Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
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Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
Understanding how the brain learns, functions and stays healthy.
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Neuroscience and the Bilingual Brain | Edutopia

Neuroscience and the Bilingual Brain | Edutopia | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it
Blogger Judy Willis shares neuroscientific research suggesting that children growing up bilingual develop better focus and judgment.
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The Bilingual Advantage: How a Child’s Brain is Impacted by Knowing a Second Language

The Bilingual Advantage: How a Child’s Brain is Impacted by Knowing a Second Language | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

Children who are raised bilingual develop language and cognitive skills differently, according to a new study carried out at York University in Toronto. The study showed that different factors are responsible for the language- and non-language-related outcomes of bilingualism seen in previous research.

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Cognitive neurospychology gives more and more prove that we need to go back to Phonics in teaching reading skills

Cognitive neurospychology gives more and more prove that we need to go back to Phonics in teaching reading skills | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it
Brain scans now prove that the main reason for dyslexia is linking sounds and letters (grapheme-phoneme encoding). This finding gives proof to research findings almost 20 yrs ago .
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The Benefits of Bilingualism

The Benefits of Bilingualism | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it
Being bilingual makes you smarter and can have a profound effect on your brain.
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Hearing Metaphors Activates Brain Regions Involved In Sensory ...

When a friend tells you she had a rough day, do you feel sandpaper under your fingers? The brain may be replaying sensory experiences to help understand common metaphors, new research suggests. Linguists and ...New brain imaging research reveals that a region of the brain important for sensing texture through touch, the parietal operculum, is also activated when someone listens to a sentence with a textural metaphor. The same region is not activated when a similar sentence expressing the meaning of the metaphor is heard.

The results were published online this week in the journal Brain & Language

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