Learning, Teachin...
Follow
Find tag "Research"
12.5K views | +0 today
Learning, Teaching & Leading Today
Beyond Time ~ Space ~ Place
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

Flipping Your Classroom - Doug Holton - Resources

Flipping Your Classroom - Doug Holton - Resources | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Technological resources for enhancing pedagogy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

14 Free Resources for Primary Source Documents

14 Free Resources for Primary Source Documents | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
14 Free Resources for Primary Source Documents ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning http://t.co/baSVerjHkC

Via Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

Create Custom Ebook Encyclopaedias From Wikipedia

Create Custom Ebook Encyclopaedias From Wikipedia | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

It's not a difficult process: click the "Create a book" link located in Wikipedia's left sidebar, collate the articles you want to include (you can include complete categories, which makes great sense), and then export it as a PDF or EPUB file. There's a little video tutorial you can watch if you need more help but don't worry: it's really easy.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from A New Society, a new education!
Scoop.it!

An Index of Educational Technology Journals

An Index of Educational Technology Journals | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Program handouts for the Educational Technology Journals workshop shared by the Faculty Development and Instructional Design Center at Northern Illinois University (List of Educational Technology Journals.


Via Susan Bainbridge, Rui Guimarães Lima, juandoming
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

Social Media Basics for Educators | The New Media Consortium

Social Media Basics for Educators | The New Media Consortium | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Via Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

The people with no lobby in Washington

"In national politics, the influence of money is a perennial concern, and the 2012 election cycle has involved a particular frenzy of campaign spending. But to focus exclusively on election spending is to overlook the staggering sums—more than $3 billion every year since 2008—that are devoted to old-fashioned lobbying.

To an outsider, the variety of organizations that seek influence in Washington can be startling. There is the Window Covering Manufacturers Association, the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers, and the Handcrafted Soapmakers Guild. There is a lobby for duck hunters and one for motorcyclists. The astonishing diversity of organizations that lobby might give the impression that they represent the full spectrum of American life, from pro-business groups like the Chamber of Commerce to unions like the AFL-CIO, and from right to left—with plenty of groups, like the National Safety Council, that have no obvious ideological coloration.

But to conclude from this diversity that all Americans have at least some kind of organization looking out for them would be wrong. In decades of researching American political lobbies, we have found that there are huge gaps in who is represented. And, as an old Washington saying goes, 'If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu.'"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

Starving the Future

"If you compare investments made in education by the United States with initiatives in China and India, Americans have reason to be afraid, very afraid."

"Now compare that with the report’s findings on China. It estimates that “by 2030, China will have 200 million college graduates — more than the entire U.S. work force,” and points out that by 2020 China plans to:

• Enroll 40 million children in preschool, a 50 percent increase from today.

• Provide 70 percent of children in China with three years of preschool.

• Graduate 95 percent of Chinese youths through nine years of compulsory education (that’s 165 million students, more than the U.S. labor force).

• Ensure that no child drops out of school for financial reasons.

• More than double enrollment in higher education.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

The middle class falls further behind

The middle class falls further behind | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"The mean net worth (assets, such as a home or retirement account, minus debt) of middle-class families plunged 28% to $93,150 in 2010 from $129,582 in 2001. Meanwhile, the mean net worth of the upper class edged 1% higher over the course of the decade to $574,788. Fry said the upper class was better able to cushion themselves against housing losses because they are more diversified and have much of their wealth in stocks, bonds and other investments.

The middle class also took a bigger hit on the pay front. While incomes across all class levels declined for the first time since World War II, the middle class saw the biggest decline, with a median income for a four person household declining to roughly $70,000 in 2010 from about $73,000 in 2001, the report said. The median income for the lower class is $23,000 and about $113,000 for the upper class. The middle class is also giving up more income to the rich. In 2010, the upper income group took in 46% of all income, up from 29% in 1970. The middle income group took in 45% of income, down significantly from 62% in 1970."
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from Teaching & Learning Resources
Scoop.it!

Matt Mills: Image recognition that triggers augmented reality | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Matt Mills and Tamara Roukaerts demonstrate Aurasma, a new augmented reality tool that can seamlessly animate the world as seen through a smartphone.

Via Pilar Pamblanco
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

'Mostly False' Claims That Affordable Care Act Cuts Medicare Program By $500 Billion

'Mostly False' Claims That Affordable Care Act Cuts Medicare Program By $500 Billion | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"A discredited claim is making a comeback following the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding most of the national health care reform law.

U.S. Rep. Jon Runyan said in a press release on Thursday that the law, formally known as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, makes cuts to Medicare.

'My constituents simply cannot afford the $500 billion in new tax increases and $500 billion in Medicare cuts required to pay for this flawed legislation, nor can our economy sustain the job-killing mandates and regulations it imposes,' Runyan, a Republican representing parts of southern New Jersey, said in a press release.

Mitt Romney, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, repeated the claim in his statement about the high court’s ruling, saying 'cuts Medicare - cuts Medicare by approximately $500 billion dollars.'

