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Mission Statement | This Land is Your Land Project | American Masters | PBS

Mission Statement | This Land is Your Land Project | American Masters | PBS | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"The THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND PROJECT is an interactive documentary to record us all singing Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land.”

Please record your cover by May 15, 2013, to be included in a video-mosaic (“mash-up”) of the “This Land” song that’ll stream on PBS.ORG.

The project is produced by American Masters/THIRTEEN in New York. It’s in support of the Woody Guthrie centennial, which is the basis for the project and partnership with the Woody Guthrie Foundation and Archives as they have been hosting Woody 100 events, concerts, and programs throughout the past year.

 

 

 

In addition to the final compilation video, the website’s focus will be the crowdsourced “This Land Is Your Land” songs: a place to experience as well as catalog for the historical record a diverse collection of a song that’s a part of our national canon, reflective of our American way of life.'

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Beyond Time ~ Space ~ Place
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Our democracy no longer represents the people. Here's how we fix it | Larry Lessig | TEDxMidAtlantic

Harvard Professor Lawrence Lessig makes the case that our democracy has become corrupt with money, leading to inequality that means only 0.02% of the United States population actually determines who's in power. Lessig says that this fundamental breakdown of the democratic system must be fixed before we will ever be able to address major challenges like climate change, social security, and student debt. This is not the most important problem, it's just the first problem.

Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School, former director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University, and founder of Rootstrikers, a network of activists leading the fight against government corruption. He has authored numerous books, including Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Our Congress—and a Plan to Stop It, Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Free Culture, and Remix.
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Updated Brain Map Identifies Nearly 100 New Regions

Updated Brain Map Identifies Nearly 100 New Regions | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"The brain looks like a featureless expanse of folds and bulges, but it’s actually carved up into invisible territories. Each is specialized: Some groups of neurons become active when we recognize faces, others when we read, others when we raise our hands. • On Wednesday, in what many experts are calling a milestone in neuroscience, researchers published a spectacular new map of the brain, detailing nearly 100 previously unknown regions — an unprecedented glimpse into the machinery of the human mind. • Scientists will rely on this guide as they attempt to understand virtually every aspect of the brain, from how it develops in children and ages over decades, to how it can be corrupted by diseases like Alzheimer’s and schizophrenia. • 'It’s a step towards understanding why we’re we,' said David Kleinfeld, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Diego, who was not involved in the research."
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Why Student Loan Debt Exploded

Why Student Loan Debt Exploded | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Americans did not always come out of college with crushing debt. Now, many do. Student loan borrowers have doubled in the last 10 years to 42 million people. And student loan debt has exploded from $240 billion to $1.3 trillion. Borrowers talk about “debt slavery.” But a lot of money has been made on that debt.  A new investigative report asks: “Who got rich off the student debt crisis?” This hour On Point, the story behind America’s ocean of student debt. — Tom Ashbrook
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Who got rich off the [privatized] student [loan/] debt [program/] crisis?

Who got rich off the [privatized] student [loan/] debt [program/] crisis? | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
A generation ago, Congress privatized a student loan program intended to give more Americans access to higher education.

In its place, lawmakers created another profit center for Wall Street and a system of college finance that has fed the nation’s cycle of inequality. Step by step, Congress has enacted one law after another to make student debt the worst kind of debt for Americans – and the best kind for banks and debt collectors.

Today, just about everyone involved in the student loan industry makes money off students – the banks, private investors, even the federal government.

Jessie Suren is an energetic 28-year-old who wanted a career in law enforcement. Albert Lord is a 70-year-old former accountant who became a multimillionaire executive. The two have never met, but their stories tell the history of America’s student debt crisis.
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#FixCopyright: Copy explains 'Freedom of Panorama'

The European Commission is consulting on 'Freedom of Panorama' until 15 June 2016. Want to know more, check http://youcanfixcopyright.eu

This is a one-time opportunity to end the fact that copyright applies to images or drawings of buildings or monuments that are part of our panorama.

This Commission tries to collect input on the ‘panorama exception’, or as the EC puts it the “use of works, such as works of architecture or sculpture, made to be located permanently in public places”. In plain English, it’s all about the use of images of public space in a personal or commercial context. To clarify the latter, you need to see ‘commercial’ as a broad concept, when you think of the fact that Wikimedia is considered a commercial outlet or when posting on a blog or social media platform that includes advertising could be interpreted as commercial. The issue here is that there is an un-harmonised exception in the EU copyright legislation.
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5-Minute Film Festival: Celebrating Poetry Month

5-Minute Film Festival: Celebrating Poetry Month | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
There's no doubt that when taught well, poetry can get kids excited about reading, writing, performing, and finding their voice. As we approach the beginning of April, which is National Poetry Month, I've put together a selection of videos about the power of poetry for young people -- both in the classroom and beyond.

