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The Rise of the New Groupthink

The Rise of the New Groupthink | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Solitude is out of fashion. Our companies, our schools and our culture are in thrall to an idea I call the New Groupthink, which holds that creativity and achievement come from an oddly gregarious place. Most of us now work in teams, in offices without walls, for managers who prize people skills above all. Lone geniuses are out. Collaboration is in.

 

But there’s a problem with this view. Research strongly suggests that people are more creative when they enjoy privacy and freedom from interruption. And the most spectacularly creative people in many fields are often introverted, according to studies by the psychologists Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Gregory Feist. They’re extroverted enough to exchange and advance ideas, but see themselves as independent and individualistic. They’re not joiners by nature."

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Response: Ways to Include Students in the Formative Assessment Process

Response: Ways to Include Students in the Formative Assessment Process | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Carol Boston says 'Black and Wiliam (1998b) define assessment broadly to include all activities that teachers and students undertake to get information that can be used diagnostically to alter teaching and learning. Under this definition, assessment encompasses teacher observation, classroom discussion, and analysis of student work, including homework and tests. Assessments become formative when the information is used to adapt teaching and learning to meet student need.'

 

Where and how do we include students in the formative assessment process? What is the role of technology in this feedback cycle?

 

Formative assessment is a critical element in an effective classroom, and is also a buzzword that is often misused. Thanks, Matt, for raising this important question.

 

I'll [Larry Ferlazzo] first try to answer your question, and then have articulate guests and readers respond, as well. My response is partially taken from an upcoming book that my colleague, Katie Hull-Sypnieski, and I are co-authoring.

 

Formative assessment, as I understand it, is an on-going process where both teachers and students evaluate assessment evidence in order to make adjustments to their teaching and learning. Robert Marzano has called it 'one of the more powerful weapons in a teacher's arsenal.'

 

The formative assessment process can strengthen students' abilities to assess their own progress, to set and evaluate their own learning goals, and to make adjustments accordingly. Formative assessment can also elicit valuable feedback from students about what teachers are doing effectively and what they could do better.

 

[The following examples represent] a few activities some of my colleagues and I use to integrate students into the formative assessment process:

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Lean back 2.0 – New Media Demands New Approaches

Lean back 2.0 – New Media Demands New Approaches | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Andrew Rashbass, Chief Executive for The Economist Group, has shared a fabulous presentation called ‘Lean Back 2.0‘ to SlideShare. In it, he presents a case for what he calls ‘Lean Back Media’, a new age of media consumption typified by the way people use tablet devices for reading and browsing. His presentation makes a case for changes to the way The Economist Group approaches its business model, and it is required viewing and reading for any publishing company in the throes of rethinking their operation."

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20 free, awesome social media monitoring tools

20 free, awesome social media monitoring tools | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Tweet Share This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.
Via Carlos Blé
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Supporting Innovative Teachers as Knowledge Generators

Supporting Innovative Teachers as Knowledge Generators | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

We need to start envisioning our teachers as knowledge generators and creative professionals whom we trust to innovate and implement unorthodox ideas that might transform teaching and learning. The time has come to reward innovation among our best and most creative teachers. They should be given the time and resources to reflect on their practice, experiment with new ideas, and implement strategies to more effectively engage learners.


Via Peter John Baskerville, Gust MEES
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twitterforeducation - 21st Century Fluency

twitterforeducation - 21st Century Fluency | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

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Rubrics for Assessment

Rubrics for Assessment | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
A collection of rubrics for assessing portfolios, cooperative learning, research process/ report, PowerPoint, podcast, oral presentation, web page, blog, wiki, and other web 2.0 projects.
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To Find Happiness, Forget About Passion?

"Like myself, today's twentysomethings were raised to find our dreams and follow them. But it's a different world. And as the jobless generation grows up, we realize the grand betrayal of the false idols of passion. This philosophy no longer works for us, or at most, feels incomplete. So what do we do? I propose a different frame of reference: Forget about finding your passion. Instead, focus on finding big problems.

 

Putting problems at the center of our decision-making changes everything. It's not about the self anymore. It's about what you can do and how you can be a valuable contributor. People working on the biggest problems are compensated in the biggest ways. I don't mean this in a strict financial sense, but in a deeply human sense. For one, it shifts your attention from you to others and the wider world. You stop dwelling. You become less self-absorbed. Ironically, we become happier if we worry less about what makes us happy.

