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Climate Change Doubter Heartland Institute Documents Leaked: Reshaping the Discussion of Climate Change in Classrooms.

"Heartland says that a document in the recently released mix, entitled 2012 Heartland Climate Strategy is a fake. But several of the key points the document makes are backed up elsewhere. Most notably, in a fundraising document, Heartland identifies one of its priorities as reshaping the discussion of climate change in classrooms.

The document says, “Many people lament the absence of educational material suitable for K-12 students on global warming that isn’t alarmist or overtly political. Heartland has tried to make material available to teachers, but has had only limited success. Principals and teachers are heavily biased toward the alarmist perspective.”

Heartland is working with a consultant named David Wojick to develop a K-12 curriculum “to help teach the scientific debate regarding climate change.”

In an email, Wojick said he approached Heartland to fund his project, which would help educators “teach one of the greatest scientific debates in history. This means teaching both sides of the science, more science, not less.”

The problem is that there is very little debate among the world’s climatologists about the vast body of peer-reviewed data that has shown that human consumption of fossil fuels has led to a warming of the planet. The debate in the United States is largely political.

Wojick has been “a part-time support contractor for the Office of Scientific and Technical Information since 2003, working to help the office manage and organize its electronic databases. He has never advised or conducted research for the Department on climate change or any other scientific topic, and the office he works for is not a research organization,” said Jen Stutsman, a spokeswoman for  the Energy Department.

Wojick is not a scientist. His academic background, he said, is “in the logic (or philosophy) of science.”

If Heartland goes with Wojick’s project, it would come at a time when science teachers already feel increasingly nervous about teaching climate change because in some places it is becoming as politicized as teaching evolution."
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Upgrading Voter Registration: Pew Center on the States

Upgrading Voter Registration: Pew Center on the States | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Approximately 24 million active voter registrations in the United States are no longer valid or have significant inaccuracies, according to the Pew Center on the States. Research in Pew's report, Inaccurate, Costly, and Inefficient, underscores the need for registration systems that better maintain voter records, save money, and streamline processes. This is an effort that eight states are spearheading with Pew’s support. 

The report highlights the challenges nationwide: 

• At least 51 million eligible citizens remain unregistered—more than 24 percent of the eligible population. 
• More than 1.8 million deceased individuals are listed as active voters.
• Approximately 2.75 million people have active registrations in more than one state.
• About 12 million records have incorrect addresses, meaning either the voters moved, or errors in the information make it unlikely any mailings can reach them."
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We Don't Need a Digital Sabbath, We Need More Time

We Don't Need a Digital Sabbath, We Need More Time | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"The reason is that if we allow ourselves to blame the technology for distracting us from our children or connecting with our communities, then the solution is simply to put away the technology. We absolve ourselves of the need to create social, political, and, sure, technological structures that allow us to have the kinds of relationships we want with the people around us. We need to realize that at the core of our desire for a Sabbath isn't a need to escape the blinking screens of our electronic world, but the ways that work and other obligations have intruded upon our lives and our relationships.

 

We can begin by mimicking the Sabbath in small, by recognizing that by dedicating time to one activity or one person, without interruption from gadgets, work, or other people, will help us slow down and connect. We can use our gadgets to do this -- a long talk on the phone is the most obvious way -- or we can leave them out of it.

 

Such minimal steps won't build something profound like Heschel's "palace in time." They'll result in something smaller -- something more like little forts in time. And there, in these forts, we can take shelter, replenish our resources, and gear up for the battles of the week ahead."


Via Howard Rheingold
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The Educator’s Guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons | The Edublogger

The Educator’s Guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons | The Edublogger | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

With this post the folks at Edublogger, hope to dispel a few myths and pull together a complete list of resources for teachers and students to use when blogging and working with content online.


Via Judy O'Connell
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A Comprehensive Guide to Scoop.it for Content Curation

A Comprehensive Guide to Scoop.it for Content Curation | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Content curation, on the other hand, is much like museum curation. The objects in a museum have value, for whatever reason – historical and artistic beauty are just two I can think of off the top of my head. These objects are carefully displayed, carefully picked over – less than half of what comes in to museums actually gets shown for public consumption.


Via Nik Peachey
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A Catalogue of Social Media (and Related) Tools

A Catalogue of Social Media (and Related) Tools | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"I [Alan Rosenblatt] have assembled a catalogue of 85 tools to help you run a more effective social media program for your campaign, organization, or business. Most of these are free. A lot are for Twitter. Many help you leverage Facebook and other social media too. Some help you find the best content to share via social media.

