Learning Futures
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Learning Futures
Learning Futures
Trends and forecasts for learning in a digital age
Curated by Cathy Ellis
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Why predictions about technology are always wrong | The Enlightened Economist

Why predictions about technology are always wrong | The Enlightened Economist | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
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The Google Glass generation: In our shiny new digital world are we increasingly terrified of being alone?

The Google Glass generation: In our shiny new digital world are we increasingly terrified of being alone? | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
In the past few days smartphone wars have increased, fuelled by the announcement of the Galaxy S4. (RT @TEDxSheffield: A Dark Lens? After Google's demo of Glasses at TED2013, here's @vickybeeching on the Google Glass generation..
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Sugata Mitra

Sugata Mitra | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
| TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) is where the world's leading thinkers and doers gather to share ideas worth spreading.
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Sugata Mitra: Can kids teach themselves?

http://www.ted.com Speaking at LIFT 2007, Sugata Mitra talks about his Hole in the Wall project. Young kids in this project figured out how to use a PC on th...
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The Teacher’s Visual Guide To Social Media

The Teacher’s Visual Guide To Social Media | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

Posted by Terry Heick via onlinecolleges.net

 

"What can social media do for you in your classroom? A lot, actually.

The use of social media in formal learning environments is an exciting possibility for a variety of reasons, including authenticity of learning materials, widespread availability, low cost (assuming technology to access it is in place), and other potential, including higher-level thinking possibilities, many of which we outlined in our twitter spectrum.

 

"The following visual takes a look at facebook, twitter, wordpress, pinterest, and YouTube (a topic we also covered recently)."


Via Jim Lerman, Donna Browne
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Dr. Sugata Mitra's Wiki

Dr. Sugata Mitra's Wiki | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
See on Scoop.it - Math, technology and learning
Articles, videos, books, and more!
See on sugatam.wikispaces.com (Dr. Sugata Mitra's Wiki - See on Scoop.it - Math, technology and learning Articles, videos, books, and more!
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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, Daniel Tan
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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

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Educational Leadership:Technology-Rich Learning:Flip Your Students' Learning

Educational Leadership:Technology-Rich Learning:Flip Your Students' Learning | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Daniel Tan
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Daniel Tan's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:04 AM

Flipped learning is not about how to use videos in your lessons. It's about how to best use your in-class time with students. That insight is causing educators in classrooms from kindergarten to college to reevaluate how they teach.

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The MOOC in Further Education Colleges – distraction or lever for change? | Learning Futures Lab | Cathy Ellis

"When not one, but two, Government Ministers start dropping the word ‘MOOC’ into their speeches and tweets, should those of us working in the field of Educational Technology be encouraged or worried? And, furthermore, when part of the rationale for such support is that British education is now part of the Coalition Government’s 2012 Industrial Strategy and some of the collective rhetoric comes close to a chauvinistic claim for the superiority of the British education system, then we seem to be entering into a global skirmish to put a competitive British MOOC into cyberspace."


Via Peter B. Sloep, Cathy Ellis
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, January 27, 2013 3:30 PM

This extensive and well-argued article takes an unusual stance in that it focusses on Further Education Colleges. Indeed, such a focus is badly needed as MOOCs and FE at first sight seem natural allies. And although the post is UK centric, it is well worth reading.

 

Cathy Ellis' argument consists of five points. Her first point, lack of funding on formal grounds, sounds specific to the UK, although others might recognise it. Her second is an interesting one, as it goes a long way towards explaining the success of MOOCs: "In the era of YouTube and TED, the ‘teacher as performer’ has taken root, and academics who would previously have stayed in their dusty lecture halls are now clamouring to be on stage. This has bred the era of the ‘rock star’ or ‘celebrity academic’ ...." This leads her to suggest to "Do your own TED-events and create your own YouTube channel".

