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Providing Feedback | Researched-Based Strategies | Focus on Effectiveness

Providing Feedback | Researched-Based Strategies | Focus on Effectiveness | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Providing the right kind of feedback to students can make a significant difference in their achievement. There are two key considerations. First, feedback that improves learning is responsive to specific aspects of student work, such as test or homework answers, and provides specific and related suggestions. There needs to be a strong link between the teacher comment and the student's answer, and it must be instructive. This kind of feedback extends the opportunity to teach by alleviating misunderstanding and reinforcing learning. Second, the feedback must be timely. If students receive feedback no more than a day after a test or homework assignment has been turned in, it will increase the window of opportunity for learning. Feedback is a research-based strategy that teachers, and students, can practice to improve their success.


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Anne-Marie Armstrong's curator insight, February 1, 2013 11:02 AM

True at all levels.   My goal is to try to do this.

Anne-Marie Armstrong's comment, February 1, 2013 11:03 AM
Making it my goal for my online courses.
systerwoody's comment, February 4, 2013 2:30 PM
The challenge is in providing timely feedback spread across 3-4 courses with 25+ students each. Nearly impossible with writing intensive programs, which is a majority of doctoral programs. Sink or swim!
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Bill Moyers: The Challenge of Journalism Is to Survive in the Pressure Cooker of Plutocracy | BillMoyers.com

"In a new speech, Bill Moyers chronicles the struggle of today's journalists to report the truth despite dwindling resources and the opposition of the powerful." • "And what happens when PR turns a profit and truth goes penniless? One of my mentors told me that 'News is what people want to keep hidden, everything else is publicity.' So who will be left to report on what is happening in the statehouse or at the town hall? In the backrooms of Congress, the board rooms of banks and corporations, or even the open and shameless bazaar of K Street where the mercenaries of crony capitalism uncork bottles of champagne paid for by 'dark money' from oligarchs and PACs? What happens when our elections are insider-driven charades conducted for profit by professional operatives whose spending on advertising mainly enriches themselves and the cable and television stations in cahoots with them? We know the answer, we know that a shortage of substantial reporting means corruption remains hidden, candidates we know little about and even less about who is funding them and what policy outcomes they are buying. It also means even more terrifying possibilities. As Tom Stoppard writes in his play Night and Day, 'People do terrible things to each other, but it’s worse in the places where everybody is kept in the dark.' • A free press, you see, doesn’t operate for free at all. Fearless journalism requires a steady stream of independent income. Allow me to speak from personal experience. After I left government in 1967 — including a stint as White House press secretary — it took me a while to get my footing back in journalism. I can assure you: I found the job of trying to tell the truth about people whose job it is to hide the truth almost as complicated and difficult as trying to hide it in the first place. Unless you’re willing to fight and re-fight the same battles until you go blue in the face, drive the people you work for nuts going over every last detail again and again to make certain you’ve got it right, and then take hit after hit accusing you of 'bias,' there’s no use even trying. You have to love it, and I have. And still do."
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What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers

What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Universities are struggling to figure out how to impart information to students that won’t be overridden in the near future by computers and robots."
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A Victory for Pope Francis

"The beatification of an assassinated archbishop is an important marker in the routing of hard-line conservatives in the church."
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Duh! Learning should be collaborative, personalized and tech-supported

Duh! Learning should be collaborative, personalized and tech-supported | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Students favor a learning environment that is personalized, collaborative and supported by technology, according to the 2014 Speak Up Survey."
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The News Should Be for Everyone, Not Just the Rich

The News Should Be for Everyone, Not Just the Rich | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"People with lower incomes have just as much of an appetite for information, but few media outlets keep them in mind. Can that imbalance be fixed?"
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What’s the Point of a Professor?

What’s the Point of a Professor? | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"We used to be mentors and moral authorities. Now we just hand out A’s." • "In our hunger for guidance, we were ordinary. The American Freshman Survey, which has followed students since 1966, proves the point. One prompt in the questionnaire asks entering freshmen about 'objectives considered to be essential or very important.' In 1967, 86 percent of respondents checked 'developing a meaningful philosophy of life,' more than double the number who said 'being very well off financially.' • Naturally, students looked to professors for moral and worldly understanding. Since then, though, finding meaning and making money have traded places. The first has plummeted to 45 percent; the second has soared to 82 percent. "
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Summer reading? Pope Francis suggests Dante's 'Divine Comedy'

"Don't worry about what to pick for summer reading this year. Pope Francis has a suggestion: Dante's 'Divine Comedy.' • Francis had much praise for the 14th century allegorical poem as the Italian government celebrated the 750th anniversary of Dante's birth May 4. Francis is quoted as saying, in both the Italian and U.S. media, that Dante's experience can help us "get through the many dark woods we come across in our world." • Catholic News Service quotes the pope as calling Dante 'a prophet of hope, herald of the possibility of redemption, liberation and the profound transformation of every man and woman, of all humanity.'"
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Carl Sagan's Rules for Critical Thinking and Nonsense-Detection

Carl Sagan's Rules for Critical Thinking and Nonsense-Detection | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
A toolkit for nonsense-busting and critical thinking from the beloved science icon.
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3 Important Updates to Google Classroom Teachers Should Know About

3 Important Updates to Google Classroom Teachers Should Know About | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Google Classroom celebrates this year’s Teacher Appreciation Week with the release of some new interesting features to its mobile apps. These new updates are geared towards enhancing Classroom performance by allowing teachers to stay updated of their classes whenever and wherever they are. Here is a run-down of the new features. More releases are to be announced this week."
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Why the New Research on Mobility Matters: An Economist’s View

Why the New Research on Mobility Matters: An Economist’s View | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Their findings are clear: The earlier a family moved to a good neighborhood, the better the children’s long-run outcomes. The effects are symmetric, too, with each extra year in a worse neighborhood leading to worse long-run outcomes. Most important, they find that each extra year of childhood exposure yields roughly the same change in longer-run outcomes, but that beyond age 23, further exposure has no effect. That is, what matters is not just the quality of your neighborhood, but also the number of childhood years that you are exposed to it.

