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Thoughts on the Realities of Moving #beyondthetextbook

Thoughts on the Realities of Moving #beyondthetextbook | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"I [Tom Daccord] followed with keen interest Monday’s #beyondthetextbook Twitter chat stemming from an onsite roundtable discussion at Discovery Communication headquarters. Not only is the future of textbooks a pertinent educational topic, but this particular event (online and onsite) brought together some of the country’s leading edtech integrationists  – David Warlick, Wes Freyer, and Angela Maiers, just to name of few.

While many tweeted gleefully and expectantly about a textbook-free age and transformations wrought by “open” resources, I was struck by the lack of scrutiny of the educational textbook industry. Some might be surprised by what my colleagues and I have learned about industry efforts to leverage the affordances of digital media and the Web. EdTechTeacher has spent nearly 18 months working with McGraw Hill, a major educational textbook provider striving to include 21st century skill development and technology integration topics into its textbooks and other resources. During our visit to their corporate office, and in follow-up conversations, company officials made it clear they understand that the proprietary textbook business model is at risk in an age of freely accessible online information. Yet, the company is by no means passive in the face of the Internet and Google searches and is striving to diversify its publications and create enticing digital offerings. For instance, McGraw Hill, along with Pearson and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (the three dominant educational publishers) has joined with Apple to populate its new “Textbooks” category in iBooks 2 with high-school level textbooks and is piloting the iBooks Author app. McGraw has contributed five K-12 textbooks for the iPad 2 to date and over 50 iPad textbooks for higher education and others markets. Note that McGraw Hill is not acting alone. It joined forces with Pearson and Harcourt to create a triumvirate for its Apple partnership. And in Apple, it’s obviously tied to a worldwide technology leader with deep pockets at the forefront of the exploding e-reader market. Not only is the iPad the leading tablet platform, Apple’s iBook Author is a great first step in the development of intuitive technologies that simplify the digital textbook creation process. (More on this in the next post.)"
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The Sentence as a Miniature Narrative

The Sentence as a Miniature Narrative | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"For a sentence to be a sentence we need a What and a So What."

"I like to imagine a sentence as a boat. Each sentence, after all, has a distinct shape, and it comes with something that makes it move forward or stay still — whether a sail, a motor or a pair of oars. There are as many kinds of sentences as there are seaworthy vessels: canoes and sloops, barges and battleships, Mississippi riverboats and dinghies all-too-prone to leaks. And then there are the impostors, flotsam and jetsam — a log heading downstream, say, or a coconut bobbing in the waves without a particular destination.

My analogy seems simple, but it’s not always easy to craft a sentence that makes heads turn with its sleekness and grace. And yet the art of sentences is not really a mystery.

Over the course of several articles, I will give you the tools to become a sentence connoisseur as well as a sentence artisan. Each of my lessons will give you the insight to appreciate fine sentences and the vocabulary to talk about them."
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Predicting Homework Distraction at the Secondary School Level: A Multilevel Analysis

"Background: Students continue to struggle with homework distraction well into the secondary school years. Recently, the concern over homework distraction has been growing, as new electronic media have offered diverse and nearly ubiquitous forms of diversion to students while they are doing homework. It is surprising to note, however, that a systematic examination of a broad spectrum of factors that contribute to homework distraction is noticeably absent from much contemporary literature. Thus, there is a critical need to examine a range of variables that may influence homework distraction and, consequently, what implications might be drawn from this line of research to help students better handle homework distraction.
Purpose: The aim of the present study is to propose and test empirical models of variables posited to predict homework distraction at the secondary school level, with the models informed by (a) relevant theoretical approaches (e.g., volitional control) and (b) findings from homework research that alluded to a number of factors that may influence homework distraction.

Research Design: The study reported here used cross-sectional survey data.

Participants: The participants were 1,800 students from 97 classes in the southeastern United States: 969 eighth graders from 52 classes, and 831 eleventh graders from 45 classes.

Results: Results from the multilevel analyses revealed that most of the variance in homework distraction occurred at the student level, with grade level as the only significant predictor at the class level. Findings further revealed that at the student level, the variation in homework distraction was influenced by gender, self-reported grades, the context of doing homework at home, and student attitudes toward homework."
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Panel Says Schools’ Failings Could Threaten Economy and National Security

"A report cites critical shortages in foreign-language speakers and a growing lack of expertise in science, defense and aerospace as baby boomers retire."

"The panel made three main recommendations:

¶ Common Core standards should be adopted and expanded to include science, technology and foreign languages.