 

The good thing is that there are a lot of big problems to go by: climate change, sustainability, poverty, education, health care, technology, and urbanization in emerging markets. What big problem serves as your compass?"

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The Career Of The Future Doesn't Include A 20-Year Plan. It's More Like Four.

The Career Of The Future Doesn't Include A 20-Year Plan. It's More Like Four. | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

The particulars of Hasler's young career can appear exotic and, yes, flighty. But his essential experience--tacking swiftly from job to job and field to field, learning new skills all the while--resembles the pattern that increasingly defines our careers. According to recent statistics, the median number of years a U.S. worker has been in his or her current job is just 4.4, down sharply since the 1970s. This decline in average job tenure is bigger than any economic cycle, bigger than any particular industry, bigger than differences in education levels, and bigger than differences in gender. (Since women are more likely to interrupt their careers for child rearing and caregiving, their average time in a job is even shorter than a man's.) Statistically, the shortening of the job cycle has been driven by two factors. The first is a marked decline in the "long job"--that is, the traditional 20-year capstone to a career. Simultaneously, there's been an increase in "churning"-- workers well into their thirties who have been at their current job for less than a year. "For some reason I don't understand, employers seem to value having long-term employees less than they used to," says Henry Farber, an economist at Princeton. Farber has been documenting the decline in job tenure in papers with titles such as "Is the Company Man an Anachronism?" (Answer: yes.)


Shorter job tenure is associated with a new era of insecurity, volatility, and risk. It's part of the same employment picture as the increase in part-time, freelance, and contract work; mass layoffs and buyouts; and "creative destruction" within industries. All these changes put more pressure on the individual--to provide our own health care, bridge gaps in income with savings, manage our own retirement planning, and invest in our own education to keep skills marketable and up to date. Financial commitments like homeownership or starting a family are a much tougher proposition when one, you can't expect to stay in a place for long and two, you can't expect to ever earn more in real terms than you do at age 40, as recent surveys at Payscale.com suggest.

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3 Equations that can Change Your Life | Daniel Pink

3 Equations that can Change Your Life | Daniel Pink | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Chip Conley is a rare bird. He’s a successful entrepreneur, a provocative thinker, and — get this — a nice guy. Today, he’s out with his newest book, Emotional Equations: Simple Truths for Creating Happiness + Success, and it’s a gem. 

 

In the book, Chip uses the grammar and lexicon of arithmetic to some deeper truths about life. (Ex: Joy = Love – Fear.) Much like math itself, the technique is simple and elegant — so much so that I wanted to introduce it to Pink Blog readers.

 

In the short interview below, I ask Chip to explain three particularly intriguing emotional equations:

 

- You define despair as suffering minus meaning (Despair = Suffering – Meaning). What does that mean?

 

- For Anxiety, you turn to multiplication. You say it’s the product of Uncertainty and Powerlessness (Anxiety = Uncertainty x Powerlessness). Explain.

 

- Surprisingly, your equation for Happiness — which we often think of in terms of more — uses division. (Wanting What You Have / Having What You Want). How does that work?"

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Stephen Colbert to Explore (or Pretend to) Run for President

Stephen Colbert to Explore (or Pretend to) Run for President | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"If anyone can make a mockery of the newest campaign finance innovation, the 'super PAC,' it’s Stephen Colbert.

 

Mr. Colbert, the Comedy Central television host, has made jokes at the expense of super PACs for months — forming his own group, soliciting money for it, then running an ad that featured Buddy Roemer, a long-shot candidate who has criticized the Supreme Court decision that allows the existence of the free-spending PACs so long as they do not explicitly coordinate with candidates.

 

On Thursday night’s 'Colbert Report,' Mr. Colbert took it a big step further, handing control of his group to his friend and fellow host Jon Stewart so that he can legally run for president, or at least pretend to. Mr. Colbert, who has comically flirted with — and mocked the possibility of — runs for political office before, said he would form an 'exploratory committee for president of the United States of South Carolina.'"

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Live Chat: Should Science Be Censored?

"Last month, the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB) took an unprecedented step: It recommended that certain key details in two influenza studies, under review at Science and Nature, be stricken before publication. The studies show how the avian influenza virus H5N1 can be made more transmissible between humans—information that the NSABB worries could aid bioterrorists eager to set off a global flu pandemic.

