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Despite Less Play, Children's Use Of Imagination Increases Over Two Decades

Despite Less Play, Children's Use Of Imagination Increases Over Two Decades | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Children today may be busier than ever, but Case Western Reserve University psychologists have found that their imagination hasn't suffered -- in fact, it appears to have increased.

 

Psychologists Jessica Dillon and Sandra Russ expected the opposite outcome when they analyzed 14 play studies that Russ conducted between 1985 and 2008.

 

But as they report in 'Changes in Children's Play Over Two Decades,' an article in the Creativity Research Journal, the data told a story contrary to common assumptions. First, children's use of imagination in play and their overall comfort and engagement with play activities actually increased over time. In addition, the results suggested that children today expressed less negative feelings in play. Finally, their capacity to express a wide range of positive emotions, to tell stories and to organize thoughts stayed consistent."

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Calling School Librarians to Action! Another Attempt to Undermine Our Jobs

Calling School Librarians to Action!  Another Attempt to Undermine Our Jobs | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"My blood is boiling. I read this article online today after it was shared on Twitter by Rebecca Oxley (@LibrariansFTW). This excerpt is what got my dander up. And that is a dangerous thing to do with a Southern gal:

 

'The new divide is such a cause of concern for the Federal Communications Commission that it is considering a proposal to spend $200 million to create a digital literacy corps. This group of hundreds, even thousands, of trainers would fan out to schools and libraries to teach productive uses of computers for parents, students and job seekers.'

 

Looks like the FCC has no idea that our schools have a ready-made “digital literacy corps” in place."

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New ‘Digital Divide’ Seen In Wasting Time Online

New ‘Digital Divide’ Seen In Wasting Time Online | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"As access to devices has spread, children in poorer families are spending considerably more time using them for purposes other than for education."

"The new divide is such a cause of concern for the Federal Communications Commission that it is considering a proposal to spend $200 million to create a digital literacy corps. This group of hundreds, even thousands, of trainers would fan out to schools and libraries to teach productive uses of computers for parents, students and job seekers.

Separately, the commission will help send digital literacy trainers this fall to organizations like the Boys and Girls Club, the League of United Latin American Citizens, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Some of the financial support for this program, part of a broader initiative called Connect2Compete, comes from private companies like Best Buy and Microsoft.

These efforts complement a handful of private and state projects aimed at paying for digital trainers to teach everything from basic keyboard use and word processing to how to apply for jobs online or use filters to block children from seeing online pornography.

'Digital literacy is so important,' said Julius Genachowski, chairman of the commission, adding that bridging the digital divide now also means “giving parents and students the tools and know-how to use technology for education and job-skills training.'”
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7 Great Note-taking Tools For Teachers and Students

7 Great Note-taking Tools For Teachers and Students | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"This is another post that was prompted by a reader’s email. The email was looking for a list of recommended note-taking tools. I’ve reviewed a lot of note-taking tools over the last five years, but I have never made a list. So here’s my list of seven great note-taking tools for students and teachers."
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Paul Simon Takes Us Back

"A must-see documentary on the making of Simon’s classic “Graceland” album in South Africa in 1985 is a story about when art confronted politics."

"Recalling their world tour with Simon after Graceland became a hit, saxophonist Barney Rachabane remarks: 'In South Africa, we had no opportunity. We could only play in the townships. We couldn’t play in town in the beautiful nightclubs. You could have dreams, but they [could] never come true. It really destroys you. But Graceland opened my eyes and set a tone of hope in my life.'

Added guitarist, John Selolwane, 'I remember when we were on tour and especially in Europe during the winter times. Every time Black Mambazo went on that stage and started singing, I would feel tears coming. I’m like, ‘Here I am. I’m an African boy. I’m in the middle of the snow and ... there are 50,000 people filled up in the stadium,’ and I would be crying. I’m like, ‘Damn, we are really seeing the world.’ ”
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Announcing “Teachers Write!” A Virtual Summer Writing Camp for Teachers & Librarians

Announcing “Teachers Write!” A Virtual Summer Writing Camp for Teachers & Librarians | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Teachers Write! is an online virtual summer writing camp for teachers and librarians who understand how important it is for people teaching writing to walk the walk. If you’re a teacher or librarian who would love to work on your own writing, we’d love to have you join us.

 

Here’s how it all works:

 

Location: www.katemessner.com/blog (Post Category: TeachersWrite) New posts will be shared each weekday morning, and you can check in whenever it’s convenient.

 

Dates: June 4th- August 10th

 

Schedule: ....."

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10th Grade Chemistry Project Becomes A Viral Video

10th Grade Chemistry Project Becomes A Viral Video | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"A student's tuneful 10th grade chemistry class project has become a viral video."

