Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
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Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
How meta-learning (information about learning) can improve learning, and related topics.
Curated by Pamela D Lloyd
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Neuromyth: Do Learning Styles Matter?

Neuromyth: Do Learning Styles Matter? | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
By busting the learning styles myth, we hope to help teachers focus on matching instruction with the content and learning goals, not learning styles.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Teachers and other learning professionals are often taught about learning styles. In fact, learning styles may even be a required part of continuing education practices. The training I received as a teacher and as a tutor made learning styles a requirement and encouraged me to evaluate student learning preferences. This would be great if the science backed up the idea that matching instruction techniques to learning styles actually improves learning, but the sad truth of the matter is that the science tells us that learning styles are irrelevant when it comes to how much students actually learn. What will help maximize learning? Helping students understand concepts when they are working with conceptual materials, helping them improve memory skills when working with material that simply needs to be remembered, and creating learning environments that encourage student engagement with learning. This last point is the most important because students learn best when they want to learn.

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Stacey Edmonds's curator insight, November 28, 2015 9:30 PM

Love this article.   Know thy format, make good content.  The End.

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Your Nostalgia Isn’t Helping Me Learn — The Synapse — Medium

Your Nostalgia Isn't Helping Me Learn - The Synapse - Medium
Rethinking recent “common sense” claims about technology as distraction in the classroom.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

There are many claims that new technological tools are harmful to learning, but are those claims valid? Do students really learn more poorly when they take notes on a laptop than when they do so by hand? Michael Oman-Reagan says no, and identifies flaws in anti-technology research. He points, instead, to the need to leverage students' tool use in the classroom, while teaching them critical thinking skills that will support their learning regardless of which tools they use because effective use of technology is a necessary skill in today's world and the world of the future.

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Olgy Gary's curator insight, April 8, 2015 11:29 PM
I agree with Pamela D Lloyd when she writes: "There are many claims that new technological tools are harmful to learning, but are those claims valid? Do students really learn more poorly when they take notes on a laptop than when they do so by hand? Michael Oman-Reagan says no, and identifies flaws in anti-technology research. He points, instead, to the need to leverage students' tool use in the classroom, while teaching them critical thinking skills that will support their learning regardless of which tools they use because effective use of technology is a necessary skill in today's world and the world of the future." 
http://www.scoop.it/t/learning-education-and-neuroscience
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How to Build a Better Learner

How to Build a Better Learner | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Brain studies suggest new ways to improve reading, writing and arithmetic—and even social skills
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Fascinating article about new insights into learning.

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Can Students ‘Go Deep’ With Digital Reading?

Can Students ‘Go Deep’ With Digital Reading? | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Textbooks and other student reading material are increasingly going digital, but can students still interact with the text in ways that promote deep reading?
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

"While ever more schools adopt textbooks and student reading materials to digital readers like iPads and Chromebooks, some recent research suggests students may comprehend more from reading print." 


This examination of how middle school students respond to and work with digital textbooks addresses questions that are applicable to learners at all levels of instruction. Digital devices have many benefits, but they just don't provide the same level of interaction that physical books do. The physical process of interacting with a physical book, including the ability to write in the margins, is important when it comes to getting the most out of reading. Digital books just can't offer that, yet.


However, digital reading specialists are working on tools and strategies that will help to improve deep learning from digital materials. For example, students who are familiar with and use annotation apps within their textbooks may actually benefit from working with digital materials, since students are generally discouraged from writing in or marking up their physical textbooks.


In the meantime, there's a place for both physical and digital books in today's classrooms.

 

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GrupoCidep Autismo's curator insight, December 4, 2014 6:14 AM

la oportunidad de profundizar es mayor y mas accesible, la disponibillidad puede aumentar la motivación pero no crearla.

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Why Letter Grades Just Don’t Cut It

Why Letter Grades Just Don’t Cut It | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Letter-grades fail at giving students specific information about how they are doing in class.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Students don't need grades. In fact, grades can actually prevent real learning because students come to equate success in school with getting good grades, rather than with increasing their understanding of the subjects being taught and the world around them.

 

We know this. Not only has this been identified as a problem by educators for decades, but anyone who has ever started school as a curious child. excited by the prospect of learning, only to discover that school is boring, that school makes them hate learning, regardless of whether they get good or bad grades, knows this.

 

It's time to end the carrot and stick approach that is grading and begin giving children and their parents real feedback that promotes learning.

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Flip This: Bloom’s Taxonomy Should Start with Creating

Flip This: Bloom’s Taxonomy Should Start with Creating | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
One educator rethinks Bloom's Taxonomy because it gives the impression that there is a scarcity of creativity in students.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Start with creating. Be creative in your teaching. All aspects of learning are necessary and possible.

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The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

This article is part of a larger, on-going effort to help connect teachers and other learning professionals with the neuroscience of learning.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 8, 2013 1:08 PM

This is interesting. I recognized some, but not others.

Moses B. Tambason's curator insight, November 9, 2013 2:40 PM

More people are running to charity tube to post free videos and watch free videos than posting on you tube. Try posting at charity tube and you will never leave. http://www.africatube.net/ More visitors and more video views. Don't take our word for it, try it. Post one same video on youtube and put it on  http://www.africatube.net/ and return ater five hours and compare the viewers rate and decide for yourself. Create your very own group or forum and control who watch it and invite everyone to watch the video. Above all, post video in English or in any language and viewers can watch video description in their own language. Try it and let us know your experience. Above all it is absolutely free like youtube

Vincent Munch's curator insight, November 25, 2013 12:51 PM

Something we should all read

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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses.

Via Anu Ojaranta
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Educators have long told us that reading expands our minds. Here are some of the specific ways in which they do so.