¶ Students, especially those in poor schools, should have more choices in where they go to school.

¶ Governors, working with the federal government, should develop a national security readiness audit, to judge whether schools are meeting targets.

Not all panel members agreed with all the report’s findings. A dissent by Carole Artigiani, founder of Global Kids, said that a proposed national audit would only raise the stakes for standardized tests, and that money would be better used to improve the neediest school districts. Stephen Walt, an international affairs professor at Harvard, and Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, agreed."
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Reading: Six Ways to Teach It & Reinforce It for Every Child, Every Day

"'Every child a reader' has been the goal of instruction, education research, and reform for at least three decades. We now know more than ever about how to accomplish this goal. Yet few students in the United States regularly receive the best reading instruction we know how to give.

 

Instead, despite good intentions, educators often make decisions about instruction that compromise or supplant the kind of experiences all children need to become engaged, successful readers. This is especially true for struggling readers, who are much less likely than their peers to participate in the kinds of high-quality instructional activities that would ensure that they learn to read.

 

Here, we outline six elements of instruction that every child should experience every day. Each of these elements can be implemented in any district and any school, with any curriculum or set of materials, and without additional funds. All that's necessary is for adults to make the decision to do it."

 

Six Elements for Every Child

 

1. Every child reads something he or she chooses.

2. Every child reads accurately.

3. Every child reads something he or she understands.

4. Every child writes about something personally meaningful.

5. Every child talks with peers about reading and writing.

6. Every child listens to a fluent adult read aloud.

 

To read the whole article, go here: http://goo.gl/VfSSK

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0n Point Radio: Rising Tides

0n Point Radio: Rising Tides | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"A big new prediction of coastal flooding and sea levels rise. We'll look at the moving edge of the water."

"The big new report out on rising seas and coastal flooding makes clear what a lot of Americans already know.  Floods and storm are getting bad.  Life near the beach is getting hit.

The new report says “just wait”.  Rising seas driven by global warming are going to bite deeper, sooner than most people imagine.  Hitting millions.  Costing billions, trillions.  Putting homes at risk, but also roads, bridges, military bases, farmland, schools, hospitals."
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Civility and American Democracy: A National Forum

Civility and American Democracy: A National Forum | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Tom recently moderated a discussion between a group of leading historians, scholars, political scientists and journalists about the meaning of civility and its role in our public discourse. Panelists included  Joe Klein of Time Magazine/CNN and syndicated columnists Kathleen Parker and Ellen Goodman. Both live and online audiences participated in the event.

You can a two-hour program here (http://goo.gl/XTKjS), featuring highlights from the forum “Civility and American Democracy: A National Forum.”
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Test Driving a Pilot Teacher Evaluation System

Test Driving a Pilot Teacher Evaluation System | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"The big debate in education now is how to determine who’s an effective teacher. New York City set off a controversy by ranking teachers based on their students’ performance on state exams."

 

"Ms. Moloney has been testing a new framework for evaluating teachers this year at the school, which is actually in Brighton Beach, after receiving training over the summer. It was designed by Charlotte Danielson who wrote a common-sense framework to help both teachers and administrators identify good teaching.

 

It’s similar to a tool kit, with 22 strategies every teacher should master. The city is trying out the Danielson framework at 107 schools to learn how much training principals need so they can become certified evaluators once the state’s evaluation system goes into effect, said Kirsten Busch, executive director of the Office of Teacher Effectiveness. The city has until next January to negotiate an evaluation system with its teachers’ union.

 

At P.S. 100, Ms. Moloney and her teachers believe classroom observations are much more valid than a controversial rating system the city used that was based solely on student progress on state exams."

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A Testament to a Sioux Warrior--and Persistence

A Testament to a Sioux Warrior--and Persistence | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Q's About the News | How Much Progress Has Been Made on South Dakota's Monument to Crazy Horse?"

 

WHERE is the sculpture shown above?

WHOM does the monument depict?
WHO was recruited to create the monument?
WHO recruited him?

WHEN did the work begin?

WHAT is the “multigenerational commitment” the article writer describes?
WHAT are some of the criticisms of the project?
WHAT do supporters say?

HOW are the costs of creating the monument covered?
HOW big will it be upon completion, according to Korczak Ziolkowski’s design?
HOW did the idea for the monument come about?

WHY is the Crazy Horse monument often compared to Mount Rushmore?

