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7 Things You Should Let Go Of To Become A Happier Teacher

7 Things You Should Let Go Of To Become A Happier Teacher | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"It’s that time of year when we reflect on our classes this year, and often wonder how we can become a better teacher and yet at the same time, maybe we should also ask ourselves how we can become a happier teacher. So, without further ado: 7 things you can do to become a happier teacher and please add YOURS in the comments."
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Brad Patterson's comment, July 3, 2012 7:00 AM
Thanks for the share, Dennis!
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Five Key TED Talks

Five Key TED Talks | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"In 1833, Ralph Waldo Emerson, a New England pastor who’d recently given up the ministry, delivered his first public lecture in America. The talk was held in Boston, and its nebulous-sounding subject (“The Uses of Natural History,” a title that conceals its greatness well) helped lay the groundwork for the nineteenth-century philosophy of transcendentalism. It also changed Emerson’s life. In a world that regarded higher thought largely as a staid pursuit, Emerson was a vivid, entertaining speaker—he lived for laughter or spontaneous applause—and his talk that day marked the beginning of a long career behind the podium. Over the next year, he delivered seven talks, Robert D. Richardson, Jr., tells us in his 1996 biography, “Emerson: The Mind on Fire.” By 1838, he was up to thirty. Then his career exploded. In the early eighteen-fifties, Emerson was giving as many as eighty lectures a year, and his reputation reached beyond the tight paddock of intellectual New England. The lecture circuit may not have shaped Emerson’s style of thinking, but it made that style a compass point of nineteenth-century American thought.

Whether Emerson has a modern heir remains an open question, but, more than a century after his death, the speaking trade he enjoyed continues to thrive. In this week’s issue of the magazine, I write about TED, a constellation of conferences whose style and substance has helped color our own moment in public intellectual life. As many media companies trading in “ideas” are struggling to stay afloat, TED has created a product that’s sophisticated, popular, lucrative, socially conscious, and wildly pervasive—the Holy Grail of digital-age production. The conference serves a king-making function, turning obscure academics and little-known entrepreneurs into global stars. And, though it’s earned a lot of criticism (as I explain in the article, some thinkers find TED to be narrow and dangerously slick), its “TED Talks” series of Web videos, which so far has racked up more than eight hundred million views, puts even Emerson to shame."
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Revolutionary Theory - Paradigm Shift

Revolutionary Theory - Paradigm Shift | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Fifty years ago this year, a theoretical physicist turned historian and philosopher named Thomas Kuhn published a book called The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, in which he defended a novel view of how science progresses. By most standards, the book’s influence was enormous, and its place in the non-fiction canon has been well-secured. Within the two decades following its publication, Kuhn’s work came to be cited more than any of the classic works by Freud, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, Foucault, and Derrida. Kuhn’s famous phrase “paradigm shift” would start to be bandied about by everyone from scientists who admired its characterization of their discipline to business executives who saw in its conceptual framework a model of progress in their own work to impressionable humanities majors who encountered the book as support for general skepticism about science’s claim to objective truth. On the face of it, it is more than a little surprising that an academic work of history and philosophy of science could have had so seismic an effect not only within its own field but on discourse throughout and beyond academia. The reasons for its profound resonance, and for its lasting imprint not only on how scientists and non-scientists alike understand scientific methodology but on the way we understand intellectual inquiry as a whole, merit some analysis."
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Sharing My Reading Life

Sharing My Reading Life | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"After my first year of logging [the] books [I read each month], I didn’t feel it was enough to model and share my reading with my teachers. In December of 2011, I read The Book Whisperer by Donalyn Miller, which is a MUST read if you have anything to do with teaching literacy. One of the studies she sited in this book found a link between the reading habits of teachers and the reading achievement of their students (Lundberg and Linnakyla, 1993). The take-away from this study is that if we want our students to read and enjoy it for the rest of their lives, then we must show them what a reading life looks like. I decided to take this one step further and do a better job of modeling reading for my teachers. I was already maintaining a staff blog for a weekly memo, so I decided the best avenue would be to start logging my books onto shelfari and then add a widget to my blog so that staff could easily see what I’m reading (you can see my shelfari bookshelf widget on this blog to the right as well). Since doing this, it seems like most of my teachers are reading more–both professionally and for pleasure. It could be that they were reading this much before and it just got them talking about their reading more? Even if that is so, I know that the discussions and book recommendations help build our learning community…impacting our staff and students."
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5 Great Free Collaborative Whiteboard Apps For iPad

