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Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn

Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
What’s the key to effective learning? One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you know.

Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed., Lynnette Van Dyke, Helen Teague
Tony Meehan's insight:

"Most striking, low-achieving students show “substantial deficits” in their awareness of the cognitive and metacognitive strategies that lead to effective learning—suggesting that these students’ struggles may be due in part to a gap in their knowledge about how learning works."

We cannot expect to narrow the gap until we take the time to provide low achieving learners, far too often those of low socio-economic status, with the tools to learn for themselves, to have the confidence to enjoy learning and be curious about the wider world.

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, May 27, 2014 8:14 PM

The development for learning strategies within your teaching and learning environment. I use metacognitive learning strategies within all the courses that at teach at the university level.

Karen Bowden's curator insight, May 28, 2014 3:09 PM

"In our schools, “the emphasis is on what students need to learn, whereas little emphasis—if any—is placed on training students how they should go about learning the content and what skills will promote efficient studying to support robust learning,” writes John Dunlosky, professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio..."

Terry Doherty's curator insight, June 2, 2014 6:02 PM

Until I had a child, it never dawned on me that she needed to learn how to learn ... Oh, how I wish I had had this road map to get us started.

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How to Design a Growth-Minded School

How to Design a Growth-Minded School | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
How Might We design a school that encourages, nurtures and teaches a Growth Mindset? From Curriculum to Culture, here is a School By Design! *This post is based on Carol Dweck's Growth Mindset theo...
Tony Meehan's insight:

From Curriculum to Culture, here is a School By Design! Developing a Growth-minded school is about growing learners into creative, risk-taking individuals with strong  intrapersonal and interpersonal skills.

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No quick fix for pupils with a fixed mindset about their own intelligence

No quick fix for pupils with a fixed mindset about their own intelligence | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
New research found that a programme aimed at changing pupils' mindsets had no significant impact on their attainment.

Via Shary Lyssy Marshall
Tony Meehan's insight:

This highlights the need for a sustained approach towards changing learners with fixed mindsets about their intelligence, particularly those brought up in an environment which has fostered that mindset over years, or generations even.

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Leveraging Teacher Leadership:The Problem-Solving Power of Teachers

Leveraging Teacher Leadership:The Problem-Solving Power of Teachers | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Tony Meehan's insight:

Useful article with good insight into how top-down practices and policies in schools flounder, often creating more work for staff and resentment on the part of all stakeholders.  This also provides a really useful model on how to avoid such pitfalls by, in this case, stepping away from long held preconceptions about homework. The article actually suggests reframing the work that is expected to be done outside school hours and see it as a means to offer support to those learners most in need of targeted intervention. Everybody wins.

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, September 25, 2013 12:27 PM

"The best solutions to problems in education may just come from those closest to students."

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Noam Chomsky on the Dangers of Standardized Testing

Noam Chomsky on the Dangers of Standardized Testing | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
“You take what is happening in education. Right now, in recent years, there’s a strong tendency to require assessment of children and teachers so that you have to teach to tests. And the test determines what happens to the child and what happens to the teacher.
Tony Meehan's insight:

“You take what is happening in education. Right now, in recent years, there’s a strong tendency to require assessment of children and teachers so that you have to teach to tests. And the test determines what happens to the child and what happens to the teacher."


This is is not learning.

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The Difference Between Praise That Promotes Narcissism vs. Healthy Self-Esteem

The Difference Between Praise That Promotes Narcissism vs. Healthy Self-Esteem | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
Telling your kids that they're superfabulous encourages narcissistic thinking, researchers say. And that doesn't bode well for their future happiness. Better to recognize effort and express warmth.[[ This is a content summary only.
Via Dean J. Fusto
Tony Meehan's insight:
"parents can raise their children’s self-esteem just by expressing more warmth."
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Multiple Intelligences & Comics Education

Multiple Intelligences & Comics Education | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
Here's a repost of the MI article from the 2011 NECAC anthology:
Tony Meehan's insight:

very witty look at Multiple Intelligences emphasising the complexity of our brains and how we learn.  The article makes clear that MIs do not define so-called learning styles.

