Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
5.1K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
onto Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

A 60 Seconds Guide to The Use of Blogging in Education

A 60 Seconds Guide to The Use of Blogging in Education | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

A few months ago Educational Technology and Mobile Learning posted a detailed guide on how Teachers can Use Blogging in Education. We are glad this post has received a wide interaction from...

Close  


Via Jon Samuelson, Enid Baines, Kathleen Cercone, Costas Vasiliou, Annalisa Manca, Stefano D'ambrosio, Gilbert C FAURE, Virginia Pavlovich, Alexandro Lebron, juandoming, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
SLS Guernsey's curator insight, January 23, 2015 3:43 AM

Blogging is a really important tool to help with literacy skills. Give it a try.

Denis Lundie's curator insight, January 23, 2015 7:18 AM

Writing for the web, in all forms, is an essential communication skill. All languages should teach the techniques and rules that apply to writing for the web.

Dênia Falcão's curator insight, January 23, 2015 12:37 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
How meta-learning (information about learning) can improve learning, and related topics.
Curated by Pamela D Lloyd
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

To Help Students Learn, Engage the Emotions

To Help Students Learn, Engage the Emotions | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
“It is literally neurobiologically impossible to think deeply about things that you don’t care about,” says the neuroscientist Mary Helen Immordino-Yang.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:
Humans are hard-wired to learn, and an emotional connection to the material is necessary to that process.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read

Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
New research shows it’s possible to pick up some of the signs of dyslexia in the brain even before kids learn to read. And this earlier identification may start to substantially influence how parents, educators and clinicians tackle the disorder.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

From the article: "Using cutting-edge MRI technology, the researchers are able to pinpoint a specific neural pathway, a white matter tract in the brain’s left hemisphere that appears to be related to dyslexia: It’s called the arcuate fasciculus."

Dyslexia is the consequence of neurological functions that work differently in some people. It can be predicted long before we usually start to teach kids to read, and appropriate early intervention can help to minimize disruption to the reading process.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by MIND Research Institute
Scoop.it!

Neuromyth: Do Learning Styles Matter?

Neuromyth: Do Learning Styles Matter? | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
By busting the learning styles myth, we hope to help teachers focus on matching instruction with the content and learning goals, not learning styles.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Teachers and other learning professionals are often taught about learning styles. In fact, learning styles may even be a required part of continuing education practices. The training I received as a teacher and as a tutor made learning styles a requirement and encouraged me to evaluate student learning preferences. This would be great if the science backed up the idea that matching instruction techniques to learning styles actually improves learning, but the sad truth of the matter is that the science tells us that learning styles are irrelevant when it comes to how much students actually learn. What will help maximize learning? Helping students understand concepts when they are working with conceptual materials, helping them improve memory skills when working with material that simply needs to be remembered, and creating learning environments that encourage student engagement with learning. This last point is the most important because students learn best when they want to learn.

more...
Stacey Edmonds's curator insight, November 28, 2015 9:30 PM

Love this article.   Know thy format, make good content.  The End.

Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

Discovery Could Lead to Better Recovery After Stroke

Discovery Could Lead to Better Recovery After Stroke | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Researchers have identified a molecule that signals brain tissue to form new connections to compensate for damage following a stroke.

Via iPamba
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Welcome news for future stroke sufferers and their families. My mother suffered a massive stroke from which she never fully recovered, making the last ten years of her life difficult ones. I sincerely hope that the prospects for recovery will improve.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Writing Your Way to Happiness

Writing Your Way to Happiness | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Some researchers believe that by writing and then editing our own stories, we can change our perceptions of ourselves and identify obstacles that stand in the way of better health.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

This article reports on research mentioned in, or similar to that in, http://www.scoop.it/t/learning-education-and-neuroscience/p/4048007584/2015/07/20/the-writing-assignment-that-changes-lives, but expands upon it to broaden the effect beyond students to those with mood disorders or other health problems, or even someone who just wants to improve memory.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

What MOOCs Are Teaching Universities About Active Learning

What MOOCs Are Teaching Universities About Active Learning | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
There's a lot of skepticism about whether or not MOOCs are "disrupting" higher education, but can they offer important learning opportunities for the institutions themselves?
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

The MOOC courses I've tried relied way too heavily on lectures, quizzes, and posting short essays in forums to be critiqued by students who often showed a distinct lack of understanding of the material. The courses didn't teach anything about active learning, except how not to engage students. They are not a direction I want to see used as a model for the future of education.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Is Math a Feature of the Universe or a Feature of Human Creation? | Idea Channel | PBS - YouTube

Math is invisible. Unlike physics, chemistry, and biology we can't see it, smell it, or even directly observe it in the universe. And so that has made a lot ...
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Math is extremely useful, but is it real, or is it simply a figment of the human imagination? This fast, fun, smart video is an episode of PBS's Idea Channel. It's also part of the 10 Unanswered Science Questions series. There's lots of food for thought here, entertainingly introduced by host Mike Rugnetta, and this could easily be used in a classroom to spark discussion about math, science, or the philosophy of those fields.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


Via Gust MEES
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

We learn by doing, so teaching should ask us to do.

more...
Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, February 23, 2014 11:10 PM

from hybridpedagogy.com a new online journal. 

Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2014 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, February 28, 2015 4:54 PM

Includes a great podcast

Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Eliminate Grades, Change the Educational System

Eliminate Grades, Change the Educational System | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

"Education is in need of some changes. If we eliminate grades, we make room for many important shifts that must occur in our current climate. It's time to shift the mindset; teachers, throw out grades.

Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

"Teachers, students and higher educational systems need to start valuing learning and progress over points if we want our students to be truly career and college ready."

 

I can't agree more. The focus of education needs to be on learning, not on grades.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

The High Cost of Neuromyths in Education

The High Cost of Neuromyths in Education | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Instead of believing in the right/left brain, learning styles, and that we use only ten percent of our brains, we should focus on neuroscience research.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Those of us who work in the education field need to be aware of the science and the pseudoscience, so we can avoid perpetuating the myths.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Can Students ‘Go Deep’ With Digital Reading?

Can Students ‘Go Deep’ With Digital Reading? | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Textbooks and other student reading material are increasingly going digital, but can students still interact with the text in ways that promote deep reading?
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

"While ever more schools adopt textbooks and student reading materials to digital readers like iPads and Chromebooks, some recent research suggests students may comprehend more from reading print." 


This examination of how middle school students respond to and work with digital textbooks addresses questions that are applicable to learners at all levels of instruction. Digital devices have many benefits, but they just don't provide the same level of interaction that physical books do. The physical process of interacting with a physical book, including the ability to write in the margins, is important when it comes to getting the most out of reading. Digital books just can't offer that, yet.


However, digital reading specialists are working on tools and strategies that will help to improve deep learning from digital materials. For example, students who are familiar with and use annotation apps within their textbooks may actually benefit from working with digital materials, since students are generally discouraged from writing in or marking up their physical textbooks.


In the meantime, there's a place for both physical and digital books in today's classrooms.

 

more...
GrupoCidep Autismo's curator insight, December 4, 2014 6:14 AM

la oportunidad de profundizar es mayor y mas accesible, la disponibillidad puede aumentar la motivación pero no crearla.

Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

The Other 21st Century Skills

The Other 21st Century Skills | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Many have attempted to identify the skills important for a learner today in this era of the 21st century (I know it is an overused phrase).  I have an affinity towards the skills identified by Tony...
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Excellent overview of the characteristics and skills that will help all students to thrive.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Why Letter Grades Just Don’t Cut It

Why Letter Grades Just Don’t Cut It | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Letter-grades fail at giving students specific information about how they are doing in class.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Students don't need grades. In fact, grades can actually prevent real learning because students come to equate success in school with getting good grades, rather than with increasing their understanding of the subjects being taught and the world around them.

 

We know this. Not only has this been identified as a problem by educators for decades, but anyone who has ever started school as a curious child. excited by the prospect of learning, only to discover that school is boring, that school makes them hate learning, regardless of whether they get good or bad grades, knows this.

 

It's time to end the carrot and stick approach that is grading and begin giving children and their parents real feedback that promotes learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Research-based Strategies to Help Children Develop Self-Control

Research-based Strategies to Help Children Develop Self-Control | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Self-control has been connected to positive outcomes for kids later in life. Walter Mischel outlines strategies educators can use to help kids grow this skill.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Helping our children learn strategies that increase their ability to exercise self-control can help them to be more successful later in life. Bonus: Adults can improve their self-control skills, too.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Growth mindset guru Carol Dweck says teachers and parents often use her research incorrectly - The Hechinger Report

Growth mindset guru Carol Dweck says teachers and parents often use her research incorrectly - The Hechinger Report | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck has become something of a cult figure in education and parenting circles. Her research into boosting student motivation has spawned a mini industry of consultants, sold more than a million books and changed the way that many adults praise children. Dweck believes too many students are hobbled by the belief that intelligence …

 

Praising effort alone 

Many parents and teachers have interpreted Dweck’s work to mean that they should praise a child’s effort, such as “I’m proud that you tried really hard,” or “I see how much effort you put into this.” Or teachers sometimes give A’s on assignments if a child has attempted all of the questions, regardless of whether the answers are good or not.

