Learning, Teaching & Leading Today
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The Death of the Fringe Suburb

The Death of the Fringe Suburb | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Simply put, there has been a profound structural shift — a reversal of what took place in the 1950s, when drivable suburbs boomed and flourished as center cities emptied and withered.

The shift is durable and lasting because of a major demographic event: the convergence of the two largest generations in American history, the baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) and the millennials (born between 1979 and 1996), which today represent half of the total population.

Many boomers are now empty nesters and approaching retirement. Generally this means that they will downsize their housing in the near future. Boomers want to live in a walkable urban downtown, a suburban town center or a small town, according to a recent survey by the National Association of Realtors.

The millennials are just now beginning to emerge from the nest — at least those who can afford to live on their own. This coming-of-age cohort also favors urban downtowns and suburban town centers — for lifestyle reasons and the convenience of not having to own cars."
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Learning, Teaching & Leading Today
Beyond Time ~ Space ~ Place
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Strategies to support students with dyslexia in the classroom

Neil Mackay shares strategies to support students with dyslexia to Teaching Assistants at Thomas Hardye School, Dorchester
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Curiosity Machine – Hands-on Science Projects

Curiosity Machine – Hands-on Science Projects | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Free hands-on science and engineering projects for families and educators. Build 80+ projects with everyday household materials.
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44 Smart Ways to Use Smartphones in Class (Part 1)

44 Smart Ways to Use Smartphones in Class (Part 1) | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
This week an online article grabbed my attention. Its title read “94 Percent of High School Students Using Cellphones in Class.” I immediately scoped out the heading and thought to myself, “Finally, teachers are beginning to embrace the powerful little gadgets.” However, it did not take me long to realize the researched article took quite a different slant.

One quotation in particular caused serious professional introspection on my behalf. The article quotes the researchers as stating, “‘The potential damage stemming from heightened cell phone use during class casts a pall on the entire educational system, on the school atmosphere, on the educational achievements of the class, on the pupil’s own learning experience and on the teacher’s burnout having to cope with discipline problems in class.’”

I understand the tougher task of using regular cell phones in class versus internet ready smartphones, however , I could not disagree more with the above quotation. Although there is no doubt the very same scenarios mentioned in the above article are occurring in various classrooms around the globe, I now encourage all students to bring their cellphones or smartphones to class. Just a few years prior, my colleagues and I were struggling mightily with how to integrate the crafty handheld tools.

A blessed trip to the ISTE 2011 conference in Philadelphia helped me devise a BYOD classroom management plan and opened my eyes to the infinite educational potential of smartphones in the classroom.
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7 Ways Mobile Technology Can Inspire Learners

7 Ways Mobile Technology Can Inspire Learners | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
It has been a hot topic among teachers for many years – should mobile technology be used in the classroom? It used to be a rule that mobile phones must be switched off to avoid distractions, however increasingly mobile technology is being embraced by schools as part of the learning process. To an extent the student is in charge of their own learning, gathering information from many different sources, not just traditional teaching methods. And there are many ways teaching professionals are now using mobile technology to inspire learners:
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Integrating Smartphones into the Classroom

These days, nearly everyone has a mobile phone or smartphone device. As a society, we have become dependant on these gadgets, to the point where it can be challenging to function without having access to a world of information – from transit schedules, to news, to weather or stock market updates – literally at our fingertips. However, as technology like slideshows and multimedia presentations become common fixtures in the classrooms, there remains a reluctance to embrace “social” media in the learning space. Instead, many instructors view mobile devices as potential distractions in the classroom that can serve to disengage students from the material at hand (Froese, Carpenter et al., 2012). In this article, I seek to challenge this paradigm concerning cellphone use in the classroom setting by proposing ways in which students can use their mobile devices to enhance the learning process by engaging with course material through innovative mediums. Through a review of the literature and research into emerging technologies, I will explain how smartphones can be used as an innovative tool to promote collaboration, enhance creativity, and improve communication in the classroom.
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Using Smartphones in the Classroom

Using Smartphones in the Classroom | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Ken Halla knows a thing or two about using technology in the classroom.

For the past 5 years, the 22-year teaching veteran has worked to transition his ninth-grade World History and AP Government classrooms into a mobile device-friendly environment where students can incorporate the latest technology into the learning process. Along the way, Halla created three of the most used education blogs in the country—“World History Teachers Blog,” “US Government Teachers Blog,” and “US History Teachers Blog”—to help fellow humanities teachers incorporate more technology and more device-based learning into their own classrooms.
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Ken Stabler and C.T.E.

