Learning & Geography
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Learning & Geography
Various links from a university instructor in Winnipeg.
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Welcome To Geography!

"Lets start off the new school year in style! This is a re-imagining of an older resource designed to introduce the subject to new students in a highly visual manner.  Feel free to use & share it."


Via Seth Dixon
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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 24, 2014 11:59 PM

Introducción a la Geografía.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:29 PM

APHG-Intro

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 3, 2014 6:10 PM

This is a great introduction to the subject of Geography. Covering both the content, Fieldwork and investigation and teh tools and skills of the subject.

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18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes

18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
Maps are hard. Not that hard, though.

Via Seth Dixon
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 2014 11:33 AM

Unit 1 Geography Nature and Perspective. These people need perspective and a Geography course or two.

Scott Langston's curator insight, September 18, 2014 8:05 PM

I like the 'not that hard, though' tag.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 28, 2015 1:07 PM

Why study geography?

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Home | Beat Nation – Hip Hop as Indigenous Culture

Home | Beat Nation – Hip Hop as Indigenous Culture | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it

Via Pauliina Harjula
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Pauliina Harjula's curator insight, March 19, 2014 1:00 PM

Beat Nation is a web site project created by staff members from Grunt Gallery,Vancouver, an art gallery for disadvantaged artists. The web site introduces "Hip Hop as Indigenous culture" and argues that the popularity of Hip Hop among Aboriginal youth does not endanger the sustenance of traditional culture but, quite the opposite, embraces the traditional within the development and production of Aboriginal Hip Hop culture.

Aboriginal control over the modern Aboriginal image.

Ann Marie Murnaghan's comment, April 25, 2014 5:39 PM
Awesome portal!
Rescooped by Ann Marie Murnaghan from Children and Nature: School Gardens
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The Edible Schoolyard Project

The Edible Schoolyard Project | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
The mission of the Edible Schoolyard Project is to build and share an edible education curriculum for kindergarten through high school. Our vision is for gardens and kitchens to become interactive classrooms for academic subjects, and for every student to have a free, nutritious, organic lunch. If this program is integrated into schools, the curriculum could transform the health and values of every child in America.

Via Teresa Janelle
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Teresa Janelle's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:05 PM

The Edible Schoolyard Project was founded by Alice Waters and is the American counterpart to Canada's School Garden Network. This landing pad for the project includes information about all the school gardens which have joined the project, information on talks, news related to American school gardens, and resources to help teachers teach and implement garden-based curriculum in their schools. It also contains a discussion forum where garden implementers can discuss issues in real-time, and a link to US Berkeley's Edible Education Lecture Series (http://vimeo.com/album/2192316). The lecture series is one of the only resources quickly available on this site which discusses the philosophy and benefits of school gardens in any sort of specific way. Perhaps understandably, given the movement's purpose and mission, there is no critique present about potential problems with the philosophy or implementation of school gardens.

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Cultivating Failure

Cultivating Failure | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
How school gardens are cheating our most vulnerable students

Via Teresa Janelle
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Teresa Janelle's curator insight, April 14, 2014 1:21 PM

In this scathing critique of school gardens, Caitlin Flanagan of "The Atlantic" accurately calls the gardens "a giant experiment, one that is predicated on a set of assumptions that are largely unproved, even unexamined". She suggests that school gardens are "cheating our most vulnerable students": that they lower standards and that is why they increase grades; that they subject children to menial labour that their parents may well have moved to the United States to avoid. Using schools to push forward social agendas, she argues, is unacceptable. Flanagan says that "although garden-based curricula are advanced as a means of redressing a wide spectrum of poverty’s ills, the animating spirit behind them is impossible to separate from the haute-bourgeois predilections of the Alice Waters fan club". Are school gardens only helpful for the privileged? How does Flanagan reconcile her claim with the fact that many of the poorest children in North America are profoundly urban; with the data that suggest they have no connection to farming or land, let alone ability to buy or recognize fresh food in the grocery store? Her critique is thought-provoking and requires us to examine the assumptions we make about the benefits of school gardens, as well as reminding us that we need data, not just idealism, to design effective and just schoolcurriculums. This polemical article has drawn several defenses from the blogging world, a sampling of which are shared on this page.

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These Are Photos Of Childrens Bedrooms. But They Represent Something Much, Much More.

These Are Photos Of Childrens Bedrooms. But They Represent Something Much, Much More. | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
A picture is worth a thousand words. When you see this you'll know why.