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Video: Supreme Court to Offer Health Care Argument Audio

Video: Supreme Court to Offer Health Care Argument Audio | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
The Supreme Court announced Friday it would provide same-day audio of the arguments challenging the 2010 health-care law, following a front page WSJ story on the crush for tickets to the proceedings. Jess Bravin has details on The News Hub.
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Defending Climate Science’s Place In The Classroom

Defending Climate Science’s Place In The Classroom | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

The National Center for Science Education has long defended educators’ right to teach evolution in public schools. Now climate science too is under attack. NCSE executive director Eugenie Scott talks about how teachers and parents can fight the push to get climate change denial into the classroom.

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BYOD and the Library (Bring You Own Digital Device)

BYOD and the Library (Bring You Own Digital Device) | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"So what does this have to do with libraries? These are some things all librarians should be asking themselves if their schools are figuring out means of giving all students continuous access to online resources, whether student or school owned.

1. Do my library rules and policies help students take advantage of their mobile computing devices?
2. Can students and staff get knowledgeable support from my library staff when they have technical problems?
3. Am I selecting library resources with mobile computing devices in mind?
4. In my role as instructional leader, am I using best practices that take advantage of a ubiquitous technology environment - and helping my teachers do so as well?
5. Do I exemplify a learner who takes advantage of having continuous access to my PLN and to the world's information?"
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Edit, Upload, And Share Videos On Vimeo 2.0 For iPhone & iPad

Edit, Upload, And Share Videos On Vimeo 2.0 For iPhone & iPad | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Last week, the 2.0 version of Vimeo, was released with significant user interface changes and performance enhancements for iOS devices.
Via John Evans
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bangdoll's comment, March 10, 2012 10:43 AM
I like vimeo
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My Life's Sentences

My Life's Sentences | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"In college, I used to underline sentences that struck me, that made me look up from the page. They were not necessarily the same sentences the professors pointed out, which would turn up for further explication on an exam. I noted them for their clarity, their rhythm, their beauty and their enchantment. For surely it is a magical thing for a handful of words, artfully arranged, to stop time. To conjure a place, a person, a situation, in all its specificity and dimensions. To affect us and alter us, as profoundly as real people and things do."

"I remember reading a sentence by Joyce, in the short story “Araby.” It appears toward the beginning. “The cold air stung us and we played till our bodies glowed.” I have never forgotten it. This seems to me as perfect as a sentence can be. It is measured, unguarded, direct and transcendent, all at once. It is full of movement, of imagery. It distills a precise mood. It radiates with meaning and yet its sensibility is discreet.

When I am experiencing a complex story or novel, the broader planes, and also details, tend to fall away. Rereading them, certain sentences are what greet me as familiars. You have visited before, they say when I recognize them. We encounter books at different times in life, often appreciating them, apprehending them, in different ways. But their language is constant. The best sentences orient us, like stars in the sky, like landmarks on a trail."

This is the first article in Draft, a new series about the art and craft of writing.
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School Leaders Must Embrace Change

"In addition to communication, change managers will depend on clear processes for some of the most common aspects of change management, including:

-knowing where to access resources;
- knowing how to access and use data to monitor processes and progress;
- coordinating and supervising the work of change facilitators who will contribute to different aspects of the work;
- knowing how to enroll, engage, and maintain commitment to such a significant change effort;
- assessing and managing professional learning needs of staff and supporting implementation of that learning;
- establishing structures and systems within the school to facilitate major change such as creating time for staff collaboration and systems for regular updating an reporting on progress;
-providing opportunities to solve inevitable problems of practice in expedient ways;
- challenging assumptions that create barriers to transformation;
-providing and receiving feedback from staff and students about the changes; and
- celebrating the small successes while maintaining pressure to achieve the larger ones."
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When Technology Overwhelms You, Get Organized

When Technology Overwhelms You, Get Organized | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"All the new tools in the workplace can leave us dizzy, undermining our ability to get things done. But there are ways to return to a more productive path."

"You can ... use a sequence of five events to optimize your focus and resources, whether you’re trying to get it together in your kitchen, your conversation, your contract, your company or your country.

• Capture everything that has your attention, in your work and your personal life, in writing. Maybe it’s your departmental budget, a meeting with the new boss, an overdue vacation, or just the need to buy new tires and a jar of mayonnaise. For the typical professional, it can take one to six hours to "empty the attic" of your head. It may seem daunting, but this exercise invariably leads to greater focus and control.