 

"Give this kid an “A.” Eli Cirino, a 16-year-old high school student submitted the video above for extra credit for his 10th grade chemistry class. The reaction is probably far beyond what he expected.


The They Might Be Giants-like “Good Chemistry” explains chemical bonds via a boy-girl love story, which Cirino wrote, performed and filmed. The animation was created using construction paper. The video got a boost when Cirino’s father submitted it on Reddit. Tuesday morning, it was up to 250,000 views on YouTube.

 

The video’s so catchy that it might be churlish to point out — as many on Reddit did — that the melody seems to borrow a bit from Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah” a bit. On the other hand, some Redditors gave Cirino props for making the video 'pi length' — 3 minutes and 14 seconds long."

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The Educator’s Guide To Instagram And Other Photo Apps

"I’m not the most dedicated Instagrammer (need to get out more) or the best photographer (wish I was) but like many other educators, I enjoy sharing my photos on Instagram.

Why? It’s fun! Easy! I can quickly share photos taken on my iPhone when I’m out and about! Or have fun editing photos and sharing from my camera on my iPad! And in the process I’m learning more about photography, photo editing and other Instagram users.

Here’s my advice to help you get started or get more out of using Instagram."
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Create stuff... today!

Create stuff... today! | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"YOU CAN DO IT...


'If I [Frederic Terral] can do it, so can you.' That’s what I’ve been preaching to friends and colleagues since I started this terrain. Late nights, early mornings and sacrificed weekends is what it takes, but the rewards offset the inconveniences. So many of these crazy talented folks are dissatisfied with their professional lives so I wrote The Manifesto to be that annoying 'you can do it' voice in the background. The Manifesto also gets a bit preachy about the sacrifice of the arts in our schools, because as a father of little ones I want them to master their A-B-Cs and 1-2-3s AND their Red-Green-Blues and E-A-D-G-B-Es. This page also features links to right brain propaganda and right-brainers I revere. The links will continue to evolve indefinitely so check back periodically."

 

Via BrainPickings.org

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The Cult of Done Manifesto

The Cult of Done Manifesto | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
1. There are three states of being. Not knowing, action and completion.
2. Accept that everything is a draft. It helps to get it done.
3. There is no editing stage.
4. Pretending you know what you're doing is almost the same as knowing what you are doing, so just accept that you know what you're doing even if you don't and do it.
5. Banish procrastination. If you wait more than a week to get an idea done, abandon it.
6. The point of being done is not to finish but to get other things done.
7. Once you're done you can throw it away.
8. Laugh at perfection. It's boring and keeps you from being done.
9. People without dirty hands are wrong. Doing something makes you right.
10. Failure counts as done. So do mistakes.
11. Destruction is a variant of done.
12. If you have an idea and publish it on the internet, that counts as a ghost of done.
13. Done is the engine of more.

Via BrainPickings.org
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Bryan Magee’s In-Depth, Uncut TV Conversations With Famous Philosophers (1978-87)

Bryan Magee’s In-Depth, Uncut TV Conversations With Famous Philosophers (1978-87) | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Bryan Magee comes from a tradition that produced some of the twentieth century’s most impressive media personalities: that of the scholarship-educated, Oxbridge-refined, intellectually omnivorous, occasionally office-holding, radio- and television-savvy man of letters. Students and professors of philosophy probably know him from his large print oeuvre, which includes volumes on Popper and Schopenhauer as well as several guides to western philosophy and the autobiographical Confessions of a Philosopher. He also wrote another memoir called The Television Interviewer, and philosophically inclined laymen may fondly remember him as just that. When Magee played to both these strengths at once, he came up with two philosophical television shows in the span of a decade: Men of Ideas, which began in 1978, and The Great Philosophers, which ran in 1987. Both series brought BBC viewers in-depth, uncut conversations with many of the day’s most famous philosophers."
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True size of Africa

True size of Africa | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Online maps that we use for directions use the Mercator projection, and this tends to dictate how we perceive the size of countries and continents. If you look at the world map on Google, for example, Africa doesn't look that much bigger compared to China or the United States. In reality though, it's a lot bigger. Kai Krause scales countries by their area in square kilometers and then fits them into a Africa's borders for some perspective."

Via Mark Richardson
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On the Allure Of Ostriches And New Paths In Climate Communication

On the Allure Of Ostriches And New Paths In Climate Communication | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"The study, published last November in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, substantiates that when confronted with a distressing and complex issue that they know very little about, such as climate change, people are motivated to avoid learning more about it. Shepard and Kay, the authors of his paper call this 'motivated avoidance.' Their article explains how an 'ignorance is bliss' philosophy may thwart important social information from penetrating the minds of the public.

