Learning how to Use Google Drive in the Science Classroom
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Rescooped by Lisa Jameson from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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The best science apps for kids: Back to School Tech Guide 2013

The best science apps for kids: Back to School Tech Guide 2013 | Learning how to Use Google Drive in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
There's something for kids of any age in this well-curated roundup of some of the very best science apps for kids. May they help spark a lifelong love of science, from the inner body to the far reaches of outer space.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Alice Rolfe's curator insight, September 9, 2013 11:56 PM

Woohoo! more great apps for kids at school

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What's In Your Pee? | Popular Science

What's In Your Pee? | Popular Science | Learning how to Use Google Drive in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
It took seven years and 20 researchers, but a team at the University of Alberta have finally, using all available state-of-the-art equipment, figured out.
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Rescooped by Lisa Jameson from Amazing Science
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Dallol - The World's Weirdest Volcanic Crater

Dallol - The World's Weirdest Volcanic Crater | Learning how to Use Google Drive in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

In the North East of Ethiopia lies the Danokil Desert.  At its heart is a volcanic crater, Dallol, little known and seldom visited but quite extraordinary.  

Surrounding the volcano are acidic hot springs, mountains of sulphur, pillars of salt, small gas geysers and pools of acid isolated by salt ridges. It makes for one of the most bizarre landscapes on planet Earth.

 

Dallol is effectively a volcanic explosion crater. It was formed when basaltic magma intruded in to salt deposits and water. This subsequently caused a huge phreatic eruption.  The rising magma made contact with the ground water. As magma is so extremely hot the water evaporated immediately.  The result was a huge explosion of rock, ash, water and steam – not to mention volcanic bombs (molten rock which cools and solidifies before it hits the ground).

 

The volcano last erupted in 1926 and gained some attention then but it had been known to Europeans for about two hundred years. Yet the site remained effectively unknown to most until recently – simply because of the hostile nature of the environment, the almost unbearable heat of the area and the very present danger from toxic fumes.

 

The volcano is surrounded by a huge saline area, the edges of which are studded with a multitude of fairy chimneys where gases have broken through. The sulphuric hot springs bubble at boiling point. The salt of the Danokil Depression, 136.8 meters below sea level, mixes with volcanic minerals such as sulfur, to create terraces and unique, other worldly concretions. Geysers and chimneys adorn the site throughout.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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