5 Great Free Collaborative Whiteboard Apps For iPad | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Collaborative Whiteboards are gaining more and more ground within our classrooms and if you are lucky enough to have one then you might be enjoying the interactive teaching many teachers elsewhere miss. These collaborative Whiteboards are great for holding students attention and getting them foucsed on their learning. They are also useful when trying to explain to students hard-to-grasp concepts. Now with the advance of mobile technology, you can even turn these Whiteboards into better learning tools with manny iPad apps allowing you to record whatever you are explaining and share your screen with a wider audience in real time. Using such apps can make your students learning way enjoyable then it ever used to be.

Check out this list of some of the best free collaborative Whiteboard iPad apps."
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What I've Learned About Learning

What I've Learned About Learning | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"I'm [Leo Babauta] a lifelong learner and am always obsessively studying something, whether that's breadmaking or language or wine or chess or writing or fitness."

"I am a teacher and an avid learner, and I’m passionate about both.

I’m a teacher because I help Eva homeschool our kids — OK, she does most of the work, but I do help, mostly with math but with everything else too. I also teach habits, writing/blogging, simplicity and other fun topics in online courses.

I’m a lifelong learner and am always obsessively studying something, whether that’s breadmaking or language or wine or chess or writing or fitness.

Here’s are two key lessons — both really the same lesson — I’ve learned about learning, in all my years of study and in trying to teach people:

- Almost everything I’ve learned, I didn’t learn in school; and

- Almost everything my students (and kids) have learned, they learned on their own.

Those two lessons (or one lesson) have a number of reasons and implications for learning. Let’s take a look at some of them, in hopes you might find them useful."
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The Shark Tank Formula: 4 Steps To Owning A Room--And Making A Killing

The Shark Tank Formula: 4 Steps To Owning A Room--And Making A Killing | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"How five filthy-rich entrepreneurs caught the attention of business owners everywhere to become a Friday night ritual that rivals the best business schools."

"Unleashing Your Brand's Inner Shark: The 4 Lethal Traits
How to be a shark? How to 'see the outcome' and have that tenacity? Looking at the traits that make this show so interesting to watch, there are a few stand out qualities.

In a normal post, I would call these sound bites. In this case, it's only appropriate to call these shark bites.

1. Foster Certainty

None of the sharks are ambiguous. They love you. Or hate you. They know how, and when, they can help. They know when they can't. That's called integrity, my friend (as O'Leary likes to tag "my friend" onto his words of sage-like advice to those standing before the hungry sharks, even when he's telling you to burn what you just brought in).

Shark Bite:
Has your brand taken a stand? Besides knowing what your brand says yes about, does your brand also know what it says "no" to?
"

For three more traits, go here: http://goo.gl/f2KeC
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In Health Care Ruling, A Pyrrhic Victory

In Health Care Ruling, A Pyrrhic Victory | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"By opening up new avenues for the courts to rewrite the law, the federal government may have won the battle but lost the war."

"The health care decision also contains the seeds for a potential restructuring of federal-state relations. For example, until now, it had been understood that when the federal government gave money to a state in exchange for the state’s doing something, the federal government was free to do so as long as a reasonable relationship existed between the federal funds and the act the federal government wanted the state to perform.

In potentially ominous language, the decision says, for the first time, that such a threat is coercive and that the states cannot be penalized for not expanding their Medicaid coverage after receiving funds. And it does so in the context of Medicaid, which Congress created and can alter, amend or abolish at any time. The states knew the terms of the deal when they joined — and those terms continue to be enshrined in the federal code.

This was the first significant loss for the federal government’s spending power in decades. The fancy footwork that the court employed to view the act as coercive could come back in later cases to haunt the federal government. Many programs are built on the government’s spending power, and the existence of an extraconstitutional limit on that power is a worrisome development."
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No Comment Necessary: Texas GOP's 2012 Platform Opposes Teaching "Critical Thinking Skills"

"The Republican Party of Texas's 2012 platform has a plank on 'Knowledge-Based Education' that reads:

'We oppose the teaching of Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) (values clarification), critical thinking skills and similar programs that are simply a relabeling of Outcome-Based Education (OBE) (mastery learning) which focus on behavior modification and have the purpose of challenging the student's fixed beliefs and undermining parental authority.'"
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SCOTUS Update: La Loi, C'est Moi

SCOTUS Update: La Loi, C'est Moi | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"I am not enough of a Supreme Court buff to have any confident idea of what the majority will rule on the Obama health care plan.

