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Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
Understanding how the brain learns, functions and stays healthy.
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Using Just 10% of Your Brain? Think Again-Neuromyths

Using Just 10% of Your Brain? Think Again-Neuromyths | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

Popular neuromyths about how we learn are creating confusion in the classroom... "No, you do not, in fact, use just 10% of your brain, and "learning styles" make no difference in the classroom. Psychology professor Christopher Chabris discusses these and other "neuromyths" with WSJ's Gary Rosen."

 

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Test Your Brain: Bust the Myths About Educational Neuroscience

Test Your Brain: Bust the Myths About Educational Neuroscience | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

Educational neuroscience is a new and rapidly changing field, and numerous myths have percolated up through the years, based on unsubstantiated studies, findings taken out of context, and plain old snake-oil salesmen. Neuroeducation researcher Paul Howard-Jones of the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom found a majority of incoming teachers studied in that country had at least one misunderstanding about the brain and how it affects learning and instruction.
Try it out yourself: Decide which of the following statements is true or false.

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The Learning Style Neuromyth

The Learning Style Neuromyth | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

Neuromyth: There is a visual, auditive and a haptic type of learning...The type of learner theory states that learning occurs through different channels of perception. Under consideration of the right channel of perception, the individual learning efficacy can be improved. This theory dates back to Frederic Vester , who distinguished an auditive, a visual/optic, a haptic and an intellectual type of learner. According to Vester, the type of learner is biologically determined and can be characterized by the predominant use of one channel of perception: The auditive type of learner learns by using the ears, the optic type of learner by using the eyes, the haptic type of learner through usage of the skin (i.e. by touching), while the intellectual type of learner learns in a more abstract way: through understanding itself.  They are e.g. paying close attention which student uses which channel of perception in order to provide the student with the best-fitted input. This shows good will. However, even though this theory is quite plausible for laymen, experts do not accept this theory and its application in the classroom

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