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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, October 13, 2013 5:24 AM

Your brain on books. We all know reading is good for you, here's yet more proof.

sarah's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:08 AM

intéressant

Carol Rine's curator insight, October 29, 2013 7:54 AM

This is a GREAT article that has lots of embedded cross-linked articles within it.  :O)

 

Carol

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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.


Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good
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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

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Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School

Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Alan November explains how he would use the first five days of school to lay the groundwork for a year of learning that goes far beyond the test.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

"Often students have no idea why Google or any other search provider works the way it does. And they don’t know how to phrase questions to get the answers they seek."

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Eliminate Grades, Change the Educational System

Eliminate Grades, Change the Educational System | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

"Education is in need of some changes. If we eliminate grades, we make room for many important shifts that must occur in our current climate. It's time to shift the mindset; teachers, throw out grades.

Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

"Teachers, students and higher educational systems need to start valuing learning and progress over points if we want our students to be truly career and college ready."

 

I can't agree more. The focus of education needs to be on learning, not on grades.

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The High Cost of Neuromyths in Education

The High Cost of Neuromyths in Education | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Instead of believing in the right/left brain, learning styles, and that we use only ten percent of our brains, we should focus on neuroscience research.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Those of us who work in the education field need to be aware of the science and the pseudoscience, so we can avoid perpetuating the myths.

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The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning

The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

The highest-level executive thinking, making connections, and "aha" moments of insight and creative innovation are more likely to occur in an atmosphere of what Alfie Kohn calls exuberant discovery, where students of all ages retain that kindergarten enthusiasm of embracing each day with the joy of learning.


Via Nik Peachey
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

While stress may be useful for learning not to touch a hot stove, it tends to inhibit the kind of learning that is most needed by students in today's world.

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, October 31, 2014 3:59 AM

Innovation and creativity can only emerge in moments of stillness! #mindful #leadership

Josefina Santos's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:09 AM

Amazing

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How to Get Students to Believe in Themselves | The New York Public Library

How to Get Students to Believe in Themselves | The New York Public Library | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
How many times do you hear students in your classroom or library say, “I can’t”? Doesn’t that phrase make you cringe? I always tell students, "Don’t say that because you can,” and help them figure out ways to reach their goals.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Such useful advice in so many contexts.

 

Now, eat your goldfish crackers!

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The Joy Of Making Things « Annie Murphy Paul

The Joy Of Making Things « Annie Murphy Paul | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

In New Haven, Connecticut, where I live with my husband and two sons, we are lucky to have nearby the Eli Whitney Museum. This place is the opposite of a “please don’t touch” repository of fine art. It’s an  ”experimental learning workshop” where kids engage in an essential but increasingly rare activity: they make stuff.

Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Hands On! Please touch. Make things. Get your hands dirty. Take it apart. Put it together. Tinker with it. Can you make it better?

These are the attitudes our schools need to share with kids. We learn best by doing. Regardless of our "primary learning style," the best way to make learning your own is by doing.

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what are the attitudes about learning you're passing on to your kids?

what are the attitudes about learning you're passing on to your kids? | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Annie Murphy Paul is a book author, magazine journalist, consultant and speaker who helps people understand how we learn and how we can do it better. Her latest book, How to Be Brilliant, is forthcoming from Crown.

 

"I've written a lot on the Brilliant Blog about how relationships can enhance learning. We learn better when we "apprentice" ourselves to someone more knowledgeable, for example; when we ourselves teach others; and when we discuss and debate with our peers."

Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Attitudes about learning are crucial, and always have been. 

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How Much Do You Know About How To Learn? « Annie Murphy Paul

How Much Do You Know About How To Learn? « Annie Murphy Paul | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

What’s the key to effective learning? One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you know.

Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

The more you know about how to learn and the greater the number of effective learning strategies you use, the better you are able to learn. Learning how to learn can be the key to success in any learning endeavor, whether you are learning in school or out.

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Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White

Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Robin Good: What does curation mean from an educational viewpoint? And what is the key difference between "collecting" and "curating".

Nancy White (@NancyW), a 21st Century Learning & Innovation Specialist and the author of Innovations in Education blog, has written an excellent article, dissecting the key characterizing traits of curation, as a valuable resource to create and share knowledge. 

 

She truly distills some key traits of curation in a way that is clear and comprehensible to anyone.

 

She writes: "The first thing I realized is that in order to have value-added benefits to curating information, the collector needs to move beyond just classifying the objects under a certain theme to deeper thinking through a) synthesis and b) evaluation of the collected items.

 

How are they connected?"

 

Excellent definition. 

 

And then she also frames perfectly the relevance of "context" for any meaningful curation project by writing: "I believe when we curate, organization moves beyond thematic to contextual – as we start to build knowledge and understanding with each new resource that we curate.

 

Themes have a common unifying element – but don’t necessarily explain the “why.”

 

Theme supports a central idea – Context allows the learner to determine why that idea (or in this case, resource) is important.

 

So, as collecting progresses into curating, context becomes essential to determine what to keep, and what to discard."

 

But there's a lot more insight distilled in this article as Nancy captures with elegance the difference between collecting for a personal interest and curating for a specific audience. 

 

She finally steals my full endorsement for this article by discretely inquirying how great a value it would be to allow students to "curate" the domains of interest they need to master.

 

Excellent. Highly recommended. 9/10

 

Full article: http://d20innovation.d20blogs.org/2012/07/07/understanding-content-curation/ ;

 


Via Robin Good, Pamela D Lloyd
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Beth Kanter's comment, July 8, 2012 1:22 PM
I especially like how she used the Bloom's Taxonomy and related that to curation.
Stalder Angèle's comment, August 1, 2012 3:56 AM
Thank you for this scoop!
Shaz J's comment, August 5, 2012 10:39 AM
Thanks for this!