed brick-and-mortar schools reached that goal, a figure comparable to all public schools nationally.

 

'There’s a pretty large gap between virtual and brick-and-mortar,' said Gary Miron, a professor of evaluation, measurement and research at Western Michigan University and a co-author of the study."

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Harder for Americans to Rise From Lower Rungs

Harder for Americans to Rise From Lower Rungs | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Americans enjoy less economic mobility than their peers in Canada and much of Western Europe in part because of the depth of poverty, family background and the gaps between the rich and the rest."

 

"... many researchers have reached a conclusion that turns conventional wisdom on its head: Americans enjoy less economic mobility than their peers in Canada and much of Western Europe. The mobility gap has been widely discussed in academic circles, but a sour season of mass unemployment and street protests has moved the discussion toward center stage.

 

Former Senator Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, a Republican candidate for president, warned this fall that movement 'up into the middle income is actually greater, ... in Europe, than it is in America.' National Review, a conservative thought leader, wrote that 'most Western European and English-speaking nations have higher rates of mobility.' Even Representative Paul D. Ryan, a Wisconsin Republican who argues that overall mobility remains high, recently wrote that 'mobility from the very bottom up' is 'where the United States lags behind.'

 

Liberal commentators have long emphasized class, but the attention on the right is largely new.

'It’s becoming conventional wisdom that the U.S. does not have as much mobility as most other advanced countries,' said Isabel V. Sawhill, an economist at the Brookings Institution. 'I don’t think you’ll find too many people who will argue with that.'

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Twelve Things You Were Not Taught in School About Creative Thinking

Twelve Things You Were Not Taught in School About Creative Thinking | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

""Aspects of creative thinking that are not usually taught.

 

1. You are creative.
2. Creative thinking is work.
3. You must go through the motions of being creative.
4. Your brain is not a computer.
5. There is no one right answer.
6. Never stop with your first good idea.
7. Expect the experts to be negative.
8. Trust your instincts.
9. There is no such thing as failure.
10. You do not see things as they are; you see them as you are.
11. Always approach a problem on its own terms.
12. Learn to think unconventionally.

 

For the details, go here: http://goo.gl/iWkvE


Via Stephanie Sandifer
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Tool-Making Crows

In the Brevia section of the 9 August 2002 issue of Science, Weir et al. report a remarkable observation: The toolmaking behavior of New Caledonian crows. In the experiments, a captive female crow, confronted with a task that required a curved tool (retrieving a food-containing bucket from a vertical pipe), spontaneously bent a piece of straight wire into a hooked shape -- and then repeated the behavior in nine out of ten subsequent trials.

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China’s President Pushes Back Against Western Culture

China’s President Pushes Back Against Western Culture | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"President Hu Jintao of China has said that the West is trying to dominate China by spreading its culture and ideology and that China must strengthen its cultural production to defend against the assault, according to an essay in a Communist Party policy magazine published this week.

 

Mr. Hu’s words signaled that a major policy initiative announced last October would continue well into 2012.

 

The essay, which was signed by Mr. Hu and based on a speech he gave in October, drew a sharp line between the cultures of the West and China and effectively said the two sides were engaged in an escalating culture war. It was published in Seeking Truth, a magazine founded by Mao Zedong as a platform for establishing Communist Party principles.

 

'We must clearly see that international hostile forces are intensifying the strategic plot of westernizing and dividing China, and ideological and cultural fields are the focal areas of their long-term infiltration,' Mr. Hu said, according to a translation by Reuters.

 

'We should deeply understand the seriousness and complexity of the ideological struggle, always sound the alarms and remain vigilant and take forceful measures to be on guard and respond,' he added.

 

Those measures, Mr. Hu said, should be centered on developing cultural products that can draw the interest of the Chinese and meet the “growing spiritual and cultural demands of the people.”

Chinese leaders have long lamented the fact that Western expressions of popular culture and art seem to overshadow those from China. The top grossing films in China have been 'Avatar' and 'Transformers 3,' and the music of Lady Gaga is as popular here as that of any that of any Chinese pop singer. In October, at the annual plenum of the party’s Central Committee, where Mr. Hu gave his speech, officials discussed the need for bolstering the 'cultural security' of China."

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Bloom’s Taxonomy – A Parent’s Guide

Bloom’s Taxonomy – A Parent’s Guide | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"'Bloom’s Taxonomy' is one of those teacher terms that a parent may not necessarily be familiar with, however, it is very important. It is a central concept to know how to use it at home in conjunction with learning activities to help your child expand their critical thinking skills. Critical thinking skills allow a child to thinking independently, find and fix mistakes, solve problems, evaluate alternatives, and reflect on their own beliefs. It’s not something that can be learned from reading a book or completing a worksheet, however the skills are built through hands-on lessons that build beyond basic rote memorization of facts.

 

Bloom’s Taxonomy http://tinyurl.com/7v8qrot provides learning levels to increase higher order thinking skills for children of all ages. The levels include remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, and create. The way a parent or teacher talks to a child, engaging them in learning, and activities that they provide for learning should have a basis on Bloom’s Taxonomy."

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Will Artificial Intelligence Change Our Relationship with Tech?

Will Artificial Intelligence Change Our Relationship with Tech? | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Advances in artificial intelligence could cause a big change in the way we interact with our devices over the coming year says one of Intel's experts."

 

"...I think in 2012 we will start to see signs of change in our relationships with devices.