 

Third, she advises against 'offshore' MOOC providers. A MOOC platform connected to the local VLE has the advantage of churning out useful data. This does not imply we should dismiss the "'industrial' scale MOOCs", they are "like an amplification of Open Educational Resources' and should be thus used, Cathy argues (4). Finally, MOOCs have done their job if their advent "mobilises leadership and policy makers to engage seriously with Educational Technology and support the sector in providing the conditions for it to flourish."

 

What the article argues for then, is to mainstream MOOCs: We use the technology to inspire our own teaching, we use the 'industrial' platforms and their content as OERs. Makes sense, if the colleges in HE and FE (and elsewhere) manage to survive the MOOC swell. With the "ever growing commodification of education" - Cathy's own words - this is no certainty, as I have argued elsewhere.

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TED winner Sugata Mitra's 'Hole in the Wall' idea opens up new world for slum kids - NDTV

TED winner Sugata Mitra's 'Hole in the Wall' idea opens up new world for slum kids - NDTV | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
NDTV
TED winner Sugata Mitra's 'Hole in the Wall' idea opens up new world for slum kids
NDTV
email. TED winner Sugata Mitra's 'Hole in the Wall' idea opens up new world for.
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Educational Leadership:Technology-Rich Learning:Flip Your Students' Learning

Educational Leadership:Technology-Rich Learning:Flip Your Students' Learning | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Daniel Tan
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Daniel Tan's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:04 AM

Flipped learning is not about how to use videos in your lessons. It's about how to best use your in-class time with students. That insight is causing educators in classrooms from kindergarten to college to reevaluate how they teach.

Rescooped by Cathy Ellis from Connectivism and Networked Learning
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Communications & Society: The Nodes and Edges of Connectivism | Keith Hamon | e-Xploration

Communications & Society: The Nodes and Edges of Connectivism | Keith Hamon | e-Xploration | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
"I've just finished reading Scott Weingart's Demystifying Networks, Parts I & II, in which Mr. Weingart tries to correct the misuse of networks by humanities scholars. ... Both the Universe and our knowledge of it are network phenomena.

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Libraries evolve with the times - Boston Globe

Libraries evolve with the times - Boston Globe | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Boston Globe
Libraries evolve with the times
Boston Globe
Before leaving, he discussed how public libraries have changed over the years, how they remain relevant today, and how they are continuing to evolve in a digital age.
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The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age

In this report, Cathy Davidson and David Theo Goldberg focus on the potential for shared and interactive learning made possible by the Internet.
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Ten Technology Trends That Will Change the World in Ten Years

For more info: http://www.cisco.com/go/ibsg/innovations At Cisco Live 2011, Dave Evans, Cisco’s chief futurist and chief technologist for the Cisco Internet B
Cathy Ellis's insight:

From 2011 but still relevant.

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Research: Internet technology not fully exploited in teaching

Research: Internet technology not fully exploited in teaching | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
University educators mainly use internet technology for distributing course work. One researcher argues that educational institutions do not fully exploit the potential of online technology.
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Future Learning Short Documentary

Students are the future, but what's the future for students? To arm them with the relevant, timeless skills for our rapidly changing world, we need to revolutionize what it means to learn. Education innovators like Dr.
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40 Ways Education Technology Will Be Used In The Future - Edudemic

40 Ways Education Technology Will Be Used In The Future - Edudemic | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
What will classrooms look like in the year 2040? What will be the biggest and most popular teaching tools? A dazzling (but potentially controversial) visualization maps out what's coming to education in the future.
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ticEDUCA2012 | 2nd International Congress on ICT and Education

ticEDUCA2012 | 2nd International Congress on ICT and Education | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

2nd International Congress on ICT and Education...


Via João Greno Brogueira, Daniel Tan
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Critical Thinking Skills

Critical Thinking Skills | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

Fantastic graphic Blooms taxonomy


Via Tomasz Jankowski, Dennis T OConnor, Kathleen Cercone, Eva Buyuksimkesyan, João Greno Brogueira, Daniel Tan
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Using Social Media to Create a Personal Learning Network

A look at at what social media tools could be used to develop a personal learning network. Slides from Sue Beckingham (@suebecks)

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Online students need more face-to-face time, not less

Online students need more face-to-face time, not less | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Higher education, we’re told, is rapidly heading towards huge transformation and technological disruption.Advocates of online education promise that advances in online learning technologies – by permitting…...

