Learning, Teaching & Leading Today
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How Will You Measure Your Life?

One of the theories that gives great insight on the first question—how to be sure we find happiness in our careers—is from Frederick Herzberg, who asserts that the powerful motivator in our lives isn’t money; it’s the opportunity to learn, grow in responsibilities, contribute to others, and be recognized for achievements. I tell the students about a vision of sorts I had while I was running the company I founded before becoming an academic.

 

In my mind’s eye I saw one of my managers leave for work one morning with a relatively strong level of self-esteem. Then I pictured her driving home to her family 10 hours later, feeling unappreciated, frustrated, underutilized, and demeaned. I imagined how profoundly her lowered self-esteem affected the way she interacted with her children.

 

The vision in my mind then fast-forwarded to another day, when she drove home with greater self-esteem—feeling that she had learned a lot, been recognized for achieving valuable things, and played a significant role in the success of some important initiatives. I then imagined how positively that affected her as a spouse and a parent.

 

My conclusion: Management is the most noble of professions if it’s practiced well. No other occupation offers as many ways to help others learn and grow, take responsibility and be recognized for achievement, and contribute to the success of a team."

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SHARE: Playing with Media - Showcase Student Work!

SHARE: Playing with Media - Showcase Student Work! | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

If digital student work is one “fruit of our labor” as educators, this website is all about sharing digital fruit.

 

This website (share.playingwithmedia.com) is a space for sharing digital text, images, audio and video in line with the pedagogies of Wesley Fryer’s eBook, “Playing with Media: simple ideas for powerful sharing.” ALL SUBMISSIONS TO THIS SITE ARE MODERATED. Examples of student work are particularly invited, encouraged, and welcome! Personal examples of media created by individual adults (generally educators and/or parents) are also welcome. Submissions by home school students and parents are welcome along with submissions from students/educators in public as well as private schools. This is a space for safe, online digital sharing.


Remember: We have to PLAY WITH MEDIA to understand its power and potential uses to support learning! Use the navigational links at the top of the site to submit media examples as well as explore examples shared by others.

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Excerpts from "Effective Teaching as a Civil Right: How Building Instructional Capacity Can Help Close the Achievement Gap," an article by Linda Darling-Hammond

Here are some quotes from Linda Darling-Hammond's article. You can read the whole article by clicking here: http://goo.gl/Gn6TA

"...teacher knowledge and skills are closely related to teachers’ and schools’ capacity to support stu- dent learning..."

"...I believe a capacity-building approach is critically important to promote effective teach- ing in all communities, particularly those where it is currently most lacking."

"...it is important to consider both teacher quality – so that the system recruits the right people and prepares them effectively – and teaching quality – so that the most effective practices are encouraged and the most supportive conditions are provided."

"Research has found that more-effective teachers gen- erally possess high verbal ability; strong content and pedagogical knowledge; an understanding of learners and learning; an ability to design useful curriculum, engaging learning tasks, and informa- tive assessments; and an ability and willingness to reflect on and improve their own practice.1"

"Substantial evidence also points to the importance of class size, specific curriculum supports, the avail- ability of instructional supports such as tutoring, and the use of time as strong predictors of student achievement, along with factors like student attendance.2"

"In one study, economists found that most value- added gains were attributable to teachers who were more experienced and better qualified, and who stay together as teams within their schools. The researchers found that peer learn- ing among small groups of teachers was the most powerful predictor of improved student achievement over time (Jackson & Bruegmann 2009)."

"Dramatic inequalities in access to certified teachers have been docu- mented in lawsuits challenging school funding in California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, and Texas, among other states (Darling- Hammond 2010b)."

"In reading, for example, the negative effect on upper elementary students taught by underprepared novices has been estimated as the loss of about one-third of a grade level each year (Laczko-Kerr & Berliner 2002; Darling-Hammond
et al. 2005)"

"Focusing only on evaluating poor teachers out of the profession is unlikely to produce a highly effective teaching force if there are not equally strong efforts to develop a steady supply of effective teachers entering and staying in the profession and becoming more effective over the course of their careers."

"Pre-service teacher preparation and mentoring enhance teacher effective- ness both by transmitting important knowledge and skills and by enabling teachers to stay in the profession and become more effective with experience."

"Providing expert mentors to coach beginners also reduces beginning teacher attrition, with rates of leaving reduced from more than 30 percent of begin- ners to as low as 5 percent in some dis- tricts that have introduced high-quality programs."

"There are, of course, substantial differences in the relative effectiveness of teacher education programs."

"These reforms depend centrally on creating new models of clinical practice that are tightly integrated with coursework. Many successful schools of education have done this by creating professional development relationships with local schools, working with these sites to train novices in the classrooms of expert teachers. Highly developed models have been found to increase teacher effectiveness and retention, foster instructional improvement, and raise student achievement."