 

Here I do not just mean more forms of new interfaces and new interactions. This is less about gesture and voice recognition and more about machines that are contextually and situationally aware.

....

 

Creativity


I think this means we can look forward to our interactions with digital devices maturing into something more like a relationship, and a little less like a lot of hard work.

 

Of course, some of that is a little way off. In the meantime, we have other things to look forward to.

 

The last couple of years have seen a lot of devices to help us download and consume media content. Those have been great and have clearly found a place in many of our homes and backpacks.

 

And there is surely more to come, as we all still like a good story. But I think 2012 might be a year in which our desire to make things, and not just consume things, really blossoms."

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The Ten Habits of Highly Effective Brains

The Ten Habits of Highly Effective Brains | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Let’s review some good lifestyle options we can fol­low to main­tain, and improve, our vibrant brains."

 

1. Learn what is the “It” in “Use It or Lose It”. A basic under­stand­ing will serve you well to appre­ci­ate your brain’s beauty as a liv­ing and constantly-developing dense for­est with bil­lions of neu­rons and synapses.

 

2. Take care of your nutri­tion. Did you know that the brain only weighs 2% of body mass but con­sumes over 20% of the oxy­gen and nutri­ents we intake? As a gen­eral rule, you don’t need expen­sive ultra-sophisticated nutri­tional sup­ple­ments, just make sure you don’t stuff your­self with the 'bad stuff.'"

 

And eight more. Read the whole post.

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The Essential Twitter Dictionary

The Essential Twitter Dictionary | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Whether you’re a Twitter power user or a nervous neophyte, there are some words you’ve just got to know in order to interact on Twitter. We’ve compiled the essential Twitter dictionary so you can tweet with confidence, @mention frequently, and sift through your followers and friends without getting them mixed up.
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Five Things Students Want Their Teachers to Know about Online Learning

Five Things Students Want Their Teachers to Know about Online Learning | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

The Resource for Education Technology Leaders focusing on K-12 educators. "Kids love having the opportunity to learn online but it’s not merely the medium or the technology that students enjoy. At the recent iNacol Virtual Schools Symposium I listened to high school students who have experience learning this way as well as teachers who have experience with these students, share some advice for making this type of learning even better.

 

1. Socialization is important!

2. Students Want to See Each Other

3. Students Want to See Their Teacher

4. Students Want You to Know Them 

5. Keep it Relevant

 

For details, read the whole post.

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Seven Top Leaders on Making Tough Calls and Serving for the Greater Good - Knowledge@Wharton

Seven Top Leaders on Making Tough Calls and Serving for the Greater Good - Knowledge@Wharton | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Seven Top Leaders on Making Tough Calls and Serving for the Greater Good by Knowledge@Wharton, the online business journal of the Wharton School."

 

"On December 5, at historic Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C., a diverse group of seven leaders notable in their respective fields, including New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof and Nobel Prize-winning scientist Ahmed Zewali, took to the stage to discuss their views of the qualities that make a leader. All seven received the 2011 Top American Leaders Award from the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and Washington Post Live, honoring those who motivate people to "work collaboratively to accomplish great things."

 

'It's important to signify to others what is exemplary about people who make a difference in our lives,' said Michael Useem, a Wharton management professor and director of the Wharton Center for Leadership and Change Management, who served on the award's selection committee. 'Identifying why a leader deserves this distinction is a way to send a message to all of us to think about our own development and what to value when it comes to leadership.' Useem noted that the award's selection criteria reflect academic research on leadership qualities that emphasize strategic thinking and mission-setting, looking beyond one's self interest and inspiring others to act.

 

The seven Top American Leaders imparted their wisdom about leadership, including some very personal observations on how they came by the passion that inspires their work and on what irks them most about public life. Common in all their views is that leadership is about serving more than one's self. Insights from the winners [and the audio can be found here:]" http://goo.gl/BlomG 

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The Year in Blogging: 21k12 in 2011, including the Top 10 posts

"It is time for the annual year in review on the 21k12 blog.  Over the past year I have posted just over 150 times, which is down a tad from 165 posts in 2010, but is meeting my goal of averaging 3 posts a week and about 12-15 a month."

 

"Now the list: Top Ten Posts from 2011 here at 21k12:

 

1. Deeply Disappointed: Responding to the New York Times article on Waldorf education and technology (3342) http://tinyurl.com/3nasg9m 
2. Graduation Speeches (2740) http://tinyurl.com/dyu3j8e 
3. The Flipped Classroom Advances: Developments in Reverse Learning and Instruction (2216) http://tinyurl.com/bsvnqt4 
4. Welcome Back to School Letter, August 2011 (1568) http://tinyurl.com/bskor55 
5. BYOD, Bring Your Own Digital Devices: The Next Wave in 1:1 Laptop learning in our schools? (1170) http://tinyurl.com/3fyzxu4 
6. Structuring Personal Learning Environments for Students: Useful Guidance from Wendy Drexler (977) http://tinyurl.com/cdhv2jq 
7. 7 Steps for Leading in 21st c. learning (944) http://tinyurl.com/brggmsx 
8. Awards at St. Gregory: Changes We are Making to Recognize All Our Students (670) http://tinyurl.com/ctdao6q 
9. 15 Ways our Schools Can Prepare to be Relevant and Meaningful in 2015 and beyond (649) http://tinyurl.com/ck9uer8 
10. Celebrating the new NAIS Guide to Becoming A School of the Future (531) http://tinyurl.com/d5asngp "

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