 

Some of these tools are more useful than others. But I expect you will disagree over which are the most and least useful. That is why I have included such a wide range of tools.

 

You will find tools for measuring, monitoring, and engaging your social media audience.

If you know of more tools worth adding to this list, I encourage you to post them in the comments.

Have fun exploring these. There are some real gems in here."

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The Dos and Don’ts of Twitter Hashtags

The Dos and Don’ts of Twitter Hashtags | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

It’s difficult to express how annoying the misuse of hashtags on Twitter is. While there are definitely some upsides to using the popular conversation-tracking feature, there are many of us on Twitter who either simply don’t understand how to use them appropriately, or think it’s funny to overuse them.

 

Inspired by recent hashtag fatigue, we’ve decided to help out our readers with this helpful do-and-don’t guide on the proper use of hashtags via Twitter. Enjoy.

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Drilling Reaches Lake Vostok, Long Trapped Under Antarctic Ice Sheet

Drilling Reaches Lake Vostok, Long Trapped Under Antarctic Ice Sheet | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Scientists said Wednesday they had reached the waters of a lake that has been sealed off for millions of years.
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Why French Parents Are Superior

Why French Parents Are Superior | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"While Americans fret over modern parenthood, the French are raising happy, well-behaved children without all the anxiety. Pamela Druckerman on the Gallic secrets for avoiding tantrums, teaching patience and saying non with authority."

"Pamela Druckerman's new book "Bringing Up Bebe," catalogs her observations about why French children seem so much better behaved than their American counterparts. She talks with WSJ's Gary Rosen about the lessons of French parenting techniques.

When my daughter was 18 months old, my husband and I decided to take her on a little summer holiday. We picked a coastal town that's a few hours by train from Paris, where we were living (I'm American, he's British), and booked a hotel room with a crib. Bean, as we call her, was our only child at this point, so forgive us for thinking: How hard could it be?"
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Student Assessments Facing Stiff Backlash in Texas

Parents and educators are expressing strong concern about the central role of standardized testing in the assessment and overall education of their children and students.
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Ed. Dept., FCC Unveil 'Digital Textbook Playbook'

"U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Federal Communications Chairman Julius Genachowski were on hand to unveil the new "Digital Textbook Playbook," a resource designed by the Digital Textbook Collaborative to help guide educators in their transition to electronic resources, as the pair headlined a national online town hall meeting for the inaugural Digital Learning Day.

Genachowski also challenged states and educational content suppliers to ensure that all students nationwide have access to digital educational resources within five years, and he announced he will be convening the chiefs of major digital education companies in March to create a plan to meet such a challenge.

'Our country has proved over and over again that we can do anything," Genachowski said. "We'll use every lever we can.'"
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How to Fight The Man

How to Fight The Man | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
The viral phenomenon of “Why I Hate Religion, but Love Jesus” and the debate that it prompted have a fogy offering advice on how to beat the fogies.
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Byron Dorgan on Making Banks Play by the Rules

"Bill Moyers talks with former Senator Byron Dorgan about making sure big banks play by rules that protect consumers from financial calamity, and how those big banks continue to leverage power and influence to avoid responsibility while maximizing profits. Dorgan was a nearly-lone voice in Congress in 1999 when he predicted economic calamity following a repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act and its protective measures. But given the economic meltdown nearly 10 years later, it turned out to be one of the most prescient speeches in American political history.

“If you were to rank big mistakes in the history of this country,” Dorgan tells Moyers, “that was one of the bigger ones, because it has set back this country in a very significant way and caused so much heartbreak and heartache, and a near total collapse of the American economy. ”"
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10 Ways to Bring A Conference Back to Work

10 Ways to Bring A Conference Back to Work | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"When it comes to conferences, a better slogan would be, "What happens in Vegas should NOT stay in Vegas." If you're one of the fortunate people from your organization to attend a professional conference, how can you bring it back to the workplace so everyone can benefit?

 

During sessions, keynotes, hallway conversations and after-hours discussions, many great ideas are tossed around. Don't let them stay in Vegas! Share them when you get back.

 

Sharing what you've learned will not only benefit others in your workplace, it may help you take better notes and stay more organized during the conference. The pressure of knowing that you'll need to convey the best of the conference tends to help a person plan ahead.

 

If you're ready to hone your leadership skills, here are ten ideas for how you can bring the conference back to work to share the knowledge gained with others."