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Why All Ed Reform Fails

Why All Ed Reform Fails | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
Why All Ed Reform Fails
Tony Meehan's insight:

"Learning starts with self-awareness, affectionate knowledge of “other,” and practice reaching for that which is just out of reach. This can be supported in schools, but not birthed.


Learning necessitates a kind of “intellectual life” that is grown in an intimacy available only at home, in neighborhoods and other communities where “self” and “other” are carefully known."


All ed reforms fail because they focus on schools and the teachers and the curriculum, but schools can only do so much.  


"Spirited creativity, collaboration, and higher-order thinking (ideas learners are instinctively drawn to) are less accessible and expensive, so schools do what any most businesses would do: measure what is accessible in as cost-effective a manner"


For those pupils of low socio-economic status this is a particular challenge as these attributes require a robust sense of self and confidence which is not provided at home.  How schools are expected to fill the gap to enable these learners get a foothold in society is an issue not addressed by "education reform".  Politically it would not be acceptable to talk of reform reaching so far into family / community life.  Better leave it to the teachers then.

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4 learning strategies that make the most of flipped learning

4 learning strategies that make the most of flipped learning | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it

“ Flipped learning is not a destination in itself. It’s a gateway that eases the transition to more effective educational paradigms, including personalized, passion-based and project-based learning.”


Via B de los Arcos, Alma Vega, Dean J. Fusto
Tony Meehan's insight:

The subtext of the article is that flipped learning cannot become just another means to revert to worksheets or "boring" lecture-style delivery on video as opposed to a boring lecture style in front of a class. It requires a leap of faith to tap into what learners are passionate about so as to enthuse them to help develop those higher order thinking skills vital for a 21st century approach to teaching and learning. The control has to be with the learners.

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HOW DO STUDENTS DEVELOP MASTERY?

HOW DO  STUDENTS DEVELOP MASTERY? | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
From Novice to Master… As we learn and develop mastery of a skill, our level of expertise grows and changes with our ability to know when and how to use that knowledge.  In the book How Learning...

Via John Shank, Lynnette Van Dyke, Les Howard, diane gusa, Dean J. Fusto
Tony Meehan's insight:

This model describes 4 levels of mastery using measurements of competence and consciousness.  As novices, we are in a state of “Unconscious Incompetence”, where we don’t recognize what we need to know.  As we gain knowledge and experience, we transition to “Conscious Incompetence,” where we are aware of what we do not know.  Developing further, the third stage is “Conscious Competence,” where most of us remain.  We have considerable ability and knowledge at our craft, yet it is not automatic; we must still think and act deliberately.  The fourth and final stage is mastery, or “Unconscious Competence”.

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John Shank's curator insight, November 20, 2014 4:12 PM

This concept has very real implications for how students and faculty alike view information literacy skills and knowledge. #ALA #ALA_ACRL #infolit #blendedlibrarian

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Great Teachers Don't Teach

Great Teachers Don't Teach | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
Blogger Ben Johnson outlines constructivist and experiential teaching techniques that go beyond direct instruction.
Tony Meehan's insight:
Tony Meehan's insight:

'Students learn best when they are in control of their learning. Students must do the heavy lifting of learning and nothing the teacher can say or do will change that. Real learning requires doing, not listening, or observing only. Yet what do we find in every public school and university? Teachers talking, talking and talking while students listen, daydream and doze."

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Tony Meehan's curator insight, October 29, 2014 6:23 PM

'Students learn best when they are in control of their learning. Students must do the heavy lifting of learning and nothing the teacher can say or do will change that. Real learning requires doing, not listening, or observing only. Yet what do we find in every public school and university? Teachers talking, talking and talking while students listen, daydream and doze."