• Clarify what each item means to you. Decide what results you want and what actions — if any — are required. If you simply make a list and stop there, without putting the items in context, you’ll be stuck in the territory of compulsive list-making, which ultimately won’t relieve the pressure. What’s the next action when it comes to your budget? The next step in arranging your vacation? Applying this simple but rigorous model puts you in the driver’s seat; otherwise, your lists will hold your psyche hostage. And keep in mind that much progress can be made and stress relieved by applying the magic two-minute rule — that any action that can be finished in two minutes should be done in the moment.

• Organize reminders of your resulting to-do lists — for the e-mails you need to send, the phone calls you need to make, the meetings you need to arrange, the at-home tasks you need to complete. Park the inventory of all your projects in a convenient place.

• Regularly review and reflect on the whole inventory of your commitments and interests, and bring it up to date. As your needs change, what can move to the front burner, and what can go further back? Make these decisions while considering your overall principles, goals and accountabilities. Schedule a two-hour, weekly operational review, allowing space to clean up, catch up and do some reflective overseeing of the landscape, for all work and personal goals, commitments and activities.

• Finally, deploy your attention and resources appropriately.

Does our productivity really depend on this basic set of behaviors and thought processes? So it seems. Everyone is already half-trying to do all of this, all the time. But many people just haven’t identified the process, or applied it."
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Blended Learning Sports Variety of Approaches

Blended Learning Sports Variety of Approaches | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Educators are identifying promising models for mixing online learning and face-to-face instruction that emphasize a more personalized approach to education."

 

"As blended learning models, which mix face-to-face and online instruction, become more common in schools, classroom educators and administrators alike are navigating the changing role of teachers—and how schools can best support them in that new role.

 

'This is a whole new world for education,' says Royce Conner, the acting head of school for the 178-student San Francisco Flex Academy, a public charter school.

 

In the grades 9-12 school, students spend about half the day working on 'the floor'—a large open room of study carrels where students hunker down with their laptops to work with online curricula provided by K12 Inc.—and the other half of the day in pullout groups with teachers. Which students are in pullout groups, when the groups meet, and how often they meet depend on the progress each student is making in his or her online classes, says Conner.

 

Having a passion for using data is one of the skills that Conner looks for in his teachers, he says, since it becomes such an integral part of their planning process each week."

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Darling-Hammond, et. al.: Value-Added Teacher Evaluation Models Ratings Not Sufficiently Reliable or Valid

"There is a growing consensus that evidence of teachers’ contributions to student learning should be a component of teacher evaluation systems, along with evidence about the quality of teachers’ practice. Value-added models (VAMs), designed to evaluate student test score gains from one year to the next are often promoted as tools to accomplish this goal. However, current research suggests that VAM ratings are not sufficiently reliable or valid to support high-stakes, individual-level decisions about teachers. Other tools for teacher evaluation have shown greater success in measuring and improving teaching, especially those that examine teachers’ practices in relation to professional standards."

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Rising Sea Levels a Growing Risk to Coastal U.S., Study Says

Rising Sea Levels a Growing Risk to Coastal U.S., Study Says | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"If the pace of the rise accelerates as much as expected, researchers found, coastal flooding at levels that were once exceedingly rare could become an every-few-years occurrence by the middle of this century."
......

"'Sea level rise is like an invisible tsunami, building force while we do almost nothing,' said Benjamin H. Strauss, an author, with other scientists, of two new papers outlining the research. 'We have a closing window of time to prevent the worst by preparing for higher seas.'

The project on sea level rise led by Dr. Strauss for the nonprofit organization Climate Central appears to be the most elaborate effort in decades to estimate the proportion of the national population at risk from the rising sea. The papers are scheduled for publication on Wednesday by the journal Environmental Research Letters. The work is based on the 2010 census and on improved estimates, compiled by federal agencies, of the land elevation near coastlines and of tidal levels throughout the country.

Climate Central, of Princeton, N.J., was started in 2008 with foundation money to conduct original climate research and also to inform the public about the work of other scientists. For the sea level project, financed entirely by foundations, the group is using the Internet to publish an extensive package of material that goes beyond the scientific papers, specifying risks by community. People can search by ZIP code to get some idea of their own exposure."
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The City 2.0: The Wish | The Video | The Plan | The Needs | The Questions

The City 2.0: The Wish | The Video | The Plan | The Needs | The Questions | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

The City 2.0: THE WISH

 

I am the crucible of the future.
I am where humanity will either flourish or fade.
I am being built and rebuilt every day.
I am inevitable. But I am not yet determined.
I wish to be inclusive, innovative, healthy, soulful, thriving. But my potential can only be reached through you.