Ken Stabler and C.T.E. | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
The family of Ken Stabler, the former Raiders quarterback who died in July at age 69, speaks about his life and the effects of C.T.E., which was diagnosed posthumously.
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N.F.L.-Backed Youth Program Says It Reduced Concussions. The Data Disagrees.

N.F.L.-Backed Youth Program Says It Reduced Concussions. The Data Disagrees. | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
The Heads Up Football program has been sold to youth football leagues and parents as statistically proven to reduce injuries, but a review of the evidence tells a different story.
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Why Student Loan Debt Exploded

Why Student Loan Debt Exploded | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Americans did not always come out of college with crushing debt. Now, many do. Student loan borrowers have doubled in the last 10 years to 42 million people. And student loan debt has exploded from $240 billion to $1.3 trillion. Borrowers talk about “debt slavery.” But a lot of money has been made on that debt.  A new investigative report asks: “Who got rich off the student debt crisis?” This hour On Point, the story behind America’s ocean of student debt. — Tom Ashbrook
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Who got rich off the [privatized] student [loan/] debt [program/] crisis?

Who got rich off the [privatized] student [loan/] debt [program/] crisis? | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
A generation ago, Congress privatized a student loan program intended to give more Americans access to higher education.

In its place, lawmakers created another profit center for Wall Street and a system of college finance that has fed the nation’s cycle of inequality. Step by step, Congress has enacted one law after another to make student debt the worst kind of debt for Americans – and the best kind for banks and debt collectors.

Today, just about everyone involved in the student loan industry makes money off students – the banks, private investors, even the federal government.

Jessie Suren is an energetic 28-year-old who wanted a career in law enforcement. Albert Lord is a 70-year-old former accountant who became a multimillionaire executive. The two have never met, but their stories tell the history of America’s student debt crisis.
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#FixCopyright: Copy explains 'Freedom of Panorama'

The European Commission is consulting on 'Freedom of Panorama' until 15 June 2016. Want to know more, check http://youcanfixcopyright.eu

This is a one-time opportunity to end the fact that copyright applies to images or drawings of buildings or monuments that are part of our panorama.

This Commission tries to collect input on the ‘panorama exception’, or as the EC puts it the “use of works, such as works of architecture or sculpture, made to be located permanently in public places”. In plain English, it’s all about the use of images of public space in a personal or commercial context. To clarify the latter, you need to see ‘commercial’ as a broad concept, when you think of the fact that Wikimedia is considered a commercial outlet or when posting on a blog or social media platform that includes advertising could be interpreted as commercial. The issue here is that there is an un-harmonised exception in the EU copyright legislation.
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5-Minute Film Festival: Celebrating Poetry Month

5-Minute Film Festival: Celebrating Poetry Month | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
There's no doubt that when taught well, poetry can get kids excited about reading, writing, performing, and finding their voice. As we approach the beginning of April, which is National Poetry Month, I've put together a selection of videos about the power of poetry for young people -- both in the classroom and beyond.

Video Playlist: Celebrate Poetry Month!
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Drawing Europe

Drawing Europe | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Politiken has taken the extraordinary step of asking 28 leading newspapers from the (still) 28 EU countries to let one of their cartoonists solve this task: Give us your interpretation of the European Community at this moment — and in the light of Brexit. • Politiken has launched this pan-European media initiative in order to demonstrate the kind of community, solidarity and cooperation that EU leaders find it difficult to maintain and develop at the moment. Politiken’s design editor, Søren Nyeland, has encouraged cartoonists across the continent to contribute to this collective work, which is now being published all over Europe. • A special print edition will be distributed in Brussels and at the summit in Bratislava where EU leaders are set to discuss the future of the union on September 16th."
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Ricard Garcia's curator insight, September 21, 2:48 AM
A good source of inspiration to have our students thinking and interpreting what they see on th cartoons about a very rellevant topic such as Brexit
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Using Meditation to Help Close the Achievement Gap

Using Meditation to Help Close the Achievement Gap | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Over the next three years, Visitacion Valley’s suspensions dropped by 79 percent, attendance rose to 98 percent, and students’ grade point averages rose each year. Of even greater interest, the increase in G.P.A. for the lowest performing demographic was double that for the overall student group.

