Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
5.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
How meta-learning (information about learning) can improve learning, and related topics.
Curated by Pamela D Lloyd
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Growth mindset guru Carol Dweck says teachers and parents often use her research incorrectly - The Hechinger Report

Growth mindset guru Carol Dweck says teachers and parents often use her research incorrectly - The Hechinger Report | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck has become something of a cult figure in education and parenting circles. Her research into boosting student motivation has spawned a mini industry of consultants, sold more than a million books and changed the way that many adults praise children. Dweck believes too many students are hobbled by the belief that intelligence …

 

Praising effort alone 

Many parents and teachers have interpreted Dweck’s work to mean that they should praise a child’s effort, such as “I’m proud that you tried really hard,” or “I see how much effort you put into this.” Or teachers sometimes give A’s on assignments if a child has attempted all of the questions, regardless of whether the answers are good or not.

“It’s like the consolation prize. ‘Oh, at least you worked hard,'” said Dweck. “What if they didn’t make progress or they didn’t learn?”

Praising effort alone, she says, is useless when the child is getting everything wrong and not making progress. Either students will feel misled when they are eventually confronted with the reality of their low achievement, or the hollow praise will convey adults’ low expectations for them.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

It's important that praise be aligned with relevant and useful feedback. All learners need to know what they are doing right, and what they are getting wrong, in order to progress.

more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, November 24, 2015 2:28 PM
Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck has become something of a cult figure in education and parenting circles. Her research into boosting student motivation has spawned a mini industry of consultants, sold more than a million books and changed the way that many adults praise children. Dweck believes too many students are hobbled by the belief that intelligence …


Praising effort alone 

Many parents and teachers have interpreted Dweck’s work to mean that they should praise a child’s effort, such as “I’m proud that you tried really hard,” or “I see how much effort you put into this.” Or teachers sometimes give A’s on assignments if a child has attempted all of the questions, regardless of whether the answers are good or not.

“It’s like the consolation prize. ‘Oh, at least you worked hard,'” said Dweck. “What if they didn’t make progress or they didn’t learn?”

Praising effort alone, she says, is useless when the child is getting everything wrong and not making progress. Either students will feel misled when they are eventually confronted with the reality of their low achievement, or the hollow praise will convey adults’ low expectations for them.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset


Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:55 AM

Effort without results is hardly better for learning than results without effort.

Dixie Binford's curator insight, November 30, 2015 10:16 AM

Implementation with fidelity is important when new strategies from research comes to the classroom.  We often "cherry-pick" what we feel comfortable with but it is necessary to "lean in" and implement as intended by the author or researcher.  Be committed to self-reflection and evaluation of the progress you see in students.  Adjust, refine and commit to improving your execution.

Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

English Classic Verb Conjugator & Verbal Phrase Paths

English Classic Verb Conjugator & Verbal Phrase Paths | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

An interactive conjugator of English verbs arranged in a classic table format, with the additional feature allowing instructors to make links for their syllabus that control what students see so that they can be exposed only to what they have already studied along with the new features being studied.


Via Nik Peachey
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

A useful tool for helping ESL and beginning writing students understand verb conjugation.

more...
delta14's curator insight, February 26, 2014 8:07 AM

Recurso para apoyar el aprendizaje del idioma inglés.

John O'Connor's curator insight, March 19, 2014 7:49 PM

A nice tool for reminding students about some grammar relationships.

Rosanna López 's curator insight, March 30, 2014 6:59 AM

English tenses. Interactive conjugator of English verbs.

Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


Via Gust MEES
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

We learn by doing, so teaching should ask us to do.

more...
Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, February 23, 2014 11:10 PM

from hybridpedagogy.com a new online journal. 

Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2014 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, February 28, 2015 4:54 PM

Includes a great podcast

Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Do you have the wrong impression about online learning? [Infographic]

Do you have the wrong impression about online learning? [Infographic] | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Today, no longer is having a high school diploma is enough to land a good job and support family. College is key today, but finding the funds to pay for it can be tricky. Brick and mortar institutions cost a fortune, and most have to work while going to school. But for those who can't juggle both, online learning can be a great option.

 

We know what that you may think this avenue is for slackers, but have a look at our infographic below, and your opinion may just change.

 


Via Gust MEES, Dennis T OConnor
more...
No comment yet.