Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
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Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
How meta-learning (information about learning) can improve learning, and related topics.
Curated by Pamela D Lloyd
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Growth mindset guru Carol Dweck says teachers and parents often use her research incorrectly - The Hechinger Report

Growth mindset guru Carol Dweck says teachers and parents often use her research incorrectly - The Hechinger Report | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck has become something of a cult figure in education and parenting circles. Her research into boosting student motivation has spawned a mini industry of consultants, sold more than a million books and changed the way that many adults praise children. Dweck believes too many students are hobbled by the belief that intelligence …

 

Praising effort alone 

Many parents and teachers have interpreted Dweck’s work to mean that they should praise a child’s effort, such as “I’m proud that you tried really hard,” or “I see how much effort you put into this.” Or teachers sometimes give A’s on assignments if a child has attempted all of the questions, regardless of whether the answers are good or not.

“It’s like the consolation prize. ‘Oh, at least you worked hard,'” said Dweck. “What if they didn’t make progress or they didn’t learn?”

Praising effort alone, she says, is useless when the child is getting everything wrong and not making progress. Either students will feel misled when they are eventually confronted with the reality of their low achievement, or the hollow praise will convey adults’ low expectations for them.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

It's important that praise be aligned with relevant and useful feedback. All learners need to know what they are doing right, and what they are getting wrong, in order to progress.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 24, 2015 2:28 PM
Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck has become something of a cult figure in education and parenting circles. Her research into boosting student motivation has spawned a mini industry of consultants, sold more than a million books and changed the way that many adults praise children. Dweck believes too many students are hobbled by the belief that intelligence …


Praising effort alone 

Many parents and teachers have interpreted Dweck’s work to mean that they should praise a child’s effort, such as “I’m proud that you tried really hard,” or “I see how much effort you put into this.” Or teachers sometimes give A’s on assignments if a child has attempted all of the questions, regardless of whether the answers are good or not.

“It’s like the consolation prize. ‘Oh, at least you worked hard,'” said Dweck. “What if they didn’t make progress or they didn’t learn?”

Praising effort alone, she says, is useless when the child is getting everything wrong and not making progress. Either students will feel misled when they are eventually confronted with the reality of their low achievement, or the hollow praise will convey adults’ low expectations for them.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset


Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:55 AM

Effort without results is hardly better for learning than results without effort.

Dixie Binford's curator insight, November 30, 2015 10:16 AM

Implementation with fidelity is important when new strategies from research comes to the classroom.  We often "cherry-pick" what we feel comfortable with but it is necessary to "lean in" and implement as intended by the author or researcher.  Be committed to self-reflection and evaluation of the progress you see in students.  Adjust, refine and commit to improving your execution.

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Citelighter: Research, Write & Cite

Citelighter: Research, Write & Cite | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Many teachers are ending their semesters with large scale assignments that require digital research.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Even at the college level, I find that students often leave citation preparation for the end of the writing cycle, after they've written a research paper. But, this just makes more work and opens them to accusations of plagiarism, as it's harder to identify the source of the material, once it's been integrated into the paper. Even when each use of someone else's material has been identified inline, if the correct citations on the References or Works Cited pages are missing or incorrect, the student is going to have difficulty pulling the source material together. Using a tool such as the one described here, may help students and other researchers to avoid citation headaches.

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Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School

Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Alan November explains how he would use the first five days of school to lay the groundwork for a year of learning that goes far beyond the test.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

"Often students have no idea why Google or any other search provider works the way it does. And they don’t know how to phrase questions to get the answers they seek."

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Data Curation as Digital Preservation of Documents and Electronic Artifacts: Key Reference Resources

Data Curation as Digital Preservation of Documents and Electronic Artifacts: Key Reference Resources | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Data (or Digital) Curation, is an academic/scientific discipline dedicated to preserve, organize and collect digital documents and other electronic artifacts for archival, re-use and repurposing objectives.

 

Check: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_curation and

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_curation

 

The importance of Data Curation can be easily underestimated as it may appear, to the casual viewer, as an arid, tedious document archival job.

 

In reality, Digital Curation efforts are of great value to the preservation of important cultural documents and data for future researchers who will want to access, in some organized way, the data-information-artifacts of our time. In addition, the data curation practices and guidelines developed by academic and research institutions can also be of value and inspiration to other types of curation work, that may adopt, emulate or innovate upon them.

If you are interested in learning more about Data/Digital Curation and in identifying the key organizations in this space, here is a good shortlist for you, thanks to the kind work of Kevin "the Librarian" Read:

 

University of Arizona – Digital Information Management
University of Illinois – Data Curation Education Program
University of North Carolina – DigCCurr University of Virginia – Scientific Data Consulting

Digital Curation Centre Digital Curation Exchange International Journal of Digital Curation Purdue-UIUC Data Curation Profiles Project

 

 

Useful. 7/10

 

Source: http://kevinthelibrarian.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/an-introduction-to-the-data-curation-lifecycle-model-where-do-librarians-fit-in/

 

 

 


Via Robin Good
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