Video Playlist: Celebrate Poetry Month!
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4 Reasons to Start Class With a Poem Each Day

4 Reasons to Start Class With a Poem Each Day | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"For each school day of the past three years, I've started my ninth-grade English class with a poem. When I first made this commitment, I feared that I might not have the stamina (or enough engaging poems) to sustain us for the full 184 days of class. And I wasn't the only skeptic. Each year, I get a few sideways glances and furrowed brows when I explain our daily opening routine for class. But before long, students are starting English class with Billy Collins and Mary Oliver and Robert Pinsky, Rumi and Basho and Shakespeare. These voices, contemporary and classic, have helped define my classroom culture to such an extent that on the rare occasion when I postpone the 'Poem of the Day' until later in the class period, my students interrogate me about it. I confess that it makes me smile.

So if this year's National Poetry Month inspires you to give daily poetry a go in your classroom, maybe even just for the month, consider these four reasons why starting class with a poem each day will rock your world. Just for good measure, I've included a few poem suggestions as well."

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There’s a good reason Americans are horrible at science

There’s a good reason Americans are horrible at science | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
It is possible, however, to learn enough about the powers and limitations of the scientific method to intelligently determine which claims made by scientists are likely to be true and which deserve skepticism. As a starting point, we could teach our children that the theories and technologies that have been tested the most times, by the largest number of independent observers, over the greatest number of years, are the most likely to be reliable. If someone is going to choose areas of science to reject, evolution and vaccines are terrible choices. We should also teach our children about the ways in which data can be misinterpreted and manipulated, and how much bias plays a role in how information is presented. Most importantly, if we want future generations to be truly scientifically literate, we should teach our children that science is not a collection of immutable facts but a method for temporarily setting aside some of our ubiquitous human frailties, our biases and irrationality, our longing to confirm our most comforting beliefs, our mental laziness. Facts can be used in the way a drunk uses a lamppost, for support. Science illuminates the universe.
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Series Reading Program: Creating a Culture of Reading

Series Reading Program: Creating a Culture of Reading | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
At Walter Bracken STEAM Academy, 100 percent of the fifth-grade students are meeting grade-level fluency standards in reading.
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Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle. The results of these analyses were published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 21, 1:38 PM

This still image above doesn't do justice to this animated map of bird migrations (species key here).  While modern humans by and large are tied to particular plots of land, not all species have that same approach to gathering and using resources.  On #DarwinDay, it is important to consider the connections between biology and geography; many of the greatest biological discoveries were spatial and geographic in nature.   

 

Tagsphysicalecology, biogeography, environment, mapping, scale, location.

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True Scandal of Deflategate Lies in the N.F.L.’s Behavior

True Scandal of Deflategate Lies in the N.F.L.’s Behavior | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"John Leonard is a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who roots for the Philadelphia Eagles, listens to sports talk radio when he is exercising, and teaches a course called Measurement and Instrumentation. When the Deflategate story broke after last year’s A.F.C. championship game between the New England Patriots and the Indianapolis Colts, he found himself fixated on it, yearning to dig into it from a scientific point of view.

On the off chance you have spent the last year on Mars, Deflategate refers to the scandal that ensued after the Colts accused the Patriots of deflating their footballs to give quarterback Tom Brady an unfair edge — an accusation that the N.F.L. and its commissioner, Roger Goodell, ultimately determined was probably true.

'Of course, I thought of the Ideal Gas Law right away,' Leonard says, 'but there was no data to test it.' Although the N.F.L. had measured the pounds per square inch (p.s.i.) of the Patriots’ footballs at halftime after the Colts complained — under the rules, game balls must be inflated to pressures ranging from 12.5 to 13.5 p.s.i. — it had not released any numbers."

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Educational Technology Videos | November Learning

Educational Technology Videos | November Learning | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
November Learning videos feature highlights of our conference and showcase instructional strategies for greater learning outcomes.
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Ken Stabler and C.T.E.

