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Study shows playing football before age 12 can lead to mood and behavior issues

Study shows playing football before age 12 can lead to mood and behavior issues | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
A new medical study has found that children who play football before age 12 suffer mood and behavior problems later in life at rates significantly higher than those who take up the sport later.

The study, which was published Tuesday in the medical journal Translational Psychiatry, showed those who participated in football before age 12 were twice as likely to have problems with behavior regulation, apathy, and executive functioning — including initiating activities, problem solving, planning and organizing — when they get older. The younger football players were three times more likely as those who took up the sport after age 12 to experience symptoms of depression.

“Between the ages of 10 and 12, there is this period of incredible development of the brain,” said Dr. Robert Stern, the director of clinical research at Boston University’s Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Center who co-authored the study. “Perhaps that is a window of vulnerability. . . . It makes sense that children whose brains are rapidly developing should not be hitting their heads over and over again.”
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Obama slams Trump for rescinding DACA

Obama slams Trump for rescinding DACA | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Washington (CNN)Former President Barack Obama on Tuesday bashed his successor's decision to rescind an immigration order shielding some children of undocumented immigrants from deportation, calling the move "cruel" and "self-defeating."

"To target these young people is wrong -- because they have done nothing wrong," Obama wrote in a post on Facebook hours after the decision was announced by President Donald Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions. "It is self-defeating -- because they want to start new businesses, staff our labs, serve in our military, and otherwise contribute to the country we love. And it is cruel."
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100 Report Card Comments You Can Use Now

100 Report Card Comments You Can Use Now | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
When teachers talk about the joys of teaching, I'm pretty sure they aren't talking about report card writing. It may just rank right up there with indoor recess, yard duty, and staff meetings. But report cards don't have to be such a pain. Here are a few report card general principles, followed by my handy dandy list of editable go-t
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What Does America Stand For? We Asked Teenagers

What Does America Stand For? We Asked Teenagers | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Beginning in early 2017, I began asking teenagers around the country to make videos in which they responded to the following question: “What are your values as a person? What are American values? Do you think the country is living up to those values today? Why or why not?” Their answers have a new urgency in the wake of the violence in Charlottesville, Va., which has brought lingering questions about America’s past, present and future to the forefront of the national conversation.

The footage in the video above was all submitted before the rally in Charlottesville. I was inspired to collect it by my conversations with young people in the months following the 2016 election. It started with an election-week experiment — I wanted to hear what first-time voters in Pennsylvania had to say about starting their voting lives in what already felt, to me, like a historically bizarre time. In the weeks that followed, I talked to young protesters, youth reporters at a local newspaper and teenage environmental activists.

Adults often dismiss teenagers, assuming that they’re callow, apathetic or uninformed. But the kids I was meeting cared passionately about education, foreign policy, racial justice and more. Even when they weren’t sure how they felt about a certain candidate or issue, they were clearly thinking deeply.
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Why Augmented Reality Will Transform Education Infographic

Why Augmented Reality Will Transform Education Infographic | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Augmented reality has the potential to revolutionize learning in primary and secondary schools more than any other technology has done in the recent past.

Via Nik Peachey
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Albert Chia's curator insight, August 10, 11:53 AM
#innovation #edchat #edtech #teachersmatter 
OFFREDI Didier's curator insight, August 11, 6:11 AM
Why Augmented Reality Will Transform Education Infographic | #Infographics #ModernEDU | @scoopit via @knolinfos http://sco.lt/...
Suzana Biseul PRo's curator insight, September 11, 4:21 AM
Pas mal comme infographie!
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Study: CTE Found In Nearly All Donated NFL Player Brains

Study: CTE Found In Nearly All Donated NFL Player Brains | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
McKee cautions, however, that researchers cannot extrapolate from the numbers and come to conclusions about CTE.

All the brains studied were donated, she says. "Families don't donate brains of their loved ones unless they're concerned about the person. So all the players in this study, on some level, were symptomatic. That leaves you with a very skewed population."

Still, McKee is adamant about one point.

"We're seeing this [CTE] in a very large number that participated in football for many years. So while we don't know the exact risk and we don't know the exact number, we know this is a problem in football."