"It is not surprising, then, that research shows that the same teacher typically looks more effective on value- added measures when she is teaching more advantaged students – and less effective when she is assigned more students who are low-income, new English learners, or who have special education needs (Newton et al., forth- coming). "

"...two major U.S. studies have recently found that schemes pay- ing teachers based on their students’ test score gains do not raise student achieve- ment overall – a sign that this strategy does not build teachers’ capacity and effectiveness furthermore (Springer
et al. 2010; Fryer 2011)"

"Initiatives to measure and recognize teacher effectiveness have emerged as the press for improved student achievement has been joined to an awareness of the importance of teach- ers in contributing to student learning. Such initiatives will have the greatest pay-off if they reflect and stimulate the practices known to support student learning and are embedded in systems that also develop greater teacher com- petence through strong preparation and mentoring, coaching in relation to standards, and opportunities for teach- ers to help their colleagues and their schools improve. Policies that create increasingly valid measures of teacher effectiveness and develop innovative systems for recognizing, developing, and using expert teachers, while provid- ing incentives for them to work with the neediest students, can ultimately help create a more effective teaching profession that serves the nation’s chil- dren more equitably."
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RSA - Choosing, Consuming & Social Change

RSA - Choosing, Consuming & Social Change | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

In this new RSAnimate, Professor Renata Salecl explores the paralysing anxiety and dissatisfaction surrounding limitless choice. Does the freedom to be the architects of our own lives actually hinder rather than help us? Does our preoccupation with choosing and consuming actually obstruct social change?

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Hechinger Report | Educated nation?

Hechinger Report | Educated nation? | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
To any objective observer, the facts underlying the debate had changed radically—but word had somehow failed to spread across the hall to the ostensible leaders of the political debate. It has long been known that early childhood is a critical time for brain development, but the extraordinary photos of neuron development captured by Patricia Kuhl, of the University of Washington, made this all the more clear. Using cutting-edge magnetic resonance technology, she showed that in the first months of an infant’s development, the brain synapses grow from frail connectors between the speaking and listening parts of the brain into super-rich highways, and then they are “pruned” back—all through usage. If the infant brain isn’t stimulated by usage in this key phase, neuron development is permanently lost. In short, Kuhl was proving graphically the “use-it-or-lose-it” model of brain development.

At the same time, the work of Harvard’s Jack Shonkoff showed that if a child doesn’t have a controlled, supportive environment in the early years, an overdose of stress can hinder the development of the brain and other organs. Taken together, we now have an explanation for how growing up poor in an unstimulating environment can permanently handicap a child’s ability to learn.
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Ten Steps to Better Student Engagement | Edutopia

Ten Steps to Better Student Engagement | Edutopia | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Project-learning teaching strategies can also improve your everyday classroom experience.

 

Create an Emotionally Safe Classroom

Create an Intellectually Safe Classroom

Cultivate Your Engagement Meter

Create Appropriate Intermediate Steps

Practice Journal or Blog Writing to Communicate with Students

Create a Culture of Explanation Instead of a Culture of the Right Answer

Teach Self-Awareness About Knowledge

Use Questioning Strategies That Make All Students Think and Answer

Practice Using the Design Process to Increase the Quality of Work

Market Your Projects

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Positive mindsets - David Perkins - Video search - Journey To Excellence

Positive mindsets - David Perkins - Video search - Journey To Excellence | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Listen as David Perkins explores the impact of limited mindsets on educational achievement and contrasts this with fostering growth mindsets that can increase personal capability.
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How Khan Academy Is Changing the Rules of Education

How Khan Academy Is Changing the Rules of Education | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Salman Khan's educational website of 2,400 video lessons could be the solution to middle-of-the-class mediocrity.
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China 'to overtake US on science'

China 'to overtake US on science' | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
China is on course to overtake the US in scientific output possibly as soon as 2013 - far earlier than expected.

That is the conclusion of a major new study by the Royal Society, the UK's national science academy.

The country that invented the compass, gunpowder, paper and printing is set for a globally important comeback.

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Twenty Tips for Creating a Safe Learning Environment

Twenty Tips for Creating a Safe Learning Environment | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
In her work with UCLA's Graduate School of Education, Rebecca Alber assists teachers and schools in meeting students' academic needs through best practices. Alber also instructs online teacher-education courses for Stanford University.

"Twenty Tips for Creating a Safe Learning Environment

I visit a lot of classrooms. And I'm always fascinated by the variety of ways teachers launch the new school year and also with how they "run their rooms" on a daily basis. From these visits and my own experiences as an instructor, I'd like to offer my top 20 suggestions for keeping your classroom a safe, open, and inviting place to learn."
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Projects by Students for Students: Pioneers - Resources for Teaching American Westward Expansion

Projects by Students for Students: Pioneers - Resources for Teaching American Westward Expansion | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
educational page about the pioneers of the 1800s in the United States and how they traveled to the frontiers and began new lives...