Ken Stabler and C.T.E. | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
The family of Ken Stabler, the former Raiders quarterback who died in July at age 69, speaks about his life and the effects of C.T.E., which was diagnosed posthumously.
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N.F.L.-Backed Youth Program Says It Reduced Concussions. The Data Disagrees.

N.F.L.-Backed Youth Program Says It Reduced Concussions. The Data Disagrees. | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
The Heads Up Football program has been sold to youth football leagues and parents as statistically proven to reduce injuries, but a review of the evidence tells a different story.
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Public Schools? To Kansas Conservatives, They’re ‘Government Schools’

Public Schools? To Kansas Conservatives, They’re ‘Government Schools’ | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Kansas has for years been the stage for a messy school funding fight that has shaken the Legislature and reached the State Supreme Court. Gov. Sam Brownback, a Republican, and his political allies threatened to defy the court on education spending and slashed income taxes in their effort to make the state a model of conservatism. • Somewhere along the way, the term “government schools” entered the lexicon in place of references to the public school system. • 'Our local grade school is now the government school,' State Senator Forrest Knox wrote in an op-ed article last year, echoing conservative concerns that the government had inserted itself unnecessarily into education. • The intent was obvious to her, Ms. Massman said. 'They are trying to rebrand public education,' she said. • The use of the term has set off alarms even among some Republicans, who fear that it signals still less support, financially and otherwise, for the public schools in a state that had long felt pride over the quality of its education system. The recent adoption of a school finance plan that was acceptable to Mr. Brownback, the Legislature and the Kansas Supreme Court has not entirely assuaged those concerns."
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go fourth

"Intriguingly, July Fourth has become a telling historical core sample to the entire American experiment. A look at all the stuff that has happened on this date since the Founding Fathers penned their Declaration reveals the best of this country and, occasionally, the worst. Sometimes, the events of 7/4 happen because of the special historic power of the day. Sometimes, they’re just resonant with chance. But, overall, you won’t find a better prism for viewing where we’ve been and where we may yet be going. • For instance, on July 4, 1816, construction began in Rome, N.Y., on the Erie Canal, an eight-year project that announced unmistakably that America’s energies were headed westward, into a century of unparalleled expansionism. Suddenly the country was more than the Eastern Seaboard — it was the Great Lakes and beyond, and all its goods (and all the people who already lived there, too)."
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17 Things Not to Include in a Resume #infographic

17 Things Not to Include in a Resume #infographic | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
For every job vacancy, your resume is the first considerable factor. It is the factor that can decide your selection or rejection. A well written resume can ensure half victory. But if your resume lacks somewhere, you may not be able to get your dream job. While writing it, there are many points that need to be followed. Similarly, there are many points too which needs to be avoided within your resume. These points are commonly seen, but are ignored by the candidate. And because of that, they get rejected in the initial stage of recruitment.

The infographic below is solely designed for those who feel that their ineffective resume is the major reason behind the rejection. With the given points, you need to cross verify your resume and check out the loophole that needs to be recovered. After you notice the lacking points, amend them accordingly and send the final resume for your next job vacancy.
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Can democracy exist without trust? - Ivan Krastev

Five great revolutions have shaped political culture over the past 50 years, says theorist Ivan Krastev. He shows how each step forward -- from the cultural revolution of the '60s to recent revelations in the field of neuroscience -- has also helped erode trust in the tools of democracy. As he says, "What went right is also what went wrong." Can democracy survive?
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National Poetry Month: Useful Resources for Teachers and Students

National Poetry Month: Useful Resources for Teachers and Students | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
'Tis National Poetry Month! In April, classrooms around the country will dive into the expressive art of poetry -- Shakespeare, Neruda, Angelou, Hughes, Dickinson, the list goes on and on.

There are many great ways to bring poetry into the classroom, and whether it's through reading, writing, or performing, poetry can be a great way to engage students. To help you bring poetry into your classrooms, we've compiled a list of some of the best open resources.
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Nearly all of our medical research is wrong

Nearly all of our medical research is wrong | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Something is rotten in the state of biomedical research. Everyone who works in the field knows this on some level. We applaud presentations by colleagues at conferences, hoping that they will extend the same courtesy to us, but we know in our hearts that the majority or even the vast majority of our research claims are false.