 

So, if current educational strategies turn people off and motivate them to defer to government authorities or scientists to make decisions rather than trusting themselves to think critically or to change the world, how do we teach about troubling topics? A key to teaching youth about climate change is to teach critical thinking and to teach youth to take action on what they have learned.

 

The ability of a person to believe in their power to make change in their own life and in the world at large is called self-efficacy. In his book 'Self Efficacy: The Exercise of Control,' Albert Bandura of Stanford University’s Department of Psychology documents “efficacy beliefs” in people’s lives and how they affect personal and social change. 'Efficacy beliefs shape the outcomes people expect their efforts to produce… 'People of low self-efficacy are easily convinced of the futility of effort in the face of impediments. Those of high self- efficacy view impediments as surmountable through perseverance.'"

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A List of Interesting Mobile Learning Links

A List of Interesting Mobile Learning Links | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Mobile learning is in the air, almost everyone realizes the potential, and some companies are now taking tentative first steps.


While I [Abhijit Kadle] haven’t blogged in a while, I continue trawling through my RSS feeds, seeing more and more references to mobile learning, mlearning, performance support, ‘just-in-time’ and so many other terms that make sense in that context.


Here are some interesting links I’ve come across recently, mostly about mobile learning and some about learning in general that I found interesting. Do note some of these link up to dated articles."

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Sal Khan's 'Academy' Sparks A Tech Revolution In Education

Sal Khan's 'Academy' Sparks A Tech Revolution In Education | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Sal Khan started Khan Academy to help teach his cousin math. Now he's using the Web to change the way we think about education."

"That bandwagon phenomenon is at the root of the grumbling, says Kevin Bushweller, executive editor of Education Week Digital Directions.

'Khan's timing is perfect, because students and parents are living in the age of YouTube, where video watching is routine,' he says. 'Certainly schools need to evaluate what's best for their kids and curriculum. That said, technology is here, and doing the same old thing just won't work.'

Suney Park agrees. The sixth-grade math teacher at Eastside College Prep in nearby East Palo Alto recently flipped her classroom using Khan Academy videos, and now feels liberated. 'I had my doubts, but now I feel like the conductor of an orchestra, and if I have to tell the violins to go on with their stuff while I help the brass catch up, I can do it,' Park says. 'I couldn't go back to the regular way of teaching.'"
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Why We Need To Teach Social Networking

Why We Need To Teach Social Networking | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"From Venturebeat.com

'The girl, 17, had been helping her grandmother count the 72-year-old woman’s personal savings. Apparently wishing to impress her friends and the world at large, the teen snapped a picture of the cash and uploaded it to Facebook.

Within hours, masked robbers showed up at the girl’s own house with a knife and a club, breaking in and stealing cash and personal possessions from the teen’s 47-year-old mother.'

'I [Jeff Utecht ] read this the other day and was wondering if this girl ever was taught about social networking and where her information goes.'"
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Flip This: Bloom’s Taxonomy Should Start With Creating

Flip This: Bloom’s Taxonomy Should Start With Creating | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"I [Shelley Wright] think the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is wrong.

I know this statement sounds heretical in the realms of education, but I think this is something we should rethink, especially since it is so widely taught to pre-service teachers. I agree that the taxonomy accurately classifies various types of cognitive thinking skills. It certainly identifies the different levels of complexity. But its organizing framework is dead wrong. Here’s why."
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10 Colleges Most Creatively Using Mobile Technology

10 Colleges Most Creatively Using Mobile Technology | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Get inspired by some of thecreative ways these schools have harnessed mobile media for current and future students."

 

"Seeing as how mobile devices and related technologies have completely overtaken a good chunk of society already, naturally the education sector has followed suit. Oddly enough, though, smartphones, social media, tablet computers, and other hallmarks of the mobile technology revolution still have yet to fully creep onto campus, with many schools somewhat puzzled over exactly what to do with the exciting new toys the kids are into these days. Others, however, saw innovation as opportunity, and went about drawing up innovative strategies for letting these digital developments enhance lessons, streamline college life, open up new possibilities, or some combination thereof. Get inspired by some of the seriously cool, creative ways the following schools have harnessed mobile media for current and future students."

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4 Innovative Student Projects That Could Change the World

4 Innovative Student Projects That Could Change the World | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Meet the four finalists of the Microsoft’s Imagine Cup, which challenges students to use technology to solve the world’s toughest problems."

 

"Microsoft’s Imagine Cup brings students together from across the world each year, in effort to use technology to solve the world’s toughest problems.

 

Mashable met with four teams, hailing from Germany, Australia, the U.S. and Qatar, to learn how they are using technology to make an impact on the future.