Both claims distort the truth, as our PolitiFact colleagues have found many times."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

A Scientist's 20-Year Quest To Defeat Dengue Fever

"Scott O'Neill's big idea to rid the world of dengue is both clever and complex: He wants to infect mosquitoes with bacteria so they can't carry the virus that causes the disease."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

If Students Are Digital Natives Why Don't They Like Our E-learning?

If Students Are Digital Natives Why Don't They Like Our E-learning? | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"A new report has been published by Toronto-based Higher Education Strategy Associates with the superb title The State of E-Learning in Canadian Universities, 2011: If Students Are Digital Natives, Why Don’t They Like E-Learning?It's a study of Canadian students' attitudes to e-learning and finds, not surprisingly that today's students are not so enthusiastic towards universities' net-based courses as we would expect."

 

"... the report ends with some very relevant thoughts. Maybe students' lukewarm attitude to e-learning is because the e-learning on offer is simply not very compelling or well designed? What if the e-learning of today is simply a pale electronic version of traditional teaching and therefore is always compared to the "real thing." Maybe we haven't actually changed anything, we've just put the classroom on the net without much thought of why we might want to do that.

 

'Another way to read the data is simply that the e-learning resources being deployed in Canadian universities aren’t of high enough quality to really engage a very digitally-savvy student population. Perhaps with more investment not just in the user interface but in the integration of in-person and online learning, e-learning resources can move from being a technology that helps students find alternatives to being in class to a technology that actually enhances and is additive to their inclass experience.'"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

African American Students Suspended and Expelled 2 to 5 Times as Often as Whites

Data suggest African American students are two to five times more likely to get suspended or expelled as their white peers and that the gap exists across the region's urban, suburban and rural school districts..."

"The problems extend beyond the Washington area to school districts across the country and are among a host of concerns about school discipline that sparked a joint effort by the U.S. Justice and Education departments in July to look into reforms.

Experts say disparities appear to have complex causes. A disproportionate number of black students live below the poverty line or with a single parent, factors that affect disciplinary patterns. But experts say those factors do not fully explain racial differences in suspensions. Other contributing factors could include unintended bias, unequal access to highly effective teachers and differences in school leadership styles."
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from UDL - Universal Design for Learning
Scoop.it!

A Research Reader in Universal Design for Learning

A Research Reader in Universal Design for Learning | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"Kathleen McClaskey's insight:

A much anticipateed book on UDL research is now available.

 

'This book considers the major research areas that underlie UDL and call out for further exploration in the years ahead. Each of the book’s six chapters includes a groundbreaking article that is centrally related to the larger UDL project, along with reflections on that article by contemporary researchers. As David H. Rose notes in his afterword, "the authors of this collection have set out to do more than revitalize and illuminate the foundations of UDL. They have set out also to prepare the field—to set the context—for the kind of research that needs to come now.'"


Via Kathleen McClaskey
more...
Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:37 AM

A much anticipateed book on UDL research is now available.

 

"This book considers the major research areas that underlie UDL and call out for further exploration in the years ahead. Each of the book’s six chapters includes a groundbreaking article that is centrally related to the larger UDL project, along with reflections on that article by contemporary researchers. As David H. Rose notes in his afterword, "the authors of this collection have set out to do more than revitalize and illuminate the foundations of UDL. They have set out also to prepare the field—to set the context—for the kind of research that needs to come now.""

Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

Childhood Poverty: Shame of the Nation

Childhood Poverty: Shame of the Nation | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"I [Jason Flom] just attended a brief webinar with the Carsey Institute on their recent brief that identifies patterns in childhood poverty using data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey.

 

The brief is sobering to say the least. In short, despite the recession being “over,” poverty rates among children continue to rise, most dramatically in urban areas, among the unemployed (those actively looking for work), and in families of color.

 

That this information is not front and center in our current presidential campaign is shocking, horrifying, and saddening. When nearly 1/4 of our children are living below the poverty line, we have a moral obligation to act, even if they are, by definition a part of the 47%. The closest we come to talking about it, and I mean REALLY talking about it, is to insist teachers improve all students’ “achievement.”"

more...
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from Library Web 2.0 skills
Scoop.it!

10 Free Tools for Everyday Research - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - @soxnevad

10 Free Tools for Everyday Research - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - @soxnevad | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Why do so many students choose Wikipedia when asked to find information on the Internet? I believe the answer is that Wikipedia is like the McDonalds of the Internet, you can always find it and you know what you’re going to get.

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

Google Maps shows how we spent summer 2012

Google Maps shows how we spent summer 2012 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"In the blink of an eye, summer is coming to an end. It feels like it was just yesterday that I was planning out all my summer activities as I eagerly awaited the start of long, sunny days and warm nights.