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Teachers, Keep Your Eye On The Prize

Teachers, Keep Your Eye On The Prize | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
TEST We Need To Talk About An Injustice: Keep Your Eye On The Prize
by Terry Heick
TED Talks are great, but in lieu of their site and app and YouTube channel and podcast and erstwhile access, they jumped the shark for me a couple of years ago.
Tony Meehan's insight:

One of the all time great TED talks surely.  A must for all in education (and outside it.)

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7 Most Useful Truths You Missed from Psychology Class

7 Most Useful Truths You Missed from Psychology Class | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
The most valuable things you can learn from the past few decades’ best books on psychology.
Tony Meehan's insight:

Some useful insights into how we perceive ourselves and how others may perceive us differently.  An what we can do about it.

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Tony Meehan's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:41 AM

Some useful insights into how we perceive ourselves and how others may perceive us differently.  An what we can do about it.

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Educational Psychology Interactive: Systems model of human behavior (Overview)

Educational Psychology Interactive: Systems model of human behavior (Overview) | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it

one must not only understand the entities in isolation, but must understand the relationships between or among entities. In this view, it is not enough to first study the development of thinking and then the development of emotion or to identify separate factors that make an effective school, rather these must be studied together in order to understand the relationships among the factors. This systems or organismic view reflects a transactional approach to educational and developmental psychology (e.g., Gordon, 1975; Schiamberg & Smith, 1982; Thompson, 1971) and provides the basis for the framework for studying human behavior presented below. Additionally, Koestler (1990) proposed that each individual component is a holon (simultaneously both a part and a whole) arranged in a holarchy (a never-ending relationship of parts to whole).


Via Sharrock
Tony Meehan's insight:

Thoughtful, Interesting and concise piece articulating the complexities of human behaviour, identifying what influences and shapes us as individuals: Cognitive, Affective, Conative, Spiritual and Behavioural (overt action); and then going on to explain how it is we as individuals fit into the cosmos along with its layers of influence from:

Person (as above) 

microsystem (the family along with  local neighborhood or community institutions such as the schoolreligious institutions and peer groups as well as the specific culture within which the family identifies) 

Mesosystem (includes social institutions involved in such activities as transportation, entertainment, news organizations

Macrosystem (international region we live in and more abstract notions of culture, such as how the digital age impacts upon local culture)

Cosmos (the planet we live on, the star we get heat and energy from and the rest of the universe.



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Stop Applauding: Feedback Components for Fostering Growth Mindsets - Corwin Connect

Stop Applauding: Feedback Components for Fostering Growth Mindsets - Corwin Connect | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
Adults can help students develop a growth mindset by using these three methods of feedback instead of meaningless accolades.

Via Mel Riddile, Lynnette Van Dyke
Tony Meehan's insight:

Grades, gold stars, merits etc. are no substitute for that short burst of focused, undivided attention one gives to each student in turn. It says, "I know where you are with your learning because I have followed how you have been learning very closely. Now what do you think you need to do next?" Priceless. 

@DrDebbieSilver suggess::

1. Give students undivided, focused attention

2. Talk less, listen more

3. Maintain the concept of, "a work in progress" ( you're not there just yet)


@alfiekohn writes about this in Punished by Rewards

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A Quiver of Teaching Strategies (Not Just One Silver Bullet)

A Quiver of Teaching Strategies (Not Just One Silver Bullet) | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
To develop a class of risk takers, administrators need to encourage faculty to try new teaching strategies so they model for their students risk taking, flexibility, and resilience when failure happens.

Via Patti Kinney, Dean J. Fusto
Tony Meehan's insight:

As educators we have to embrace as many, proven-to-be-effective teaching strategies as possible in order to be able to respond to the multiple ways learners learn. Restricting ourselves to one tried and tested - usually decades old - strategy risks alienating many learners who are growing up in a society with immediate access to information. Educators need an understanding of latest developments in cognitive psychology and neuroscience to inform just how we learn and from there what strategies to employ to meet the learning needs of all learners in our charge. 