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Use conversations to deliver eLearning content- and a free template

Use conversations to deliver eLearning content- and a free template | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Use conversations to deliver eLearning content- and a free template

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Daniel Tan's curator insight, March 12, 2013 9:34 PM

INteresting and innovative use of Powerpoint

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Memo to Trustees re: Thomas Friedman’s ‘Revolution Hits the Universities’ | Kris Olds -Inside Higher Ed

Memo to Trustees re: Thomas Friedman’s ‘Revolution Hits the Universities’ | Kris Olds -Inside Higher Ed | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

"In short, there are political and economic machinations associated with the stirring of interest in, and coverage of, MOOCs. Given this, and given the stakes at hand, it is important to address the MOOCs phenomenon is a serious, sustained, and reflective way, not in a knee jerk fashion, one way or the other."


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 14, 2013 6:50 AM

This is an article I failed to notice when it came out, January 27th 2013, but still it is well worth mentioning. It was prompted by an article by Thomas Friedman ("The World is Flat") in the New York Times (http://tiny.cc/jyvhsw) and by a Moody's report on MOOCs (cf. http://tiny.cc/dsvhsw). Kris Olds tries to put some realism into the overly enthusiastic reports on MOOCs that have appeared, particulary the one by Friedman.

 

First, he argues, the upscaling that MOOCs promise is less simple than Friedman suggests: the world is not flat but spiky, with lots of differences between people in their ability to actually take a MOOC (technical, in terms of learning capabilities). Second, the investments needed to set up a MOOC are high, even though the running costs may be low. So not everybody will be able to develop a MOOC. And finally, MOOCs have become part of a political discussion, with their potential to cut costs and thus lower public university funding, which in turn means less taxes. MOOCs thus are a politized platform, and indeed they are. But they are not just so in an economic sense. As I have argued earlier elsewhere (http://tiny.cc/e4uhsw), they are also subject to political debate in view of their capacity to upset the philosphy that underlies our higher education system. MOOCs have the potential to turn higher education into a commodity, a private good, subjected to the laws of the market economy. That is a revolution indeed, considering that at present higher education is a public good, depending on where you live fully or in part. (@pbsloep)

Paulo Moekotte's comment, February 18, 2013 2:41 PM
Dear Peter,

I guess the way xMOOCs are developing substantiates Olds' points with regard to the economical perspective and tendency to commodify HigherEd through this kind of distribution models of learning. But let's not forget that the aspect of increasing accessibility and affordability of learning is still a favorable option in a lot of developing countries. Therefore extending education to those in need but hard to reach, should not be dismissed lightly.
A political discussion about costs and new distribution models that could possibly compete with traditonal institutions and educational means in developed countries however troubles the discussion, and could endanger the societal goals of equality and social mobility that have longtime spurred public education.

The discussion about costs has been led for more than ten years in the US, mainly corroborated by the longstanding and succesful projects and work of Carol Twigg concerning large-enrollment introductory courses and the use of technology (i.e. Program in Course Redesign).

Nevertheless, cMOOCs originate and operate from a different, more community driven angle and altruistic, not for profit perspective. Taken connectivisme serious would mean that models and initiatives we've known for a longer time, like the OER-model of the Rice university (the openstaxcollege for example) would be less depend on institutions and more community driven. Developing and sustaining OER-models is a costly affair and not something that publicly funded institutions can keep on doing forever.

So what's new about the cMOOCs when looking at the 'older' OER-models? And should we favor cMOOC's over xMOOCs? Or can both models co-exist? And where do the control of the quality of content and delivery and the accreditation of outcomes step in? Still a lot of questions that remain to be answered.