 

You can forge a new urban outlook. Begin by connecting. Imagine a platform that brings you together, locally and globally. Combine the reach of the cloud with the power of the crowd. Connect leaders, experts, companies, organizations and citizens. Share your tools, data, designs, successes, and ideas. Turn them into action.

 

Together you can:

- Bridge the gap between poor and rich communities.
- Spectacularly reduce your carbon footprint.
- Make nature part of daily life.
- Empower entrepreneurship.
- Re-imagine education.
- Nurture health.


I am the City 2.0. Dream me. Build me. Make me real.

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The Odds Ever in Your Favor: Ideas and Resources for Teaching 'The Hunger Games'

The Odds Ever in Your Favor: Ideas and Resources for Teaching 'The Hunger Games' | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Ideas for teaching the trilogy, as well as lists of resources from The Times, the Learning Network and around the Web -- including many fan tributes from young adults."

 

"If you’re like many of the students who post on The Learning Network, you won’t have to consult the Movies section to answer the question, “When will the first film in the ‘Hunger Games’ trilogy come out?” (March 23. But you already knew that, right?)

 

These dystopian young-adult novels, which have “pretty much owned” The Times’s children’s series bestseller list for a year and a half, have, like the “Harry Potter” and “Twilight” series before them, enthralled fans of all ages and backgrounds.

 

Many educators see them as a way to both excite avid readers and hook reluctant ones, and have devised imaginative ways to teach with them already.

 

Below, our own Times-inspired ideas, some of which were contributed by “Hunger Games” enthusiast and Learning Network college intern Lily Altavena, who also scoured the Web for wonderful fan-created art and writing and other resources that might inspire.

 

Are your students obsessed? How do you teach these novels? Tell us below."

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How Google, General Electric and DreamWorks Innovate

How Google, General Electric and DreamWorks Innovate | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

The reshaping of the modern workplace also involves new approaches to innovation. Here, executives at Google, General Electric and DreamWorks Animation summarize their companies’ paths to creativity.

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Supreme Court to Release Same-Day Audio of Health Care Arguments

Supreme Court to Release Same-Day Audio of Health Care Arguments | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"For anyone who doubts the power of the press, consider how the Supreme Court of the United States snapped to attention after Friday’s Wall Street Journal story reporting the crush for tickets to the health care law arguments that begin March 26.

Just hours after the Page One piece appeared, the court announced it would provide same day audio of the arguments “as soon as the digital files are available for uploading to the Website.” That should be no later than 2 p.m. for the morning arguments on March 26, 27 and 28. March 28 also will feature afternoon arguments, which are to be posted no later than 4 p.m., the court said."
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Sizing Up America’s High-Tech Talent

Sizing Up America’s High-Tech Talent | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Business and political leaders have repeatedly warned that America’s scientists and engineers are in short supply. However, some economists say the numbers indicate the opposite -- a glut of high-tech workers. A panel of experts debate whether America’s schools produce the scientific workforce needed to compete globally.

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How to Be Creative

How to Be Creative | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"The image of the 'creative type' is a myth. Jonah Lehrer on why anyone can innovate—and why a hot shower, a cold beer or a trip to your colleague's desk might be the key to your next big idea. From Imagine: How Creativity Works."

"Creativity can seem like magic. We look at people like Steve Jobs and Bob Dylan, and we conclude that they must possess supernatural powers denied to mere mortals like us, gifts that allow them to imagine what has never existed before. They're "creative types." We're not.

But creativity is not magic, and there's no such thing as a creative type. Creativity is not a trait that we inherit in our genes or a blessing bestowed by the angels. It's a skill. Anyone can learn to be creative and to get better at it. New research is shedding light on what allows people to develop world-changing products and to solve the toughest problems. A surprisingly concrete set of lessons has emerged about what creativity is and how to spark it in ourselves and our work.

The science of creativity is relatively new. Until the Enlightenment, acts of imagination were always equated with higher powers. Being creative meant channeling the muses, giving voice to the gods. ("Inspiration" literally means "breathed upon.") Even in modern times, scientists have paid little attention to the sources of creativity.

But over the past decade, that has begun to change. Imagination was once thought to be a single thing, separate from other kinds of cognition. The latest research suggests that this assumption is false. It turns out that we use "creativity" as a catchall term for a variety of cognitive tools, each of which applies to particular sorts of problems and is coaxed to action in a particular way."

Interesting comments here: http://goo.gl/xWc3o
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