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10 "truths" about educating kids that are often ignored - Alfie Kohn - Washington Post

10 "truths" about educating kids that are often ignored - Alfie Kohn - Washington Post | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
“The field of education bubbles over with controversies. It’s not unusual for intelligent people of good will to disagree passionately about what should happen in schools. But there are certain precepts that aren’t debatable, that just about anyone would have to acknowledge are true. While many such statements are banal, some are worth noticing because in our school practices and policies we tend to ignore the implications that follow from them. It’s both intellectually interesting and practically important to explore such contradictions: If we all agree that a given principle is true, then why in the world do our schools still function as if it weren’t? Here are 10 examples.”
Via John Evans, Dean J. Fusto
Tony Meehan's insight:
Pure common sense as usual from @AlfieKohn. He calls upon an impressive range of research to back up the view that education is (still) less about learning and more about passing tests.
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Leading Learning for Children From Poverty

Leading Learning for Children From Poverty | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
What bridges the gap between a culture of despair and a future of hope for children who live in poverty?
The answer is simple: effective educators who will not settle for mediocrity, who will not accept excuses for why these children can’t learn, who are willing to do whatever it takes to help each child succeed, who establish supportive environments where children learn to bounce back from life’s negative circumstances and thrive.
Many Americans believe that low-socioeconomic...
Tony Meehan's insight:

"Poverty does not mean a person is unable to succeed. Children who live in poverty can meet high expectations and standards."  Key is building trust and relationships.  It may be that we don't always succeed but we have to be indefatigable in our beliefs that deprivation does not automatically condemn our learners to a cycle of failure and despair.  

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Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
EDUTOPIA TOOL TIP


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Tony Meehan's insight:

While it is important to help pupils develop Growth mindsets, it is essential that the adults supporting the learners not only understand how to do this and have an understanding of the psychology behind Fixed and Growth mindsets, they have to have developed Growth Mindsets themselves in order to be effective. This article is a useful starting point, referencing the work of @jackiegerstein

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Fact Sheet: Metacognitive Processes | Teaching Excellence in Adult Literacy (TEAL)

Fact Sheet: Metacognitive Processes | Teaching Excellence in Adult Literacy (TEAL) | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
Tony Meehan's insight:

Useful article on what exactly metacognition is. It is a powerful means to enhance learning but not everyone, including educators, get it. Having a clear understanding of what "thinking about thinking" actually is means that it can be taught and passed on to learners.

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The Definition Of Intrinsic Motivation

The Definition Of Intrinsic Motivation | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
The Definition Of Intrinsic Motivation

A decent working definition of intrinsic motivation is “motivation that stems directly from an action rather than a reward.” Dr. Richard Ryan and Edward Deci explain in their Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivations: Classic Definitions & New Directions.

“Intrinsic motivation is defined as the doing of an activity for its inherent satisfaction rather than for some separable consequence. When intrinsically motivated, a person is moved to act for the fun or challenge entailed rather than because of external products, pressures, or rewards….In Self-Determination Theory, we distinguish between different types of motivation based on the different reason or goals that give rise to an action. The most basic distinction is between intrinsic motivation, which refers to doing something because it is inherently interesting or enjoyable, and extrinsic motivation, which refers to doing something because it leads to a separable outcome. Extrinsic motivation thus contrasts with intrinsic motivation, which refers to doing an activity simply for the enjoyment of the activity itself, rather than its instrumental value.”

Put another way, if a student studies for a test to make a qualifying grade to play for the basketball team, that would be an example of extrinsic motivation. Another example? Studying to “get good grades.” And as you probably know by now, its polar opposite, intrinsic motivation, is the more powerful of the two, though not necessarily more common.

In the following video, Daniel Pink explores the incredible impact of intrinsic motivation on performance, innovation, and the way we learn. While he frames the idea around “business,” he is clearly discussing learning and performance, which is why we’re all here, yes?