 

But confidence in the very idea that the Roberts majority will approach this as a "normal" legal matter, rather than as one more Bush v. Gore front in the political wars, grows ever harder to maintain, especially after the latest labor-rights ruling. It is worth reading carefully this lead editorial in yesterday's New York Times. In short, the same five conservative Justices who in their pre-appointment phase had inveighed against "judicial activism" and "legislating from the bench," while promising to live the gospel of judicial "humility" if confirmed, went out of their way, in a ruling written by Samuel Alito, to decree new law contrary to what Congress had ordered and other courts had long approved.*

 

Normally I shy away from apocalyptic readings of the American predicament. We're a big, messy country; we've been through a lot -- perhaps even more than we thought, what with Abraham Lincoln and the vampires. We'll probably muddle through this and be very worried about something else ten years from now. But when you look at the sequence from Bush v. Gore, through Citizens United, to what seems to be coming on the health-care front; and you combine it with ongoing efforts in Florida and elsewhere to prevent voting from presumably Democratic blocs; and add that to the simply unprecedented abuse of the filibuster in the years since the Democrats won control of the Senate and then took the White House, you have what we'd identify as a kind of long-term coup if we saw it happening anywhere else.**"

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Gigapixel Camera Snaps Sharp Pics

Gigapixel Camera Snaps Sharp Pics | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"A gigapixel camera capable of creating images with "unprecedented detail" is developed in the US and could eventually become a consumer product."

"Most consumer cameras currently on the market are capable of taking photographs ranging from eight to 40 megapixels.

Pixels are basically individual "dots" of data - and the higher the number of pixels, the better resolution of the image.

The researchers believe that within five years, as the electronic components of the cameras become miniaturised and more efficient, the next generation of gigapixel cameras should be available to the general public."
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Why Crowded Coffee Shops Fire Up Your Creativity

"RESULTS: Compared to a relatively quiet environment (50 decibels), a moderate level of ambient noise (70 dB) enhanced subjects' performance on the creativity tasks, while a high level of noise (85 dB) hurt it. Modest background noise, the scientists explain, creates enough of a distraction to encourage people to think more imaginatively."
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A Beekeeper's Perspective on Risk

A Beekeeper's Perspective on Risk | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"A decade ago, I embarked on a new hobby — one that many more people have taken up in the meantime. I became a beekeeper. At the same time, I became a bee observer. Like Sherlock Holmes (in His Last Bow), I spent many pensive nights and laborious days watching the little working gangs.

What I didn't expect was to learn lessons about organizational strategy and behavior that would inform my work as a human capital consultant. Professionally, I help large businesses manage risk by focusing on how their recruiting, compensation, training, and other systems encourage people to behave. What I came to recognize was that beehives were organizations that naturally got things right. The honeybee colonies I was cultivating were structured for consistent long-term growth and the prevention of severe loss due to unpredictable environmental surprises. Bees are masters at risk management.
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14 Smart Tips For Using iPads In Class

14 Smart Tips For Using iPads In Class | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"For schools that are about to deploy the iPad as their main mobile learning device, there’s wisdom to be learned from others who’ve gone down that road. At Marin Country Day School in Corte Madera, Calif., the first year of a pilot iPad program for sixth-graders has just ended, and some clear lessons have emerged. Here are some tips to help smooth the transition.

1. START CLASS WITH GOOD HABITS. Start out the day with a learning challenge like Google a Day to get students using and searching the iPad in a productive manner, instead of coming in to homeroom, advisory, or classroom and going into their own applications or searches."
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Graphing The History Of Philosophy

Graphing The History Of Philosophy | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"This one came about because I was searching for a data set on horror films (don’t ask) and ended up with one describing the links between philosophers.