“It’s like the consolation prize. ‘Oh, at least you worked hard,'” said Dweck. “What if they didn’t make progress or they didn’t learn?”

Praising effort alone, she says, is useless when the child is getting everything wrong and not making progress. Either students will feel misled when they are eventually confronted with the reality of their low achievement, or the hollow praise will convey adults’ low expectations for them.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

It's important that praise be aligned with relevant and useful feedback. All learners need to know what they are doing right, and what they are getting wrong, in order to progress.

more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, November 24, 2015 2:28 PM
Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck has become something of a cult figure in education and parenting circles. Her research into boosting student motivation has spawned a mini industry of consultants, sold more than a million books and changed the way that many adults praise children. Dweck believes too many students are hobbled by the belief that intelligence …


Praising effort alone 

Many parents and teachers have interpreted Dweck’s work to mean that they should praise a child’s effort, such as “I’m proud that you tried really hard,” or “I see how much effort you put into this.” Or teachers sometimes give A’s on assignments if a child has attempted all of the questions, regardless of whether the answers are good or not.

“It’s like the consolation prize. ‘Oh, at least you worked hard,'” said Dweck. “What if they didn’t make progress or they didn’t learn?”

Praising effort alone, she says, is useless when the child is getting everything wrong and not making progress. Either students will feel misled when they are eventually confronted with the reality of their low achievement, or the hollow praise will convey adults’ low expectations for them.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset


Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:55 AM

Effort without results is hardly better for learning than results without effort.

Dixie Binford's curator insight, November 30, 2015 10:16 AM

Implementation with fidelity is important when new strategies from research comes to the classroom.  We often "cherry-pick" what we feel comfortable with but it is necessary to "lean in" and implement as intended by the author or researcher.  Be committed to self-reflection and evaluation of the progress you see in students.  Adjust, refine and commit to improving your execution.

Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Students in Debt, Professors in Poverty -- What's Going Wrong?

Students in Debt, Professors in Poverty -- What's Going Wrong? | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

"The fight for a living wage has been a hot-button issue over the past 5 years and will certainly be a talking point in upcoming presidential elections. In a time when college enrollment is booming and college tuition is at an all-time high, the prospect of getting an upper-level degree and working at a college or university would seem like a sure bet for anyone. And yet, in 2015, a PhD does not guarantee a great living. In fact, it doesn't guarantee you will be able to get by at all."

Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Education in the US is becoming increasingly costly for students, but providing fewer and smaller benefits for many graduates. This is especially true for those whose dream is to teach at the college level, but who are unable to get a full-time teaching position. According to the article, "adjunct professors make up more than 51 percent of teaching faculty at colleges in the United States, across all levels (community colleges, research universities, etc.)." Many adjuncts live at or below the poverty level, many take on other jobs in order to earn enough to live on, and many wind up on government assistance, despite their high level of education and their hard work. But, this doesn't only effect the adjuncts and their families. "With so much additional responsibility to survive, many adjuncts can't hold regular office hours at any of the campuses they teach. This comes at a huge disadvantage to their students who may need extra help, one-on-one tutoring, or to talk about the course. Still, colleges insist that the current model is the best way to serve its students. But the truth couldn't be any more clear: it's strictly about the money."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School

Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Alan November explains how he would use the first five days of school to lay the groundwork for a year of learning that goes far beyond the test.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

"Often students have no idea why Google or any other search provider works the way it does. And they don’t know how to phrase questions to get the answers they seek."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

The Writing Assignment That Changes Lives

The Writing Assignment That Changes Lives | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Goal-setting closed achievement gaps in a recent experiment. The key element? Students put their thoughts in writing.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Intriguing research.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Your Nostalgia Isn’t Helping Me Learn — The Synapse — Medium

Your Nostalgia Isn't Helping Me Learn - The Synapse - Medium
Rethinking recent “common sense” claims about technology as distraction in the classroom.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

There are many claims that new technological tools are harmful to learning, but are those claims valid? Do students really learn more poorly when they take notes on a laptop than when they do so by hand? Michael Oman-Reagan says no, and identifies flaws in anti-technology research. He points, instead, to the need to leverage students' tool use in the classroom, while teaching them critical thinking skills that will support their learning regardless of which tools they use because effective use of technology is a necessary skill in today's world and the world of the future.

more...
Olgy Gary's curator insight, April 8, 2015 11:29 PM
I agree with Pamela D Lloyd when she writes: "There are many claims that new technological tools are harmful to learning, but are those claims valid? Do students really learn more poorly when they take notes on a laptop than when they do so by hand? Michael Oman-Reagan says no, and identifies flaws in anti-technology research. He points, instead, to the need to leverage students' tool use in the classroom, while teaching them critical thinking skills that will support their learning regardless of which tools they use because effective use of technology is a necessary skill in today's world and the world of the future." 
http://www.scoop.it/t/learning-education-and-neuroscience
Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from Digital Presentations in Education
Scoop.it!