This week, we'll talk about the benefits and risks of these transmissibility studies and whether they should be published in full, or at all. Also on the table: Should experiments that could help bioterrorists be more tightly regulated—and if so, how?
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Making Computer Science Accessible Worldwide with CS4A

"Last summer, K-12 educators in the Boston, Mass. area gathered at MIT for a bit of summer school. They weren’t there to brush up on freshman year biology, but rather to learn a new subject, the programming language Scratch. This is a snapshot of the Google in education group’s Computer Science for High School (CS4HS) program. The teachers gathered at MIT last July had various backgrounds and degrees, but they all attended with one goal—to bring computer science (CS) education back to their schools, and their students.

 

From now until March 3, 2012, CS4HS is accepting applications from interested colleges and universities for our fourth consecutive year of computer science workshops. If you’re not affiliated with a college or university you can still encourage your local university, community college or technical school to apply for a grant. In the late spring, after applications close, we’ll post workshop websites of participating schools on cs4hs.com for professors looking for ideas and for teachers interested in learning more about what’s being offered.

 

Over the course of the three-day professional development workshops, funded by Google and held on university campuses around the world, participants learn about programming software directly from developers and full-time CS faculty. There is balance of discussion, engaging project work and presentations. The workshops prepare educators to teach programming and computing in their schools and turn their students into computational thinkers and creators."

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Doing Internet Research at the Elementary Level

Doing Internet Research at the Elementary Level | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"One of the hardest things to teach, in my opinion, is research. I have been teaching in a computer lab for going on five years and I have never taught research the same way twice. This is partially because I never teach anything the same way twice, but it's also because each year I learn something new. Sometimes I learn the hard way when things don't pan out the way I planned in the classroom, sometimes I learn because something I didn’t plan arose and worked out well, and sometimes its due to my own self-education as I prepare to teach my annual research unit.

 

I begin teaching research skills in third grade -- just at the time where my students' reading skills are such that they can feel successful and just at the time when they have mounds and mounds of natural curiosity. In the past, I have done your typical find-information-and-regurgitate-it-to-me kinds of projects, all in the name of teaching students how to locate information. As this year's project approached, I decided that I needed to step it up a notch. If I rail against the way standardized tests have taught kids how to regurgitate facts, then how is what I've been doing any different? This year, I took a different approach."

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Leveraging Your Community's Creative Urge

Leveraging Your Community's Creative Urge | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Media companies need to relearn the business they are in at this point in history.

 

Granted, that when customers can copy, redistribute and remix the products they purchase quickly and easily, it makes these kinds of businesses much more challenging to be in. It also fills the field with opportunity for those willing to accept change."

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Every Presentation Ever: Communication FAIL

Ever feel like your communication fails?

 

Via Doug Peterson: http://tinyurl.com/79rqt4u

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Giving Students Meaningful Work: Seven Essentials for Project-Based Learning

Giving Students Meaningful Work: Seven Essentials for Project-Based Learning | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

A project is meaningful if it fulfills two criteria. First, students must perceive the work as personally meaningful, as a task that matters and that they want to do well. Second, a meaningful project fulfills an educational purpose. Well-designed and well-implemented project-based learning is meaningful in both ways.


Via JackieGerstein Ed.D.
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What Online Students Want

What Online Students Want | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Online learning. It’s a popular buzzword in both higher education and K-12 institutions. Each year, more formal and informal learning opportunities germinate online. Globally, many public institutions believe that “online education is critical to their long term strategy” and the number of online learners is steadily increasing (Allen & Seaman, 2008, p.3).

 

As online learning becomes more prevalent, both online instructors and educational institutions are seeking to identify ways to keep online learners satisfied and productive.

 

In the Fall of 2011, I conducted a series of phenomenological interviews to better describe the needs and desires of online students as part of my doctoral dissertation requirements. Specifically, three themes dominated the project (Swanson, 2011).

 

....."

 

More here: http://gettingsmart.com/?p=16318


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Five Manifestos for the Creative Life

Five Manifestos for the Creative Life | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Some days everyone needs a little extra encouragement. The words or lines or colors don’t want to come, or worse, we don’t even want to sit down to create. That’s when we turn to these inspiring manifestos, any one of which is guaranteed to give our uncooperative creativity a sharp kick in the pants. Here are five of our favorite contemporary manifestos that nudge ideas out of your head and into the hands of the world.