To cut a long story very short I’ve extracted the information in the influenced by section for every philosopher on Wikipedia and used it to construct a network which I’ve then visualised using gephi

It’s an easy process to repeat. It could be done for any area within Wikipedia where the information forms a network. I chose philosophy because firstly the influences section is very well maintained and secondly I know a little bit about it. At the bottom of this post I’ve described how I got there.
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9 Signs That Neuroscience Has Entered The Classroom

9 Signs That Neuroscience Has Entered The Classroom | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"There is often a big divide between what happens in the laboratory and the way laboratory findings are practically applied. The relationship between neuroscience research and education is no exception. While there are numerous educational products that claim to be based on neuroscience research (often quite dubiously so), the real impact of brain-based research on education has been much more subtle. While neuroscience hasn’t yet radically changed the way we think about teaching and learning, it is helping to shape educational policies and influencing new ways of implementing technology, improving special education, and streamlining day-to-day interactions between teachers and students. While there is still a long way to go before we truly understand the science of learning and how to use those findings in the real world classroom, it’s important to highlight some of the key ways that neuroscience is changing the classroom of today for the better."
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A History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in 100 Riffs

A History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in 100 Riffs | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Give the talented Alex Chadwick 12 minutes, and he’ll give you A Brief History of Rock ‘n’ Roll, with each defining moment represented by a famous guitar riff. Our journey starts in 1953, with “Mr. Sandman” by Chet Atkins. Pretty soon, and quite seamlessly, we get to The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, Hendrix and Led Zeppelin, Queen and The Ramones, and eventually some more contemporary pairings – Green Day and White Stripes. The video is sponsored by the Chicago Music Exchange, a store specializing in vintage gear, like the $32,995 1958 Fender Strat played in the clip. A full list of riffs appears below the jump."
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Using Technology With Gifted Students

"... the dramatically increasing rate of technology use in the classroom has the potential to help teachers more effectively meet the needs of gifted students without sacrificing their efforts to help other students. Here are four key ways technology–particularly 1:1 technology–can be used to meet the needs of gifted learners of all ages."
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Nick Clegg Launches School Careers Talk Volunteer Scheme

Nick Clegg Launches School Careers Talk Volunteer Scheme | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Research for the Education and Employers Taskforce, a charity running the scheme, suggests pupils who have contact with employers at school will go on to earn 16% more on average than pupils who do not have the same opportunities.

Clegg said: 'Too many young people get the message that the best jobs are not for them. Inspiring the Future will give state school students the chance to see, hear and make a connection with someone in a career or job they might not have thought about.

'Today we're calling on doctors, nurses, lawyers, builders, businesspeople, civil servants, farmers, mechanics, engineers and other working people to give up just an hour of their time to talk to students in their local state school about how they got where they are today. The power of making connections that inspire young people is immeasurable and can be life-changing.'

Volunteers and schools can register at inspiringthefuture.org. Organisers aim to recruit 100,000 volunteers."
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Infographic: Exposing Your Startup’s True Colors

"Using the wrong colors for your brand might turn customers away, according to this infographic. As such, picking the right color is of great importance not just to how people perceive your brand. It also impacts your bottom line. Another interesting tidbit: Red and blue are apparently the most popular colors among the world’s top 100 brands."
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Links Gathered At ISTE 2012 - YU eLearning

Links Gathered At ISTE 2012 - YU eLearning | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Below are links to sites that I [Eliezer Jones] came across at the recent ISTE 2012 conference I attended. Some of these sites I was familiar with, but most were new.
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NMC, CoSN, And ISTE Release The K-12 Horizon Report Toolkit at ISTE 2012

NMC, CoSN, And ISTE Release The K-12 Horizon Report Toolkit at ISTE 2012 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"The New Media Consortium (NMC), the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN), and the International Society for Technology in Education have released the NMC Horizon Report > 2012 K-12 Edition and are releasing the accompanying CoSN Horizon Report: 2012 K-12 Edition Toolkit in a special session at the ISTE 2012 Conference.

The annual K-12-focused research project generates considerable interest every year when it is released and has built a global following. At the ISTE conference this year in San Diego, the three principal investigators behind the report — NMC CEO Larry Johnson, CoSN CEO Keith R. Krueger, and ISTE Deputy CEO Leslie Conery — are discussing the Report, the Toolkit, and their impact in a landmark session.

This fourth annual edition of the report examines emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in teaching, learning, and creative expression within the environment of primary and secondary education. Education and technology leaders, policymakers, and key stakeholders in educational institutions need practical, forward-thinking information that addresses opportunities for teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. The NMC Horizon Report > 2012 K-12 Edition provides a rich set of topics, examples, and resources for use when considering new technologies or engaging in strategic planning.