Anecdotally, favorable feedback poured in from both students and staff members. One seventh grader at Visitacion Valley said, “I used to be really fidgety, couldn’t stay in my seat for very long. Now, after meditating, I can sit down for a whole class without standing up.” Barry O’Driscoll, the school’s director of physical education for the past 14 years, said, “In the first seven years of my tenure, the school was dominated by stress and fighting.” But in the last few years, he said, “we have had very few fights.”

One other middle school and two high schools in the Bay Area adopted the program. And a 2015 review of the program, issued by the Center for Wellness and Achievement in Education in collaboration with the San Francisco Unified School District research department, had more good news.

The results of 17 studies conducted to date in the Bay Area, varying in duration from three months to one year, showed benefits across parameters including reduced stress, increased emotional intelligence, reduced suspensions, increased attendance and increased academic performance.
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36 Smart Ways to Use Smartphones in Class (Part 2)

36 Smart Ways to Use Smartphones in Class (Part 2) | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
In continuation of last week’s article, Part 1: 44 Smart Ways to Use Smartphones in Class, here is a new list of thirty-six additional ideas to help leverage the power of these tech gadgets in the learning environment. In this blog post, I have attempted to avoid any redundancies, and I sincerely hope my endeavors were successful. Please join me in helping educators everywhere creatively use smartphones by contributing any overlooked uses and supportive responses via this survey. The shared comments can easily be assessed by clicking this link.
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floursnotty's comment, September 8, 11:23 PM

Breathtaking...!!
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Not Just a Distraction: How Mobile Phones Can Help Your Students Learn

Not Just a Distraction: How Mobile Phones Can Help Your Students Learn | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Are your students more interested in checking Facebook or playing Candy Crush than the material you’re covering? While mobile devices have long been verboten in the college classroom, if students are prioritizing time killers over learning, the problem may not really be the phone. After all, if students aren’t interested, they don’t need a phone to be distracted (yesterday’s students certainly found ways to escape, too, whether through pencil and paper, a window with a view, or communicating with classmates). Ultimately, distraction itself is nothing new, mobile devices are just the latest way students use to escape a course they don’t find interesting.

Your enemy as an instructor isn’t mobile phones: it’s distraction itself. Instead of taking an oppositional view to any and all cell phone use in the classroom, there are many ways to embrace technology that can get distracted students engaged and teach them how to transform their mobile devices into tools they can use in the classroom and later on in the workplace, an approach that can have the dual benefit of helping students learn to manage distractions while also covering the material required by your course.
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6 ways to use students’ smartphones for learning

Cell phones have had a checkered past in schools. When students first started bringing them to class, educators were fairly united in their opposition to the devices on grounds that they were a distraction and a means for easy cheating.

But thanks to an exponential increase in ubiquity and computing capacity, today’s smartphones make BYOD a feasible answer to many of the challenges that 1:1 programs face. They offer endless possibilities for higher engagement, enhancement of student understanding and extension of learning beyond the classroom, particularly if a student doesn’t have internet at home or attends a school where 1:1 is not an option. Smartphones also provide an easy way for teachers to “facilitate and inspire student learning and creativity” while increasing motivation, as espoused by the ISTE Standards for Teachers.

Best of all, research shows that when students are engaged in their learning — and they’re almost always engaged with their phones when given a choice — they are less likely to succumb to distractions. The goal is to give students ways to use this beloved technology to learn, collaborate, share and create in meaningful ways.

Here are six ways to use students’ smartphones that are sure to engage and inspire:

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The Hottest Education Posts Everyone's Reading

The Hottest Education Posts Everyone's Reading | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Moving From Lecture to Learning remains at the top for another week. This post is essential for innovative educators looking forward to #backtoschool strategies that go beyond the lecture. Also at the top is a topic on every teacher’s mind as they prepare for #backtoschool. Classroom set up and design. This post looks at what various classroom designs are inviting students to do. 

Moving up this week is a post that looks beyond students getting the right answers and onto how they can ask better questions.  

Making it's way to the top for the first time is an ethical response guide for educators whose students request their friendship on Facebook.  

Also at the top is a post that asks teachers to consider if the professional development they provide or attend contains the five qualities that are necessary for success. Check out that post to see what those qualities are.

Rounding out the top is a post that provides strategies to get to the thinking faster with alternatives to note taking. 