Longtime concussion expert Dr. Munro Cullum says the study is helpful for several reasons. "It obviously adds to the cases in the literature," he says. "It has expanded the age range [of those with CTE] beyond just retired NFL players. And [researchers] did find increasing CTE pathology in the cases [of players] who were older. That's all useful information."
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The Largest Mass Migration to See a Natural Event Is Coming

The Largest Mass Migration to See a Natural Event Is Coming | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
This month’s solar eclipse is likely to put major pressures on infrastructure.
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Neil deGrasse Tyson blames U.S. schools for flat-Earthers — and teachers aren’t amused

Neil deGrasse Tyson blames U.S. schools for flat-Earthers — and teachers aren’t amused | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Famed astrophysicist sets off a Twitter frenzy with a simple tweet.
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How Google Took Over the Classroom

How Google Took Over the Classroom | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"CHICAGO — The sixth graders at Newton Bateman, a public elementary school here with a classic red brick facade, know the Google drill.

In a social-science class last year, the students each grabbed a Google-powered laptop. They opened Google Classroom, an app where teachers make assignments. Then they clicked on Google Docs, a writing program, and began composing essays.

Looking up from her laptop, Masuma Khan, then 11 years old, said her essay explored how schooling in ancient Athens differed from her own. “Back then, they had wooden tablets and they had to take all of their notes on it,” she said. “Nowadays, we can just do it in Google Docs.”

Chicago Public Schools, the third-largest school district in the United States, with about 381,000 students, is at the forefront of a profound shift in American education: the Googlification of the classroom.


In the space of just five years, Google has helped upend the sales methods companies use to place their products in classrooms. It has enlisted teachers and administrators to promote Google’s products to other schools. It has directly reached out to educators to test its products — effectively bypassing senior district officials. And it has outmaneuvered Apple and Microsoft with a powerful combination of low-cost laptops, called Chromebooks, and free classroom apps."

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Home Alone With the Ghost of Emily Dickinson

Home Alone With the Ghost of Emily Dickinson | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"AMHERST, Mass. — Does it matter where a writer lived? Can creativity and inspiration insinuate themselves into a physical space, somehow becoming part of the atmosphere? Do you believe in ghosts? • It’s impossible not to think about these things when you visit the Emily Dickinson Museum, which includes the house where Dickinson spent most of her outwardly uneventful life, her fierce mind raging away, quietly producing her profound and enigmatic poetry. Perhaps more than most writers, Dickinson is closely associated with one spot. You can’t really separate the poet from the house. • On a recent afternoon, I found myself all alone in Dickinson’s bedroom, having paid $100 for the chance to spend an hour there. (The price has now increased; people can also pay for two hours or to go in with a friend.) It was one of those days. I’d arrived by train and cab from New York, my nerves a little jangly, my head buzzing, fretting about being late, compulsively checking my phone. And now here I was, in a place redolent of a long-ago past, trying to corral my thoughts, my pencil poised over a blank page in my notebook."
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Margaret Atwood, the Prophet of Dystopia

Margaret Atwood, the Prophet of Dystopia | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
In March, Atwood came to New York City, for the annual National Book Critics Circle award ceremony, where she was being given a lifetime-achievement award. (Atwood recently remarked, on an Ask Me Anything thread on Reddit, that she is at the “Gold Watch and Goodbye” phase of her career.) The ceremony was held at the New School, and the collective mood of the assembled editors, critics, and writers—a concentration of New York’s liberal intelligentsia in its purest form—was celebratory, as such events always are, but also agitated and galvanized. That morning, President Trump had issued his first federal budget plan, and he had proposed eliminating the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, as well as ending funding for public broadcasting, and closing agencies devoted to social welfare and environmental oversight. The crowd felt like bruised defenders of a civilization that they hadn’t realized was susceptible to attack.

Trump’s agenda was criticized by many of the award recipients. Michelle Dean, a young Canadian writer who won the association’s annual prize for excellence in reviewing, declared, “The struggle we presently find ourselves in is not a mistake, and not a fluke. . . . It crept into our lives while we were napping. Power sometimes works that way, but I still wish we hadn’t missed it.” Lately, Dean added, she’d been rereading “The Handmaid’s Tale” for the first time since high school: “There are so few books like that being published right now. The application of literary intelligence to this question of power—it’s kind of out of style. And many writers just seem more interested in exploring the self.”