Via Stephanie Sandifer
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Following the Wolf Pack

Following the Wolf Pack | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Tracking wolves can lead to surprising observations, but getting the full picture means chasing after wolf scat."

"Thursday, Feb. 2

We see two wolves sleeping with full bellies in the bright sun. Two others — each with bones braced between their paws — crunch and gnaw for the rich marrow inside. The last two wolves are not visible. Presumably, they are asleep beneath nearby spruce.

The Chippewa Harbor wolf pack is feeding on their moose carcass for the third day. They’re spreading bones, blood, stomach remnants and hair over larger and larger areas every day. There seem to be enough remains to keep these wolves eating for another couple of days."
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Personalization vs Differentiation vs Individualization

Personalization vs Differentiation vs Individualization | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Here's a chart that explains the differences between personalization, differentiation, and individualization. After some research on these terms, Barbara Bray and I were able to determine the differences between these terms in relationship to teaching and learning.


Via Barbara Bray, Kathleen McClaskey, David Truss
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Barbara Bray's comment, January 23, 2012 2:00 PM
Thank you for your comment. Kathleen and I are looking for feedback on how educators are using this chart.
rwteam's comment, January 23, 2012 2:07 PM
I am in Wisconsin and we are part of CESA 1 NxGL. I team teach with 42 kindergarten kids and we are using personalized learning. We are working through the tangles of being able to personalize with kids who are just learning to read, write and compute. It has always been a struggle to be able to differentiate the difference between true personalized learning vs. differentiation and individualization. You have done a beautiful job of creating a chart that makes this clearer for all stakeholders. This chart will be useful for helping colleagues, administration and parents see the true definition of personalized learning and the potential that it holds.
Kathleen McClaskey's comment, January 23, 2012 4:18 PM
Hello rwteam in WI,

Thank you for your comments on this chart that Barbara and I created. We would be glad to have you share this with your colleagues in WI and elsewhere. We commend you and your teams in CESA 1 NxGL on the hard work that you are doing to make personalized learning a realty for your students.
Kathleen
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The Strange Career of Voter Suppression

The Strange Career of Voter Suppression | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"The right to vote has been extended and withdrawn throughout our history."

"Partisan skirmishing over election procedures has been going on in state legislatures across the country for several years. Republicans have called for cutbacks in early voting, an end to same-day registration, higher hurdles for ex-felons, the presentation of proof-of-citizenship documents and regulations discouraging registration drives. The centerpiece of this effort has been a national campaign to require voters to present particular photo ID documents at the polls. Characterized as innocuous reforms to preserve election integrity, beefed-up ID requirements have passed in more than a dozen states since 2005 and are still being considered in more than 20 others.

Opponents of the laws, mostly Democrats, claim that they are intended to reduce the participation of the young, of the poor and of minorities, who are most likely to lack government-issued IDs — and also most likely to vote Democratic.

Conflict over exercising the right to vote has been a longstanding theme in our history. The overarching trend, which we celebrate, has been greater inclusion: property requirements were dropped; racial barriers were formally eliminated; women were enfranchised."
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Mooresville School District, a Laptop Success Story

Mooresville School District, a Laptop Success Story | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"A North Carolina school district has quietly emerged as a model digital school, with thousands of laptops issued to students and test scores up across the board."

"As debate continues over whether schools invest wisely in technology — and whether it measurably improves student achievement — Mooresville, a modest community about 20 miles north of Charlotte best known as home to several Nascar teams and drivers, has quietly emerged as the de facto national model of the digital school.

Mr. Edwards spoke on a White House panel in September, and federal Department of Education officials often cite Mooresville as a symbolic success. Overwhelmed by requests to view the programs in action, the district now herds visitors into groups of 60 for monthly demonstrations; the waiting list stretches to April. What they are looking for is an explanation for the steady gains Mooresville has made since issuing laptops three years ago to the 4,400 4th through 12th graders in five schools (three K-3 schools are not part of the program).

The district’s graduation rate was 91 percent in 2011, up from 80 percent in 2008. On state tests in reading, math and science, an average of 88 percent of students across grades and subjects met proficiency standards, compared with 73 percent three years ago. Attendance is up, dropouts are down. Mooresville ranks 100th out of 115 districts in North Carolina in terms of dollars spent per student — $7,415.89 a year — but it is now third in test scores and second in graduation rates."
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Stanford Professors Daphne Koller & Andrew Ng Also Launching a Massive Online Learning Startup

"Much of the vision of Coursera echoes what Thrun said on stage at the DML conference when he unveiled his plans for Udacity: for too long, access to a world-class education has been available to only a select few. 'We see a future where world-leading educators are at the center of the education conversation,' says Coursera, 'and their reach is limitless, bounded only by the curiosity of those who seek their knowledge; where universities such as Stanford, Harvard, and Yale serve millions instead of thousands. In this future, ours will be the platform where the online conversation between educators and students will take place, and where students go to for most of their academic needs.'"