If any of these posts are of interest, check em out and share with others using the buttons below on Twitter, Facebook, email or whichever platform you like best.
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Updated Brain Map Identifies Nearly 100 New Regions

Updated Brain Map Identifies Nearly 100 New Regions | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"The brain looks like a featureless expanse of folds and bulges, but it’s actually carved up into invisible territories. Each is specialized: Some groups of neurons become active when we recognize faces, others when we read, others when we raise our hands. • On Wednesday, in what many experts are calling a milestone in neuroscience, researchers published a spectacular new map of the brain, detailing nearly 100 previously unknown regions — an unprecedented glimpse into the machinery of the human mind. • Scientists will rely on this guide as they attempt to understand virtually every aspect of the brain, from how it develops in children and ages over decades, to how it can be corrupted by diseases like Alzheimer’s and schizophrenia. • 'It’s a step towards understanding why we’re we,' said David Kleinfeld, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Diego, who was not involved in the research."
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Our democracy no longer represents the people. Here's how we fix it | Larry Lessig | TEDxMidAtlantic

Harvard Professor Lawrence Lessig makes the case that our democracy has become corrupt with money, leading to inequality that means only 0.02% of the United States population actually determines who's in power. Lessig says that this fundamental breakdown of the democratic system must be fixed before we will ever be able to address major challenges like climate change, social security, and student debt. This is not the most important problem, it's just the first problem.

Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School, former director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University, and founder of Rootstrikers, a network of activists leading the fight against government corruption. He has authored numerous books, including Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Our Congress—and a Plan to Stop It, Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Free Culture, and Remix.
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Public Schools? To Kansas Conservatives, They’re ‘Government Schools’

Public Schools? To Kansas Conservatives, They’re ‘Government Schools’ | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Kansas has for years been the stage for a messy school funding fight that has shaken the Legislature and reached the State Supreme Court. Gov. Sam Brownback, a Republican, and his political allies threatened to defy the court on education spending and slashed income taxes in their effort to make the state a model of conservatism. • Somewhere along the way, the term “government schools” entered the lexicon in place of references to the public school system. • 'Our local grade school is now the government school,' State Senator Forrest Knox wrote in an op-ed article last year, echoing conservative concerns that the government had inserted itself unnecessarily into education. • The intent was obvious to her, Ms. Massman said. 'They are trying to rebrand public education,' she said. • The use of the term has set off alarms even among some Republicans, who fear that it signals still less support, financially and otherwise, for the public schools in a state that had long felt pride over the quality of its education system. The recent adoption of a school finance plan that was acceptable to Mr. Brownback, the Legislature and the Kansas Supreme Court has not entirely assuaged those concerns."
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go fourth

"Intriguingly, July Fourth has become a telling historical core sample to the entire American experiment. A look at all the stuff that has happened on this date since the Founding Fathers penned their Declaration reveals the best of this country and, occasionally, the worst. Sometimes, the events of 7/4 happen because of the special historic power of the day. Sometimes, they’re just resonant with chance. But, overall, you won’t find a better prism for viewing where we’ve been and where we may yet be going. • For instance, on July 4, 1816, construction began in Rome, N.Y., on the Erie Canal, an eight-year project that announced unmistakably that America’s energies were headed westward, into a century of unparalleled expansionism. Suddenly the country was more than the Eastern Seaboard — it was the Great Lakes and beyond, and all its goods (and all the people who already lived there, too)."
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17 Things Not to Include in a Resume #infographic

17 Things Not to Include in a Resume #infographic | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
For every job vacancy, your resume is the first considerable factor. It is the factor that can decide your selection or rejection. A well written resume can ensure half victory. But if your resume lacks somewhere, you may not be able to get your dream job. While writing it, there are many points that need to be followed. Similarly, there are many points too which needs to be avoided within your resume. These points are commonly seen, but are ignored by the candidate. And because of that, they get rejected in the initial stage of recruitment.

The infographic below is solely designed for those who feel that their ineffective resume is the major reason behind the rejection. With the given points, you need to cross verify your resume and check out the loophole that needs to be recovered. After you notice the lacking points, amend them accordingly and send the final resume for your next job vacancy.
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Can democracy exist without trust? - Ivan Krastev

Five great revolutions have shaped political culture over the past 50 years, says theorist Ivan Krastev. He shows how each step forward -- from the cultural revolution of the '60s to recent revelations in the field of neuroscience -- has also helped erode trust in the tools of democracy. As he says, "What went right is also what went wrong." Can democracy survive?
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