 

Many years ago people in the United States traveled to the new frontiers. Although in the 1700s the frontier was the Appalachian Mountains, later with westward expansion the frontier moved to the territories beyond the Mississippi River. Our web page will provide information about the pioneers who traveled not only to Oregon on the Oregon Trail and the Natchez Trace to Texas but all early American Pioneers. We have discovered that all pioneers had many of the same experiences. This site tells the story of the pioneers and their adventures on the trail to their new lives on the frontiers of North America.

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Glimmers of Hope

First there was Governor Jerry Brown’s veto of the education bill in California.  In his letter, the governor chided the legislature for continuing to rely upon standardized testing as the only ‘data’ that counts when measuring schools success.  In his own words: Finally, while SB547 attempts to improve the API, it relies on the same quantitative and standardized paradigm at the heart of the current system. The criticism of the API is that it has led schools to focus too narrowly on tested subjects and ignore other subjects and matters that are vital to a well-rounded education. SB547 certainly would add more things to measure, but it is doubtful that it would actually improve our schools. Adding more speedometers to a broken car won’t turn it into a high-performance machine.

And then, my favorite quote from his veto message:  SB547 nowhere mentions good character or love of learning. It does allude to student excitement and creativity, but does not take these qualities seriously because they can’t be placed in a data stream. Lost in the bill’s turgid mandates is any recognition that quality is fundamentally different from quantity. There are other ways to improve our schools to indeed focus on quality. What about a system that relies on locally convened panels to visit schools, observe teachers, interview students, and examine student work? Such a system wouldn’t produce an API number, but it could improve the quality of our schools.
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The Innovative Educator: 20 Things Students Want the Nation to Know About Education

The Innovative Educator: 20 Things Students Want the Nation to Know About Education | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Excerpt from The Innovative Educator

 

It's rare for education reformers, policymakers, and funders to listen to those at the heart of education reform work: The students. In fact Ann Curry who hosted Education Nation's first *student panel admitted folks at NBC were a little nervous about putting kids on stage. In their "Voices of a Nation" discussion, young people provided insight into their own experiences with education and what they think needs to be done to ensure that every student receives a world-class education. After the discussion Curry knew these students didn't disappoint. She told viewers, "Students wanted to say something that made a difference to you (adults) and they did. Now adults need to listen."

 

Below are [five of the twenty] sentiments shared by these current and former students during the segment.

 

1. I have to critically think in college, but your tests don't teach me that.
2. We learn in different ways at different rates.
3. I can't learn from you if you are not willing to connect with me.
4. Teaching by the book is not teaching. It's just talking.
5. Caring about each student is more important than teaching the class.

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Teachers Teaching Teachers, on Twitter: Q. and A. on 'Edchats'

Teachers Teaching Teachers, on Twitter: Q. and A. on 'Edchats' | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Teachers are taking professional development into their own hands with Twitter "edchats." In this post we explain, and interview four hosts of some popular weekly chats.

 

Like other groups with shared interests, from epidemiologists to James Joyce fans to locked-out N.F.L. players, teachers are turning to Twitter to collaborate, share resources and offer each other support.

 

Many, in fact, are using it to take professional development into their own hands, 140 characters at a time.

 

Each week, thousands of teachers participate in scheduled Twitter “chats” around a particular subject area or type of student. Math teachers meet on Mondays, for instance, while science discussions happen on Tuesdays, new teachers gather on Wednesdays and teachers working with sixth graders meet Thursdays. (Jerry Blumengarten, Twitter’s @cybraryman1, posts this helpful list [http://tinyurl.com/2dc7eoo] of educational chats.)

 

By using hashtags — that is, words or phrases preceded by the # symbol, like “#Scichat” for science educators — users can organize, search and find messages on a particular topic all in one place.


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Creativity and the Joy of Learning | EDUCAUSE

Just as you're saying, this idea of finding the audience, of not ghettoizing social media—there's simply too much talk out there: "Well, maybe I need to put my class on Facebook, because that's where the kids are." The real key here is that the professoriate—the people who are tenured, who are professional, who have the expertise and the experience in teaching and learning to make this happen—they need to be digital citizens themselves. They need to be modeling this behavior—instead of saying what I often hear: "Well, I think blogging is good for the students. I don't have time for that." Or: "Oh, I understand Twitter is a big deal. How can I use that in my class?" Asked if they know what Twitter is and if they understand how it works, the response usually is: "Oh, no, no, no. I don't have time for that."
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Glossary of Instructional Strategies

Glossary of Instructional Strategies | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Here is an alphabetized directory of instructional strategies.

Click on the title to access the directory.
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