Two days before Trump’s Inauguration, Atwood had published an essay in The Nation, in which she questioned the generalities sometimes made by left-leaning intellectuals about the role of the artist in public life. “Artists are always being lectured on their moral duty, a fate other professionals—dentists, for example—generally avoid,” she observed. “There’s nothing inherently sacred about films and pictures and writers and books. ‘Mein Kampf’ was a book.” In fact, she said, writers and other artists are particularly prone to capitulating to authoritarian pressure; the isolation inherent in the craft makes them psychologically vulnerable. “The pen is mightier than the sword, but only in retrospect,” she wrote. “At the time of combat, those with the swords generally win.”

At the New School, when Atwood, wearing a long black dress with a patterned black shawl draped around her shoulders, was summoned to the stage, she took a cheekier tack than she had taken in the Nation essay. “I’m very, very, very happy to be here, because they let me across the border,” she said, her voice low and deliberate. Atwood characterized literary criticism as a thankless task. “Authors are sensitive beings,” she observed, to titters of amusement. “You, therefore, know that all positive adjectives applied to them will be forgotten, yet anything even faintly smacking of imperfection in their work will rankle until the end of time.” An author whom she had reviewed once berated her use of the adjective “accomplished,” she recalled. “ ‘Don’t you know that “accomplished” is an insult?’ ” she deadpanned. “I didn’t know.”

Then her remarks took an exhortatory turn. “Why do I do such a painful task?” she said. “For the same reason I give blood. We must all do our part, because if nobody contributes to this worthy enterprise then there won’t be any, just when it’s most needed.” Now is one of those times, she warned: “Never has American democracy felt so challenged.” The necessary conditions for dictatorship, Atwood noted, include the shutting down of independent media, which mutes the expression of contrary or subversive opinions; writers form part of the fragile barrier standing between authoritarian control and open democracy. “There are still places on this planet where to be caught reading you, or even me, would incur a severe penalty,” Atwood said. “I hope there will soon be fewer such places.” Her voice dropped to a stage whisper: “I am not holding my breath.”

In the meantime, she thanked the book critics, though even her gratitude carried a note of subversion. “I will cherish this lifetime-achievement award from you, though, like all sublunar blessings, it is a mixed one,” she said. “Why do I only get one lifetime? Where did this lifetime go?”
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If you’ve been ignoring the live stream of April the pregnant giraffe, now’s the time to tune in

If you’ve been ignoring the live stream of April the pregnant giraffe, now’s the time to tune in | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
“We are there. We are close. All signs are go,” Animal Adventure Park owner Jordan Patch said of the world's most famous pregnant giraffe.
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Public Broadcasters Fear ‘Collapse’ if U.S. Drops Support

Public Broadcasters Fear ‘Collapse’ if U.S. Drops Support | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Public radio and television broadcasters are girding for battle after the Trump administration proposed a drastic cutback that they have long dreaded: the defunding of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

The potential elimination of about $445 million in annual funding, which helps local TV and radio stations subscribe to NPR and Public Broadcasting Service programming, could be devastating for affiliates in smaller markets that already operate on a shoestring budget.

Patricia Harrison, the corporation’s president, warned in a statement on Thursday that the Trump budget proposal, if enacted, could cause “the collapse of the public media system itself.”
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Right and Left on Trump’s DACA Decision

Right and Left on Trump’s DACA Decision | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Joel B. Pollack in Breitbart:

“As frustrating as that may be to those who want to see DACA totally wiped off the books, and every one of its beneficiaries given a one-way bus ticket across the border, letting Congress decide what to do about the ‘Dreamers’ is exactly what ought to happen.”

Mr. Pollack believes that President Trump has made the right decision by putting the responsibility, and the pressure, on the shoulders of Congress. There are reasons, he writes, for both “amnesty opposers” and supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, to rejoice at this development. Those who oppose the measure “can take heart from the fact that this Congress seems incapable of passing anything at all.” And those who want to keep DACA “know they only need a few G.O.P. votes” to extend the program. Read more »
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Silicon Valley Courts Brand-Name Teachers, Raising Ethics Issues

Silicon Valley Courts Brand-Name Teachers, Raising Ethics Issues | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
MAPLETON, N.D. — One of the tech-savviest teachers in the United States teaches third grade here at Mapleton Elementary, a public school with about 100 students in the sparsely populated plains west of Fargo.

Her name is Kayla Delzer. Her third graders adore her. She teaches them to post daily on the class Twitter and Instagram accounts she set up. She remodeled her classroom based on Starbucks. And she uses apps like Seesaw, a student portfolio platform where teachers and parents may view and comment on a child’s schoolwork.