Via Leah Cairns
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Leah Cairns's curator insight, March 30, 2014 4:15 PM

A child's bedroom is a very important space in their home. It can be said that a child's bedroom is the place where a child experiences the most privacy and can express their self identity. Every child around the world has a different childhood, and because of issues such as poverty, some children might not even have their own bedroom, or a space to call their own. This web page is an excellent preview of the book "Where Children Sleep" by James Mollison, where he looks at the bedrooms of children all around the world, in all different kinds of circumstances. The pictures of these children's bedroom are truly worth a thousand words. 

Ann Marie Murnaghan's comment, April 25, 2014 4:24 PM
Wow, this is a moving and intimate insight into children's worlds around the world!
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The Overprotected Kid

The Overprotected Kid | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
A preoccupation with safety has stripped childhood of independence, risk taking, and discovery—without making it safer. A new kind of playground points to a better solution.
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Ukraine maps chart Crimea's troubled past

Ukraine maps chart Crimea's troubled past | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
Maps held at the British Library help chart Crimea's troubled past (Impressive collection of #historical #maps trace #Crimea's troubled past #Geography #historyteacher #sschat http://t.co/H4FPRB7Ygx)...
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Feeding Nine Billion | Working Towards A World With Food

Feeding Nine Billion | Working Towards A World With Food | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
Ann Marie Murnaghan's insight:

Really nice videos here!

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"Natural" Foods?

"The False Advertising Industry reveals the shocking truth about what is allowed in 'Natural' food. Only the USDA Organic Seal guarantees your food contains no Genetically Modified Organisms, no toxic pesticides, and no growth hormones or antibiotics."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2014 3:22 PM

This funny video shows how meaningless the word "natural" is when it is only used as a buzzword or slogan.  Many food companies are trying to show their "natural" roots these days--some with a new label and others are trying to legitimately clean up their production line.  In fact, McDonald's has gone to great lengths to show their costumers where the food is coming from and to personalize the food producers to alleviate their fears.  They have created a Track my Maccas iPhone App which used several geospatial technologies to explore the commodity chain of McDonalds items (keep in mind that this is the companies own promotional tool). 


Tags: agriculture, GMOs, food production, mapping, geospatial.

Katie's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:54 AM

This article is about the false advertising of food. I think when you buy a food that it should have a label saying it includes GMOs just so you are aware. This has to do with the Green Revolution, because thats when GMOs were created.

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School ditches rules and loses bullies

School ditches rules and loses bullies | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
Ripping up the playground rulebook is having incredible effects at an Auckland school.
Ann Marie Murnaghan's insight:

Ditches rules (and has fun stuff to do....)

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CHILD RESEARCHERS

CHILD RESEARCHERS | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it

WHAT IF CHILDREN’S WORLD VIEWS WERE THE STARTING POINT FOR CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN SANKT KJELDS?


Via Trevor James Wideman
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Trevor James Wideman's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:23 AM

"Child Researchers" is a component of the Living Copenhagen project, an critical art and design based intervention designed to question the renewal and revitalization of Copenhagen's 'Sankt Kjelds' neighbourhood. In this project, children were asked to particpate in a mapping workshop that provided an alternative development scheme for a local park. This is the first of a few examples that I have found that use children's engagement to rediesign green space, however, there are very few where kids reimagine entire neighbourhoods. Any thoughts on why that might be?

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


Via Seth Dixon
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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:06 PM

This is also a good introductory video for the Religion unit.  It will at least give students a general overview of the major world religions as a baseline of information to reference when diving deeper into the unit content.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 10:10 AM

unit 3

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City Beautiful - Part 1: Great Expectations

WINNIPEG, April, 1911: Michael Hrushka had $42 in his pocket when the train pulled up to the Canadian Pacific Railroad Station on Higgins Avenue. He was 16 years old, with no waiting friends, no family and no concept of the English language.
Ann Marie Murnaghan's insight:

Excellent interactive article on the City Beautiful Movement in Canada, centering on Winnipeg!  

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First Nations youth call for five-year action plan | Toronto Star

First Nations youth call for five-year action plan  | Toronto Star | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
Aboriginal youth, in an “ultimate act of reconciliation,” are seeking an equal seat at the table to address long-standing needs, from the legacy of residential schools to corruption on reserves.