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What's a Science Teacher to Do?

A look at the issues confronting teachers trying to explore climate science amid heated public debate.
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Introducing the Inquiry Hub

A new inquiry-based school coming to School District #43 Coquitlam, BC, Canada.
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The Ultimate Brain Quest

The Ultimate Brain Quest | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Daniel J. Levitin reviews Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are by Sebastian Seung.

"'Every day we recall the past, perceive the present and imagine the future. How do our brains accomplish these feats? It's safe to say that nobody really knows,' Sebastian Seung writes early in "Connectome," his exploration of how researchers have at least made a start toward understanding how those feats are accomplished. Mr. Seung, a professor of brain science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is an amiable guide, witty and exceptionally clear in describing complex matters for the general reader.

He begins with the observation that each of us is unique, differing from one another in uncountable ways. These differences arise in part because we have different genes that influence brain development and, accordingly, behavior. Also important are gene-by-environment interactions and gene expression: You might have a genetic predisposition toward alcoholism, but without the right environmental triggers, that gene may never become active. The sequencing of the human genome has provided a map of our 20,000 genes, and we are gradually gaining insights into what these genes do, individually and in combination."
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NCIS Video - Celebrate the 200th Episode - Tuesday, February 7

NCIS Video - Celebrate the 200th Episode - Tuesday, February 7 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
The cast of NCIS chat about the NCIS 200 episode airing Tuesday, Feb. 7 at 8 PM ET/PT on CBS!
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A Modern Measurement of the Radius of the Earth

A Modern Measurement of the Radius of the Earth | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"A long time ago, but on this planet, a Greek philosopher created an experiment to measure the radius of the Earth."

"The Modern Way

You might think the modern way to measure the radius of the Earth is to just look it up. Not so fast. Really, the fun isn’t in knowing the answer; the fun is in getting the answer. So, using modern technology we essentially repeat the Greek experiment. Here is what we will do.

- On the same day, make a time-lapse video of a shadow due to the sun at two different locations (in this case Hammond, Louisiana, and Niskayuna, New York).
- From the video, you can find both the local noon time as well as the highest angle of the sun (from the shortest part of the shadow).
- The difference in angles at the two locations along with the distance between the two locations gives enough to find the radius.
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Full Show: How Big Banks are Rewriting the Rules of our Economy | BillMoyers.com

Full Show: How Big Banks are Rewriting the Rules of our Economy | BillMoyers.com | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Big banks are rewriting the rules of our economy to the exclusive benefit of their own bottom line. But how did our political and financial class shift the benefits of the economy to the very top, while saddling us with greater debt and tearing new holes in the safety net? Bill Moyers talks with former Citigroup Chairman John Reed and former Senator Byron Dorgan to explore a momentous instance: how the late-90’s merger of Citicorp and Travelers Group – and a friendly Presidential pen — brought down the Glass-Steagall Act, a crucial firewall between banks and investment firms which had protected consumers from financial calamity since the aftermath of the Great Depression. In effect, says Moyers, they “put the watchdog to sleep.”

There’s no clearer example of the collusion between government and corporate finance than the Citicorp-Travelers merger, which — thanks to the removal of Glass-Steagall — enabled the formation of the financial behemoth known as Citigroup. But even behemoths are vulnerable; when the meltdown hit, the bank cut more than 50,000 jobs, and the taxpayers shelled out more than $45 billion to save it.

Senator Dorgan tells Moyers, “If you were to rank big mistakes in the history of this country, that was one of the bigger ones because it has set back this country in a very significant way.”

Now, John Reed regrets his role in the affair, and says lifting the Glass-Steagall protections was a mistake. Given the 2008 meltdown, he’s surprised Wall Street still has so much power over Washington lawmakers.

“I’m quite surprised the political establishment would listen to groups that have been so discredited,” Reed tells Moyers. “It wasn’t that there was one or two or institutions that, you know, got carried away and did stupid things. It was, we all did…. And then the whole system came down.”

How Wall Street and Washington got together and stacked the deck against the rest of us. Watch it here."
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