Ms. Delzer also has a second calling. She is a schoolteacher with her own brand, Top Dog Teaching. Education start-ups like Seesaw give her their premium classroom technology as well as swag like T-shirts or freebies for the teachers who attend her workshops. She agrees to use their products in her classroom and give the companies feedback. And she recommends their wares to thousands of teachers who follow her on social media.

“I will embed it in my brand every day,” Ms. Delzer said of Seesaw. “I get to make it better.”

Ms. Delzer is a member of a growing tribe of teacher influencers, many of whom promote classroom technology. They attract notice through their blogs, social media accounts and conference talks. And they are cultivated not only by start-ups like Seesaw, but by giants like Amazon, Apple, Google and Microsoft, to influence which tools are used to teach American schoolchildren.
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Why Kids Shouldn’t Sit Still in Class

Why Kids Shouldn’t Sit Still in Class | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
“We fall into this trap that if kids are at their desks with their heads down and are silent and writing, we think they are learning,” Mr. Gatens added. “But what we have found is that the active time used to energize your brain makes all those still moments better,” or more productive.

A 2013 report from the Institute of Medicine concluded that children who are more active “show greater attention, have faster cognitive processing speed and perform better on standardized academic tests than children who are less active.” And a study released in January by Lund University in Sweden shows that students, especially boys, who had daily physical education, did better in school.

“Daily physical activity is an opportunity for the average school to become a high-performing school,” said Jesper Fritz, a doctoral student at Lund University and physician at the Skane University Hospital in Malmo who was the study’s lead author.
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A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry

A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Few middle schoolers are as clued in to their mathematical strengths and weakness as Moheeb Kaied. Now a seventh grader at Brooklyn’s Middle School 442, he can easily rattle off his computational profile.

“Let’s see,” he said one morning this spring. “I can find the area and perimeter of a polygon. I can solve mathematical and real-world problems using a coordinate plane. I still need to get better at dividing multiple-digit numbers, which means I should probably practice that more.”

Moheeb is part of a new program that is challenging the way teachers and students think about academic accomplishments, and his school is one of hundreds that have done away with traditional letter grades inside their classrooms. At M.S. 442, students are encouraged to focus instead on mastering a set of grade-level skills, like writing a scientific hypothesis or identifying themes in a story, moving to the next set of skills when they have demonstrated that they are ready. In these schools, there is no such thing as a C or a D for a lazily written term paper. There is no failing. The only goal is to learn the material, sooner or later.
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The robots are coming, this time to rural Wisconsin

The robots are coming, this time to rural Wisconsin | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
How a couple of robots came to be the newest hires at a Wisconsin factory in search of reliable workers.
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America’s greatest eclipse is coming, and this man wants you to see it

America’s greatest eclipse is coming, and this man wants you to see it | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Besides, Kentrianakis insists, “This year I will be vindicated.” Come Aug. 21, the Internet will be flooded with videos of eclipse watchers in ecstasy. Few can witness such a spectacle and not be moved.

“It unlocks you,” he says. “I don’t know why. It is so visceral. It is the meaning of the word awe, awe-struck.” And then he’s off, waxing rhapsodic about the light, the symmetry, the electricity in the air, the feeling of cosmic insignificance. It takes him a few minutes to come back to Earth.

“I wish I could describe it in a normal fashion.” He sighs. “If I could give the magic words . . . if I say the right thing, I can get them to go.”

But all Kentrianakis can offer is his own fervor and this promise: “Wait till you see it. Then you will know.”
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Together, technology and teachers can revamp schools

Together, technology and teachers can revamp schools | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
What matters is how edtech is used. One way it can help is through bespoke instruction. Ever since Philip II of Macedon hired Aristotle to prepare his son Alexander for Greatness, rich parents have paid for tutors. Reformers from São Paulo to Stockholm think that edtech can put individual attention within reach of all pupils. American schools are embracing the model most readily. A third of pupils are in a school district that has pledged to introduce “personalised, digital learning”. The methods of groups like Summit Public Schools, whose software was written for nothing by Facebook engineers, are being copied by hundreds of schools.

In India, where about half of children leave primary school unable to read a simple text, the curriculum goes over many pupils’ heads. “Adaptive” software such as Mindspark can work out what a child knows and pose questions accordingly. A recent paper found that Indian children using Mindspark after school made some of the largest gains in maths and reading of any education study in poor countries.