 


Via Sharrock
Tony Meehan's insight:

As @DanielPink says, this is something which has been proven time and time again and has been written about at least since the early 90s by @alfiekohn. Rewards (or extrinsic motivators) kill the creative instinct or the natural intrinsic motivation we have to learn and to love learning for itself.  We have to find what it is that pupils are interested in, awaken a passion in them for learning and work with them from that point.  The world we live in now is far less certain but far more exciting.  We have no idea what will happen in five, 10, 20 years (as @SirKenRobinson said about 10 years ago) that we need to foster creativity and the capacity to think way, way outside the box. That requires we stop churning out rewards to pupils in the hope that they will be masters of their own learning.  How much more proof is needed to demonstrate that rewards don't work? The reward is in the learning. We educators have to make learning rewarding.


In SCHOOLS we need to develop in our learners:

"Autonomy: the urge to direct our own lives

Mastery: the desire to get better and better at something that matters

Purpose: the yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves"


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Sharrock's curator insight, February 20, 8:43 AM


Kyle Pearce • 2 years ago writes: "we've all heard teachers say that their students lack "intrinsic motivation" without realizing that our delivery of course content is a huge factor in whether we will ever see students motivated intrinsically."

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Feedback that Fits

Feedback that Fits | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title

Tony Meehan's insight:

Excellent article on how to give effective feedback.

The power of formative assessment lies in its double-barreled approach, addressing both cognitive and motivational factors. Good formative assessment gives students information they need to understand where they are in their learning (the cognitive factor) and develops students' feelings of control over their learning (the motivational factor).

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America Needs an Education That Prepares Children for Life - Huffington Post (blog)

America Needs an Education That Prepares Children for Life - Huffington Post (blog) | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
The conclusion of the lead investigator after reviewing 75 years of data? "Happiness is love. Full stop." Our schools are not set up for this....

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Dean J. Fusto
Tony Meehan's insight:

"The conclusion of the lead investigator after reviewing 75 years of data? "Happiness is love. Full stop."


So there we have it.  That four-letter word which rarely gets a look-in in the debate about education and, more importantly, learning.  We need LOVE in there as the bedrock for our own learning, our teaching, our subject specialism, our pupils, and probably most importantly, for ourselves.

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What Are The Habits Of Mind?

What Are The Habits Of Mind? | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
TEST What Are The Habits Of Mind?
by TeachThought Staff
Editor’s Note: This post has been updated from a 2012 post.
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"It is not enough to understand concepts and principles and to solve that one problem, as challenging as it might be. The essential outcome is to develop and expand the dispositions of skillful problem solvers who can apply their learnings to an ever-expanding array of challenges not only in commonly taught subjects in school, but also in their communities, in their world and in their lives."


Preparation for life...

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The Requirements For A Great Idea In Education

The Requirements For A Great Idea In Education | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
TEST The Requirements For A Great Idea In Education
by Terry Heick
Every afternoon, after failing to take a nap because I make everything harder than it has to be, I pout down to Starbucks for coffee, and to read.
Tony Meehan's insight:

Rallying call for A Big Idea in Education.  As it stands education appears to be about stacking up the stats to demonstrate how effective institutions are.  And somehow in many cases this divorces education from learning.  We learn best when we are enthused and have our curiosity piqued.  


The author states: "Greatness, defined in education, is about inspired alignment to the form of the dance, but if it only makes mimics the form of the dance, making it faster or louder or more colorful, it’s not innovation at all. It’s amplification"


Time to slow the dance, step outside it and devise newer, wilder, more creative means of expression.. Time to fly......

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Educational Neuroscience (Wikipedia) | Neuroscience Hub

Educational Neuroscience (Wikipedia) | Neuroscience Hub | Learning in the 21st century | Scoop.it
Learning is the act of acquiring new, or modifying and reinforcing, existing knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, or preferences and may involve synthe...
Tony Meehan's insight:

More on the emerging field of Mind, Brain and Education (MBE) science

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