 

Students are using Microsoft’s Kinect for Xbox 360, Windows 8, Windows Azure and Windows Phone in their Imagine Cup projects. Many members of the competition draw inspiration from the U.N.’s Millennium Development Goals, to create solutions to problems in the fields of education, healthcare and environmental sustainability, among others.

 

The Worldwide Finals will take place in Sydney, Australia, between June 6 and 10, where the winners of local, regional and online competitions will share their visions for how technology can shape the future. The 106 teams will hail from 75 countries."

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More High School Students Are Going to College Than Ever Before

More High School Students Are Going to College Than Ever Before | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Today's high school students are taking more math and science courses and more are going straight to college after graduation than their peers from a generation ago. That's the finding of 'The Condition of Education 2012' a just-released report from the National Center of Educational Statistics, which covers all aspects of education, from preschool through through college."

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Memory Test: A History Of U.S. Citizenship Education and Examination

"Background/Context: While much has been written about the history of immigration and naturalization in the United States, few scholars have looked at the history of citizenship education and testing. The small body of literature on the subject has primarily focused on World War I-era Americanization efforts and, as such, has excluded later periods. Further, while it has looked at citizenship education programs, it has usually done so without considering the context of the high stakes exam that immigrants must pass in order to become citizens.

Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: Each year, tens of thousands of would-be American citizens set out to conquer the U.S. citizenship test. To do so, they must be prepared to answer 10 fact-oriented questions about American government, history, and geography selected by a naturalization examiner from a master list of 100. A score of six correct answers earns citizenship. Consequently, aspiring citizens memorize the number of Amendments to the Constitution, the branches of government, the names of three of the original American colonies, and the location of the Statue of Liberty. Most immigrants pass.

This article seeks to understand the roots of the memory test that currently serves as America’s gauge of fitness for citizenship. In looking back over 100 years of history, it seeks to explore how a once highly pluralistic approach to education and an anxiety-producing system of testing conducted by naturalization courts became what we know today. By asking how we got here, it also implicitly asks whether we want to maintain this status quo or seek out change."
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About – workisnotajob.

About – workisnotajob. | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Via BrainPickings.org
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Flipped Classroom: Beyond the Videos

Flipped Classroom: Beyond the Videos | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Last week, I [Catlin Tucker] read an interesting blog post by Shelley Blake-Plock titled "The Problem with TED ed." It got me thinking about the flipped classroom model and how it is being defined."

"I wish the conversation focused more on what actually happens in a flipped classroom. If we move lecture or the transfer of knowledge online to create time and space in the physical classroom, how are we using that time to improve learning for students? What is our role as the teacher in the flipped classroom? How are we maximizing the potential of the group when students are together to design collaborative, creative, student-centered activities and assignments? This is the part I want to hear more about!

For me, the beauty of the flipped classroom lies in the simple realization that instruction can take place in different mediums. We are no longer limited to a class period or a physical classroom. We have the opportunity to match the instructional activity with the environment that makes the most sense. Ramsey Musallam, defines 'flip teaching' as 'leveraging technology to appropriately pair the learning activity with the learning environment.' This flexibility is why technology has the potential to be so transformative in education."
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On Memorial Day Weekend, America Reckons With Torture | Bill Moyers

On Memorial Day Weekend, America Reckons With Torture | Bill Moyers | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Why it's important to face the truth about U.S. torture tactics as we honor Americans in uniform."

"This summer, it’s believed that the United States Senate’s intelligence committee finally will release a report on 'enhanced interrogation techniques,' that euphemistic phrase for what any reasonable person not employed by the government would call torture. The report has been three years in the making, with investigators examining millions of classified documents. The news service Reuters says the report will conclude that techniques such as waterboarding and sleep deprivation do not yield worthwhile intelligence information.

So here we are, into our eleventh year after 9/11, still at war in Afghanistan, still at war with terrorists, still at war with our collective conscience as we grapple with how to protect our country from attack without violating the basic values of civilization — the rule of law, striving to achieve our aims without corrupting them, and restraint in the use of power over others, especially when exercised in secret.

In future days and years, how will we come to cope with the reality of what we have done in the name of security?  Many other societies do seem to try harder than we do to come to terms with horrendous behavior commissioned or condoned by a government. Beginning in 1996, in South Africa, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission held hearings at which whites and blacks struggled to confront the cruelty inflicted on human beings during apartheid.

And perhaps you caught something said the other day by the president of Brazil, Dilma Roussef.  During the early 70′s, she was held in prison and tortured repeatedly by the military dictators who ruled her country for nearly 25 years. The state of Rio de Janeiro has announced it will officially apologize to her. Earlier, when she swore in members of a commission investigating the dictatorship, President Roussef said: 'We are not moved by revenge, hate or a desire to rewrite history. The need to know the full truth is what moves us.'

In other words, 'You shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free.'"
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