The other way edtech can aid learning is by making schools more productive. In California schools are using software to overhaul the conventional model. Instead of textbooks, pupils have “playlists”, which they use to access online lessons and take tests. The software assesses children’s progress, lightening teachers’ marking load and giving them insight on their pupils. Saved teachers’ time is allocated to other tasks, such as fostering pupils’ social skills or one-on-one tuition. A study in 2015 suggested that children in early adopters of this model score better in tests than their peers at other schools.
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The Silicon Valley Billionaires Remaking America’s Schools

The Silicon Valley Billionaires Remaking America’s Schools | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"In San Francisco’s public schools, Marc Benioff, the chief executive of Salesforce, is giving middle school principals $100,000 "innovation grants” and encouraging them to behave more like start-up founders and less like bureaucrats.

In Maryland, Texas, Virginia and other states, Netflix’s chief, Reed Hastings, is championing a popular math-teaching program where Netflix-like algorithms determine which lessons students see.

And in more than 100 schools nationwide, Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief, is testing one of his latest big ideas: software that puts children in charge of their own learning, recasting their teachers as facilitators and mentors.

In the space of just a few years, technology giants have begun remaking the very nature of schooling on a vast scale, using some of the same techniques that have made their companies linchpins of the American economy. Through their philanthropy, they are influencing the subjects that schools teach, the classroom tools that teachers choose and fundamental approaches to learning.


The involvement by some of the wealthiest and most influential titans of the 21st century amounts to a singular experiment in education, with millions of students serving as de facto beta testers for their ideas. Some tech leaders believe that applying an engineering mind-set can improve just about any system, and that their business acumen qualifies them to rethink American education. 


 “They are experimenting collectively and individually in what kinds of models can produce better results,” said Emmett D. Carson, chief executive of Silicon Valley Community Foundation, which manages donor funds for Mr. Hastings, Mr. Zuckerberg and others. “Given the changes in innovation that are underway with artificial intelligence and automation, we need to try everything we can to find which pathways work.” 


But the philanthropic efforts are taking hold so rapidly that there has been little public scrutiny."

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Mitch Landrieu’s Speech on the Removal of Confederate Monuments in New Orleans

"The soul of our beloved City is deeply rooted in a history that has evolved over thousands of years; rooted in a diverse people who have been here together every step of the way — for both good and for ill. It is a history that holds in its heart the stories of Native Americans — the Choctaw, Houma Nation, the Chitimacha. Of Hernando De Soto, Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, the Acadians, the Islenos, the enslaved people from Senegambia, Free People of Colorix, the Haitians, the Germans, both the empires of France and Spain. The Italians, the Irish, the Cubans, the south and central Americans, the Vietnamese and so many more.

You see — New Orleans is truly a city of many nations, a melting pot, a bubbling caldron of many cultures. There is no other place quite like it in the world that so eloquently exemplifies the uniquely American motto: e pluribus unum — out of many we are one. But there are also other truths about our city that we must confront. New Orleans was America’s largest slave market: a port where hundreds of thousands of souls were bought, sold and shipped up the Mississippi River to lives of forced labor of misery of rape, of torture. America was the place where nearly 4000 of our fellow citizens were lynched, 540 alone in Louisiana; where the courts enshrined ‘separate but equal’; where Freedom riders coming to New Orleans were beaten to a bloody pulp. So when people say to me that the monuments in question are history, well what I just described is real history as well, and it is the searing truth.

And it immediately begs the questions, why there are no slave ship monuments, no prominent markers on public land to remember the lynchings or the slave blocks; nothing to remember this long chapter of our lives; the pain, the sacrifice, the shame... all of it happening on the soil of New Orleans. So for those self-appointed defenders of history and the monuments, they are eerily silent on what amounts to this historical malfeasance, a lie by omission. There is a difference between remembrance of history and reverence of it.

For America and New Orleans, it has been a long, winding road, marked by great tragedy and great triumph. But we cannot be afraid of our truth. As President George W. Bush said at the dedication ceremony for the National Museum of African American History & Culture, “A great nation does not hide its history. It faces its flaws and corrects them.” So today I want to speak about why we chose to remove these four monuments to the Lost Cause of the Confederacy, but also how and why this process can move us towards healing and understanding of each other. So, let’s start with the facts.