When it came to light that the biotechnology firm Amgen tried to reproduce 53 'landmark' cancer studies and managed to confirm only six, scientists were “shocked.” It was terrible news, but if we’re honest with ourselves, not entirely unexpected. The pernicious problem of irreproducible data has been discussed among scientists for decades. Bad science wastes a colossal amount of money, not only on the irreproducible studies themselves, but on misguided drug development and follow-up trials based on false information. And while unsound preclinical studies may not directly harm patients, there is an enormous opportunity cost when drug makers spend their time on wild goose chases. Discussions about irreproducibility usually ends with shrugs, however—what can we do to combat such a deep-seated, systemic problem?"

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Don’t Turn Away From the Art of Life

"Enthusiasm for the Humanities, though, is much diminished in today’s educational institutions. Our data-driven culture bears much of the blame: The arts can no longer compete with the prestige and financial payoffs promised by studying the STEM fields — a curriculum integrating science, technology, engineering and mathematics. These are all worthy disciplines that offer precise information on practically everything. But, often and inadvertently, they distort our perceptions; they even shortchange us. • The regime of information may well sport its specific truths, but it is locked out of the associations — subjective but also moral and philosophical — that bathe all literature. A new technology like GPS provides us with the most efficient and direct route to a destination, but it presupposes we know where we are going. Finding an address is one thing; finding one’s way in life is another. Even our smartest computers or most brilliant statisticians are at a loss when it comes to mapping our psychic landscapes. • When and how do you take your own measure? And what are you measuring? Both Oedipus and Lear could initially subscribe to Shakespeare’s notation, 'every inch a king,' but by play’s end, something different, varied and terrifying has come to light: for one, an unknown history of parricide and incest, for the other, an opening into a moral vision of such force that it wrecks all prior frames, leading to madness, as Lear suffers his kinship with all 'bare, fork’d animal[s].' Life’s actual hurdy-gurdy often explodes our labels and preconceptions. • 'How much do you know about Shakespeare,' I once asked a friend who has committed much of her life to studying the Bard. She replied, 'Not as much as he knows about me.' Remember this the next time someone tells you literature is useless. •Why does this matter? The humanities interrogate us. They challenge our sense of who we are, even of who our brothers and sisters might be. When President Obama said of Trayvon Martin, 'this could have been my son,' he was uttering a truth that goes beyond compassion and reaches toward recognition. 'It could have been me' is the threshold for the vistas that literature and art make available to us."
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13 Tips for Recording Your iPhone, iPad, or iPod - TechSmith

13 Tips for Recording Your iPhone, iPad, or iPod - TechSmith | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
It’s easier than ever to capture activity on your iOS device screen and turn it into a movie. It’s just a matter of mirroring your device onto your laptop with any number of apps then firing up a tool like Camtasia to record what’s happening on your screen.

But there are still a few quirky things you may encounter along the way. These tips will help you get great results the first time you dive into iOS screencasting.

Via John Evans
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Calliope Global Fran's curator insight, February 12, 7:37 AM

Great & thorough article/explanation! Tx, TechSmith!

Carol Hancox's curator insight, February 12, 7:05 PM

Good tips if students are recording from their device for assessment purposes

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On Video, a First Grader, a Stumble in Math and a [Success Academy Charter Schools'] Teacher’s Anger

On Video, a First Grader, a Stumble in Math and a [Success Academy Charter Schools'] Teacher’s Anger | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"… Joseph P. McDonald, a professor of teaching and learning at New York University’s school of education, who viewed the video at The New York Times’s request, described Ms. Dial’s behavior as 'abusive teaching.'

'We don’t see enough here to know for sure that this classroom is typically full of fear, but I bet that it is,' he wrote in an email. 'The fear is likely not only about whether my teacher may at any time erupt with anger and punish me dramatically, but also whether I can ever be safe making mistakes.'

Indeed, several of the current and former staff members interviewed said that the network’s culture encouraged teachers to make students fear them in order to motivate them. Carly Ginsberg, 22, who taught for about six months last year at Success Academy Prospect Heights, said teachers ripped up the papers of children as young as kindergarten as the principal or assistant principal watched. She once witnessed a girl’s humiliation as the principal mocked her low test score to another adult in front of the child. 

In one instance, the lead kindergarten teacher in her classroom made a girl who had stumbled reciting a math problem cry so hard that she vomited. Ms. Ginsberg resigned in December because she was so uncomfortable with the school’s approach. 'It felt like I was witnessing child abuse,' she said, adding, 'If this were my kindergarten experience, I would be traumatized.'"

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