Via Jim Lerman
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Presentation Zen: 10 great books to help you think, create, & communicate better in 2012

Presentation Zen: 10 great books to help you think, create, & communicate better in 2012 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"In the spirit of personal kaizen, I [Garr Reynolds] have listed below a few books that I read (or reread) over the past year that you may want to read as part of your own continuous improvement journey."

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In Tennessee, Following the Rules for Teacher Evaluations Off a Cliff

In Tennessee, Following the Rules for Teacher Evaluations Off a Cliff | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Winning a Race to the Top grant brought unexpected consequences for the state’s schools in the form of hastily introduced rules on teacher evaluations."

 

"In the end, it’s all about distrust: not trusting principals to judge teachers, not trusting teachers to educate children.

 

Like a lot of principals, Mr. Shelton has always done 'pop-ins,' quick, unannounced visits that can be as short as two minutes, as long as 15. He says he used to get into every classroom several times a week, every day if a teacher was having problems. After 23 years as an educator, he said, it doesn’t take him long to spot trouble.

 

He says the new state policies put everyone under stress, are divisive and suck the joy out of a building. 'What I need to make my school better is pretty simple,' he said. 'I want everybody to be happy. If they’re happy, they will do a better job.'"

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Things I Want My Future Principal to Read: What To Tell Your Twelve-Year-Old

"I found these two recent articles from the Economic Revolution column in The Denver Post pretty interesting. They're written by Dave Maney who, in his own words, attempts to 'connect the dots to our economic future.' This sums up the thrust of the two articles:


'The prescription for the last few generations has been: Work hard in school, get into a good college, pick a career field with lots of demand, and success will follow. I'm pretty sure that's what my parents told me, and it served me well. But I'm afraid it's largely misguided advice now.'


While I don't believe that education is solely about preparing you for future employment, I do believe that's part of our mission. I also believe that many of the current batch of reforms are being made in the name of economic success and competitiveness, yet they seem to fly in the face of what I see happening. (Which, of course, is probably why these two articles caught my eye, since I agree with much of what he says. It's always dangerous to read too much into something that confirms your own bias, but here goes.)"

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Prepare your 12-year-old for the Economic Revolution

How do you get your 12-year-old ready for a wildly uncertain economic future?


The way we earn our living and get the things we want and need has been turned inside out by an information-powered economic revolution. We can't go home again to a land of steady jobs and predictable do-this-to-get-that outcomes.


So what kind of guidance should we be giving our kids in their preparations for adulthood?


"The prescription for the last few generations has been: Work hard in school, get into a good college, pick a career field with lots of demand, and success will follow. I'm pretty sure that's what my parents told me, and it served me well. But I'm afraid it's largely misguided advice now.


Today and New Year's Day, we'll try to sort out 10 big ideas parents need to understand for our new economic reality. We'll also try to help imagine a starting point to discuss those adult ideas with an audience of 12-year-olds.


The advice is by no means complete, but it's a start. If the ideas feel a bit Darwinian, I'd only say that in a time of economic travail, I'd prefer to help kids get ready for harsh conditions rather than suffer from a lack of preparation.


And for what it's worth, I do have a 12-year-old daughter. This isn't a theoretical exercise for me."

 

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Justice memo argues Obama recess appointments were legal

"The Department of Justice offered a defense Thursday for President Obama’s controversial decision to make several recess appointments while Congress was holding pro forma sessions.

In a memo, Justice argued the pro forma sessions held every third day in the Senate do not constitute a functioning body that can render advice and consent on the president’s nominees. It said the president acted consistently under the law by making the appointments. 

“Although the Senate will have held pro forma sessions regularly from January 3 to January 23, in our judgment, those sessions do not interrupt the intrasession recess in a manner that would preclude the president from determining that the Senate remains unavailable throughout to ‘receive communications from the president or participate as a body in making appointments,’” Virginia Seitz, assistant attorney general for the Office of Legal Counsel, wrote in the memo dated Jan. 6."
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TED2012: Program Guide

TED2012: Program Guide | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"We're in the midst of a dramatic reinvention of the ancient art of the spoken word. The surprising spread of talks online and the explosion of TEDx events around the globe are testament to that. At TED2012 we plan to celebrate this phenomenon and nudge it a further step forward. Full Spectrum is a term we've adapted to mean the rich use of multiple technologies, formats and approaches for the most powerful possible impact on an audience."

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