The historic record is clear, the Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, and P.G.T. Beauregard statues were not erected just to honor these men, but as part of the movement which became known as The Cult of the Lost Cause. This ‘cult’ had one goal — through monuments and through other means — to rewrite history to hide the truth, which is that the Confederacy was on the wrong side of humanity. First erected over 166 years after the founding of our city and 19 years after the end of the Civil War, the monuments that we took down were meant to rebrand the history of our city and the ideals of a defeated Confederacy. It is self-evident that these men did not fight for the United States of America, They fought against it. They may have been warriors, but in this cause they were not patriots. These statues are not just stone and metal. They are not just innocent remembrances of a benign history. These monuments purposefully celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy; ignoring the death, ignoring the enslavement, and the terror that it actually stood for."

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DeVos Halts Obama-Era Plan to Revamp Student Loan Management

DeVos Halts Obama-Era Plan to Revamp Student Loan Management | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
But critics of Ms. DeVos’s move this week are especially concerned about a particular piece of guidance from the Obama administration she struck down: that the Education Department should place great weight on a company’s track record when selecting student loan vendors, and should steer away from companies with histories of shoddy service or other problems.

Essentially, that puts Navient — the nation’s largest federal student loan servicer, which faces a spate of regulatory and legal problems related to its business practices — on stronger footing than it had been in bidding for agency contracts.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau responded to Ms. DeVos’s memo with a pointed note saying that borrowers “should be able to repay their debt without having to deal with illegal loan servicing practices.”

If the department does go forward with a single portal, Ms. DeVos’s memo seems to improve Navient’s shot at winning the bid, according to procurement experts.

In one of the memos rejected by Ms. DeVos, her predecessor as education secretary, John B. King Jr., said that a company’s past performance should be “the most important noncost factor.” Analysts interpreted that as a signal that Navient’s track record would hamper its bid.

With those priorities now scrapped, the company is back in the running, said Rohit Chopra, a former student loan ombudsman with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau who also briefly worked for the Education Department.

Mr. Tarkan of Compass Point agreed. He previously considered the joint bid of Nelnet and Great Lakes the front-runner, but Navient’s size makes it a very strong competitor — once past performance is played down.

For students, the decision is about more than just what company name appears on their monthly statement. The loan servicer has tremendous power to guide them through repayment options. Some plans stretch payment periods out for as long as 30 years, and others help qualifying students get a portion of their debt forgiven. Strategic use of those paths can trim — or inflate — the sum that a student ultimately pays by tens of thousands of dollars.
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Panicked Borrowers, and the Education Department’s Unsettling Silence

Panicked Borrowers, and the Education Department’s Unsettling Silence | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"It was bad enough late last month when the Education Department, in a legal filing, informed the nation’s public servants that they shouldn’t trust its administrator’s word about whether their student loans qualify for its debt forgiveness program. • But the panic among borrowers that the newfound uncertainty unleashed helps illuminate an additional problem with the public service loan forgiveness program: Many people who believe that they qualify — and entered graduate school, borrowed piles of money and chose employers accordingly — may not realize that they are not making qualifying payments or that certain loans are not eligible for forgiveness. • The program, which began in 2007, was enacted with what was supposed to be a clear-cut proposition: People who worked for 10 years in public service jobs and made regular payments would have the remainder of their federal student loans forgiven. A wide variety of jobs were supposed to qualify, from nonprofit work to teaching in a public school or practicing medicine at a public hospital. • But now, 10 years later, the legal filing has sown all manner of confusion — which itself comes in the wake of a disheartening amount of misdirection given to borrowers. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau receives plenty of complaints about loan servicers offering incorrect information. And well-meaning employers may also pass along bad advice."
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Books Can Take You Places Donald Trump Doesn’t Want You to Go

Books Can Take You Places Donald Trump Doesn’t Want You to Go | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
London — Whenever I was encouraged by my elders to pick up a book, I was often told, “Read so as to know the world.” And it is true; books have invited me into different countries, states of mind, social conditions and historical epochs; they have offered me a place at the most unusual gatherings.

I have had access to private rooms, overheard exquisite conversations and been able to observe subtle changes in another person’s inner life. Books have shown me horror and beauty. All this is true.

But the most magical moments in reading occur not when I encounter something unknown but when I happen upon myself, when I read a sentence that perfectly describes something I have known or felt all along. I am reminded then that I am really no different from anyone else.

Perhaps that is the secret motive behind every library: to stumble upon ourselves in the lives and lands and tongues of others. And the more foreign the setting, the more poignant the event seems. For a strange thing occurs then: A distance widens and then it is crossed.
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