 

Before we approach the official end of summer on September 21, our Google Maps team thought it’d be fun to see how those of us in the Northern Hemisphere have spent the dog days. To do this, we reviewed the summer search activity on maps.google.com in several countries between the end of May and the beginning of September. Within each country, a look at some of the top-rising searches and the often-searched landmarks on Google Maps gives us a sense of how people around the world spent their summers."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

Early Music Lessons Have Longtime Benefits

Early Music Lessons Have Longtime Benefits | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"When children learn to play a musical instrument, they strengthen a range of auditory skills. Recent studies suggest that these benefits extend all through life."
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from Shifting Learning
Scoop.it!

Beyond Googling: Structuring Inquiry

Beyond Googling: Building Conditions for Structured Inquiry Chris LehmannScience Leadership Academy @chrislehmann...


Via David Truss
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

Tags to reveal hairy ant secrets

Tags to reveal hairy ant secrets | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Researchers are planning to fit tiny tags to a protected species of ant in order to gain an insight into the insects' behaviour.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from Leadership Think Tank
Scoop.it!

Back to school: How parent involvement affects student achievement (At a glance)

Do all the PTA meetings, take-home flyers and Back to School nights actually generate increases in student achievement? (RT @smconstantino: Gr8 research summary on effects of fam eng on achievement.
Via Aki Puustinen
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from 21st Century Information Fluency
Scoop.it!

Evaluating Internet Research Sources

Evaluating Internet Research Sources | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Guidelines for evaluating Internet sources, including a checklist to help assure credibility, accuracy, reasonableness, and supported claims.

 

"'The central work of life is interpretation.' --Proverb

 

Introduction: The Diversity of Information

 

Information is a Commodity Available in Many Flavors


Think about the magazine section in your local grocery store. If you reach out with your eyes closed and grab the first magazine you touch, you are about as likely to get a supermarket tabloid as you are a respected journal (actually more likely, since many respected journals don't fare well in grocery stores). Now imagine that your grocer is so accommodating that he lets anyone in town print up a magazine and put it in the magazine section. Now if you reach out blindly, you might get the Elvis Lives with Aliens Gazette just as easily as Atlantic Monthly or Time.


Welcome to the Internet. As I hope my analogy makes clear, there is an extremely wide variety of material on the Internet, ranging in its accuracy, reliability, and value. Unlike most traditional information media (books, magazines, organizational documents), no one has to approve the content before it is made public. It's your job as a searcher, then, to evaluate what you locate, in order to determine whether it suits your needs."


Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis Richards from IT & education
Scoop.it!

Create an eBook from Online Articles

Create an eBook from Online Articles | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

This is a great way to create eBooks from your own online content or from any content you find online.
You can create and share reading lists for courses. Create your own eBooks of yours or your students' stories. Create your own collection of your favourite articles. Collect a reading list of articles to read when you don't have an Internet connection. Webpages that you capture in this way can be much easier to read and of course you have all the eBook's mark up and note taking functions which will store all your annotations on the eBooks you create.


Via Nik Peachey, Let's Learn IT
more...
BookChook's curator insight, November 13, 2013 3:59 PM

Readlist enables sharing and embedding your own online content - great way to bundle a collection of your blog posts. 

Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

Memory Test: A History Of U.S. Citizenship Education and Examination

"Background/Context: While much has been written about the history of immigration and naturalization in the United States, few scholars have looked at the history of citizenship education and testing. The small body of literature on the subject has primarily focused on World War I-era Americanization efforts and, as such, has excluded later periods. Further, while it has looked at citizenship education programs, it has usually done so without considering the context of the high stakes exam that immigrants must pass in order to become citizens.

Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: Each year, tens of thousands of would-be American citizens set out to conquer the U.S. citizenship test. To do so, they must be prepared to answer 10 fact-oriented questions about American government, history, and geography selected by a naturalization examiner from a master list of 100. A score of six correct answers earns citizenship. Consequently, aspiring citizens memorize the number of Amendments to the Constitution, the branches of government, the names of three of the original American colonies, and the location of the Statue of Liberty. Most immigrants pass.

This article seeks to understand the roots of the memory test that currently serves as America’s gauge of fitness for citizenship. In looking back over 100 years of history, it seeks to explore how a once highly pluralistic approach to education and an anxiety-producing system of testing conducted by naturalization courts became what we know today. By asking how we got here, it also implicitly asks whether we want to maintain this status quo or seek out change."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis Richards
Scoop.it!

Video Lecture: Why Students Don't Learn What We Think We Teach

Video Lecture: Why Students Don't Learn What We Think We Teach | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

Duke is captivating, and he makes a clear argument that students don't learn what we think we teach because they're too busy learning what we're actually teaching, which is, often, that precision is more important than understanding and that grades matter. The solution, he argues, is to teach, over and over, the things that we actually want our students to remember after the semester is over. And, that we should not defer learning about "The Good Stuff" until after they've suffered through boring prerequisites. Instead, we should teach the good stuff first and teach what we really enjoy.

 

via Darren Kuropatwa: http://goo.gl/y68VA

more...
No comment yet.