'Educators, administrators, and practitioners across the world use the report as a springboard for discussion around emerging technology,' noted Johnson, founder of the NMC Horizon Project. 'As this is the tenth year of the NMC Horizon Project and the fourth year of the K-12 series, this report also offers an opportunity to think how some of these technologies have unfolded over time. What we see is that there continue to be long-term channels along which educational technology is evolving. These have affected, are affecting now, and will continue to affect the practice of teaching and learning in profound ways for some time.'"
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The Education System That Pulled China Up May Now Be Holding it Back

The Education System That Pulled China Up May Now Be Holding it Back | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"China wants inventors and entrepreneurs, but its schools, built around the notorious gaokao exam, are still designed to produce cookie-cutter engineers and accountants."

 

"Students with ideas that deviate from the official orthodoxy often seem to struggle in China's education system, as do students whose pursuits differ from the system's rigidly defined standards for talent and success. Most students are required to take the same classes regardless of their talents or interests. Their achievement is measured solely by their scores in gaokao, and hobbies not convertible into gaokao points are deemed distractions. Why play soccer or take part in the student council, after all, if it leaves less time for cracking chemistry problems? You live and die by your numbers, starting with your gaokao score, a value system that is reinforced by employers and families alike. Many people in China know and even venerate the stories of Bill Gates and Steve Jobs dropping out of college to start their own businesses. But when I told Chinese friends that a college classmate was taking a gap year to do mountaineering, they responded with baffled looks.

 

Whatever your formula for innovation -- diversity of thought, collaboration, risk-taking -- you're not likely to find it in abundance in Chinese schools, where high-stake tests pit students against one other in a zero-sum competition that can feel a little more Hunger Games than think tank. "[When] you feel that the guy sitting beside you is your potential enemy who may rob you of a lifetime of happiness, altruism is not going to be your guide," gaokao veteran Eric Mu wrote in an essay on Danwei titled, "Confessions of a Chinese Graduate." If you find a question you can't answer you certainly don't ask a classmate for help, Mu explained, because "[to] offer your knowledge or even your questions for free is not only time consuming but an aid to your enemies." Students whose unsatisfactory test scores lower their class's average often become social outcasts, as do the students who make everyone else toss in their sleep by working just a little too hard. Teachers and headmasters, whose reputations and salaries are tied to their students' exam scores, have more of an interest in maintaining a good average than in, say, dedicating extra time to a struggling student.

 

China needs a generation of entrepreneurs to develop a more innovative economy, its national leaders know, but a recent report found that only 1.6 percent of Chinese college graduates started businesses last year, the same as the year before. Opening up local e-commerce stores or restaurants is great, but it's nothing yet on the scale of a Chinese Apple or a Chinese Facebook. The nation's high-profile entrepreneurs, such as Pan Shiyi and Zhang Lan, are worshipped by young, middle class Chinese. But these business megastars are largely perceived as distant celebrities, rather than as role models who should -- and can -- be emulated."

 

via Rob Ackerman

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Let’s End The Paradox Of Kindness

"Employees complain in engagement surveys that their bosses don’t treat them with respect or as unique individuals. Yet on the flip side, research shows that bosses who treat people with kindness, respect and dignity are 'seen as less powerful than other managers.'

What a dreadful paradox: We want to be treated with kindness yet don’t respect those who do so. What’s up with this?

In the workplace, kindness — being friendly, generous and considerate — is often dismissed as a weakness because of the negative stereotypes that cling to it: pushover, sucker, patsy or nice guy (or gal) who finishes last. Kindness isn’t typically rewarded at review time, given that most business performance is evaluated on what’s done rather than how it’s done."
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8 Resources For Preventing And Detecting Plagiarism

"This morning in a workshop that I [Richard Byrne] facilitated with Greg Kulowiec there was a great discussion about copyright, Creative Commons, and fair use as it relates to using media in iBooks Author. During that conversation, Common Craft's explanation of Creative Commons was helpful. Later in the day I had a conversation with a couple of teachers who were also concerned about students plagiarizing work when constructing iBooks. That conversation prompted me to dig up some resources fore teaching students what plagiarism is, how to avoid it, and how to detect it."
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