A crucial advantage of this analysis is that it follows the children through to early adulthood. This matters because a number of recent studies have shown that interventions have effects that might be hard to discern in test scores or behavioral problems, but that become evident in adulthood. The same pattern of years of exposure to good neighborhoods shaping outcomes is also apparent for college attendance, teenage births, teenage employment and marriage.

These findings replicate many of the key insights from the Moving to Opportunity experiment with far greater statistical resolution, which means there is effectively no chance that are simply due to luck.
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The Fermi Paradox — Where Are All The Aliens?

"The universe is unbelievably big – trillions of stars and even more planets. Soo… there just has to be life out there, right? But where is it?"
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How Smart Should the President Be?

How Smart Should the President Be? | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"A historical analysis suggests a link between IQ and performance."
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It's A Question Of 'Character'

It's A Question Of 'Character' | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"New York Times columnist David Brooks on finding moral character in a self-preoccupied society."
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Teachers' Guide to The Use of Google Voice in Education

Teachers' Guide to The Use of Google Voice in Education | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Google Voice is a great communicational utility with huge educational potential. As a teacher, you can use Google Voice to obtain a phone number to use when communicating with students and parents without you revealing your personal phone number. You can connect your Google Voice number with multiple phone numbers (e.g landline number, mobile number, work number) and have incoming calls routed to all of these numbers simultaneously. You can also select a single number to forward all your incoming calls to. • The voicemail features of Google Voiceare also wonderful. All voicemails are recorded and transcribed. Only transcription of English messages is available for now.You can set up your voicemail so you get voicemails emailed straight to your Gmail account. Also, voicemails are available as audio files that can be saved and embedded into a website or blog or used in audio editing tools such as Garageband or Audacity to create audio files for classroom projects."
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Weary of Relativity

Weary of Relativity | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Outrageous incomes? Obscene fund-raising? As long as you’re more awful, I’m O.K."
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The case for project-based learning

The case for project-based learning | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Project-based learning is not some new-fangled teaching method just coming into vogue. In fact, use of the PBL approach can be tracked back to the big thinkers, including Confucius, Aristotle and Socrates. Its longevity is due to one of the key outcomes it provides: keeping students happily engaged in rigorous learning. • Of course, the ancient philosophers didn’t foresee PBL’s connection to ed tech, but they did seem to comprehend the benefits students derive from the approach, including a deep understanding of content, the ability to transfer knowledge to new contexts, improved ability to collaborate and better content retention, to name a few. • What the research says..."
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5 virtual worlds for engaged learning

5 virtual worlds for engaged learning | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"You’ve probably heard that virtual worlds like Minecraft, World of Warcraft and Second Life are fun."
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How to Ask for a Raise, According to a Hostage Negotiator

How to Ask for a Raise, According to a Hostage Negotiator | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"It's possible to get a higher salary without taking anyone captive."
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Microsoft to stop producing Windows versions - BBC News

Microsoft to stop producing Windows versions - BBC News | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Windows 10 will be the last version of the operating system to be numbered, says Microsoft executive."
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Happy Teacher Appreciation Week!

Happy Teacher Appreciation Week! | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Attention all teachers: We want to thank you for your hard work and dedication all year long!"
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How Math Teachers Use Math in Their Non-Math-Teaching Lives (with image, tweets)

Math teachers: how have you used math this week in your non math-teaching life?
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The Best and Worst Places to Grow Up: How Your Area Compares

The Best and Worst Places to Grow Up: How Your Area Compares | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Location matters – enormously. If you’re poor and live in the Boston area, it’s better to be in Norfolk County than in Essex County or Suffolk County. Not only that, the younger you are when you move to Norfolk, the better you will do on average. Children who move at earlier ages are less likely to become single parents, more likely to go to college and more likely to earn more.

Every year a poor child spends in Norfolk County adds about $140 to his or her annual household income at age 26, compared with a childhood spent in the average American county. Over the course of a full childhood, which is up to age 20 for the purposes of this analysis, the difference adds up to about $2,800, or 11 percent, more in average income as a young adult.
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Under the Sea, a Missing Link in the Evolution of Complex Cells

Under the Sea, a Missing Link in the Evolution of Complex Cells | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Scientists estimate that the first eukaryotes evolved about 2 billion years ago, in one of the greatest transitions in the history of life. But there is little evidence of this momentous event, no missing link that helps researchers trace the evolution of life from simple microbes to eukaryotes..

On Wednesday, a team of scientists announced the discovery of just such a transitional form. At the bottom of the Arctic Ocean, they found microbes that have many — but not all — of the features previously only found in eukaryotes. These microbes may show us what the progenitors of complex cellular organisms looked like.

'This is a genuine breakthrough,' said Eugene Koonin, an evolutionary biologist at the National Center for Biotechnology Information who was not involved in the research. 'It’s almost too good to be true.'”

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