9 Creative Storytelling Tools That Will Make You Wish You Were A Student Again

9 Creative Storytelling Tools That Will Make You Wish You Were A Student Again | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

T.H.E. Journal asked educators for the most creative storytelling apps available, and we did a little digging on our own, too. The tools and apps we found turn students into novelists, artists, and moviemakers with each tool bringing its own powerful mechanism for transforming the traditional narrative--both inside and outside the classroom...


Via Baiba Svenca
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Lots of new tools to play with!

more...
Laura Kamis Wrang's curator insight, September 4, 2014 5:48 AM

TIME is of the essence opportunies to create and recreate are all over the place!!!

A.K.Andrew's curator insight, March 2, 2015 11:24 AM

while I haven't tried these apps, it's a great selection of giving your novel am visual summary.  Anything to breathe some life into that synopsis eh? I'll def. Be checking the, out

Charlie Dare's curator insight, March 6, 2015 6:28 AM

Lucky IT students of today ~

Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from InformationCommunication (ICT)
Scoop.it!

6 Alternative Social Media Tools for Teaching and Learning -- Campus Technology

6 Alternative Social Media Tools for Teaching and Learning -- Campus Technology | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Facebook and Twitter may be ubiquitous, but there are many other social media tools out there that can enhance teaching and learning. Here, three educators share their favorites.


Via Dan Kirsch
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Students may not want to befriend their teacher on Facebook, but that doesn't mean social media is out of the question for school assignments.

more...
Barbara Macfarlan's curator insight, January 30, 2015 4:39 PM

These ideas would be very easy to implement into your teaching and give students the opportunity to explore their learning through different media.

Linda Ashida's curator insight, February 1, 2015 11:28 AM

This article give examples of how Voice Thread, Diigo, Scoop.It, Instagram, Pinterest, and Feedly can be used to enhance teaching and learning.  The article wraps up with three key benefits of using social media in the classroom.

Amy in ATL's curator insight, February 1, 2015 11:49 AM

I like it when social media can help guide a project for a student and a teacher. Check out these other platforms that are being utilized For education. #ufglobal

Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

How to Build a Better Learner

How to Build a Better Learner | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Brain studies suggest new ways to improve reading, writing and arithmetic—and even social skills
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Fascinating article about new insights into learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing

The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

These teachers see the internet and digital technologies such as social networking sites, cell phones and texting, generally facilitating teens’ personal expression and creativity, broadening the audience for their written material, and encouraging teens to write more often in more formats than may have been the case in prior generations.  At the same time, they describe the unique challenges of teaching writing in the digital age, including the “creep” of informal style into formal writing assignments and the need to better educate students about issues such as plagiarism and fair use.


Via Nik Peachey
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

This study provides insight into the issues teachers see, positive and negative, regarding the ways in which digital tools impact student writing. Overall, they see many benefits, but there are specific areas of concern.

more...
CECI Jean-François's curator insight, November 10, 2014 2:49 AM

Enquête sur la litteracie numerique, des chiffres intéressants...

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 9, 2015 9:38 AM

I definitely see the need to "better educate students about issues such as plagiarism and fair use."

Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning

The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning | Learning, Education, and Neuroscience | Scoop.it

The highest-level executive thinking, making connections, and "aha" moments of insight and creative innovation are more likely to occur in an atmosphere of what Alfie Kohn calls exuberant discovery, where students of all ages retain that kindergarten enthusiasm of embracing each day with the joy of learning.


Via Nik Peachey
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

While stress may be useful for learning not to touch a hot stove, it tends to inhibit the kind of learning that is most needed by students in today's world.

more...
Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, October 31, 2014 3:59 AM

Innovation and creativity can only emerge in moments of stillness! #mindful #leadership

Josefina Santos's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:09 AM

Amazing

Scooped by Pamela D Lloyd
Scoop.it!

Finance Systems Perpetuate Inequitable Funding Of U.S. Schools

According to a report out of the Center for American Progress, inequitable per-pupil spending perpetuated by regressive state and local school-finance systems remains cause for concern in U.S. public schools, despite state aid formulas designed to work to the contrary.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

It's time we make publicly-funded education an equal playing field.

more...
No comment yet.