Via Pauliina Harjula
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Pauliina Harjula's curator insight, February 26, 2014 2:33 PM

Considered as being a powerful part of reconciliation act, "Feathers of Hope" is a direct and straight forward report to address the needs of the youth in process of Canadian reconciliation. What gives the report valuable, is that it has been written by the young people (Aboriginal and allies) themselves. The report is not only giving praised recommendations and rationale to the participation of Aboriginal youth in the national truth and reconciliation process, but it is in itself a manifestation of political self-empowerment of the Aboriginal youth.

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School Gardens - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

Via Teresa Janelle
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Teresa Janelle's curator insight, April 14, 2014 4:48 PM

A 17-minute-long documentary from the Library of Congress in the U.S., this video chronicles the early history of school gardens in America starting in the 1800s. At the beginning and end, it briefly outlines some of the benefits of school gardens that are commonly discussed. Although somewhat detailed and dry, the plethora of historical images, books, and posters provide a fascinating look into the origins of school gardening.

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School Garden Network

School Garden Network | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it

Via Teresa Janelle
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Teresa Janelle's curator insight, April 13, 2014 9:33 PM

This is Canada's "School Garden Network"! This practical page offers opportunities to read about schools in Canada which have implemented school gardens, as well as provides plenty of activities and curriculum resources for teachers hoping to implement gardens in their schools and classrooms.

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What is a home? - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

Via Leah Cairns
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Leah Cairns's curator insight, March 31, 2014 12:45 AM

What exactly is a home? What characteristics do children and youth believe makes a good home, or a bad home? This is a great video produced by children and youth who have received support by a program in Scotland called Shelter, on explaining what home means to them.

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TransCanada’s Keystone Pipeline’s Southern Leg to Begin Transporting Oil to U.S. Gulf Coast | EcoWatch

TransCanada’s Keystone Pipeline’s Southern Leg to Begin Transporting Oil to U.S. Gulf Coast | EcoWatch | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
Geography: TransCanada’s Keystone Pipeline’s Southern Leg to Begin Transporting Oil to U.S. http://t.co/EgFQ3ckKI9 http://t.co/6ZMUVhDgML
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Six emerging Aboriginal artists in Canada who are inspiring change

Six emerging Aboriginal artists in Canada who are inspiring change | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
Long before Idle No More, a new generation of Aboriginal artists began embracing its heritage and power in society

Via Pauliina Harjula
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Pauliina Harjula's curator insight, March 12, 2014 1:07 PM

These young artists exercise their Aboriginal agency through various art forms, from rapping and spray painting to hand crafting and film making. The theoretical concept of using body as a means of producing everyday politics, more familiar in the field of children's politics and geography, seems to apply well to slightly older youth as well. Not only do these artists decolonize the various disciplines of art, but some of them claim physical spaces (especially in urban settings) through the artistic manifestations of Indigeneity. 

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Twelve Ways We Can Make Our Cities More Child-Friendly - Spacing National

Twelve Ways We Can Make Our Cities More Child-Friendly - Spacing National | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
For far too long, many people have considered family life and urban life as being mutually exclusive. That trend is slowly reversing, as more and more parents choose to raise their kids in urban areas.
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Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor

Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
How globalization has changed the nature of urban development.

Via Seth Dixon, dilaycock
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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 3:34 AM

useful for Year 9, 10 and 11 Geography units

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:21 PM

Around the world is the same set of problems. Check the Esri  resources that are used to compare cities.

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Census 2011: Canada's foster children counted for first time

Census 2011: Canada's foster children counted for first time | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
They are among Canada's most vulnerable children and, for the first time in census history, their numbers have been counted.
Ann Marie Murnaghan's insight:
This is an important marker in census history. The lives of foster kids is a significant contributor to the well being of all children in Canada.
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Children of Jordan

Children of Jordan | Learning & Geography | Scoop.it
Discover the state of children, child in the culture, whom to contact and how to take action to realize Children's Rights in Jordan !

Via Ghassan at University of Manitoba
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Ghassan at University of Manitoba's curator insight, April 18, 2013 8:49 AM

This Organization works from almost everywhere in the Middle East, watching closely the rights of children, and children's problems in Jordan. The website demonstrates a simple way to address problems that children face in Jordan.  Basically, the most important problems are issues regarding health, education, child labor, and identity.

 

 

Ann Marie Murnaghan's comment, April 24, 2013 4:07 PM
Interesting geographical survey of children's rights!